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Maria Schneider

NATIONAL
November 9, 2002 | From Associated Press
A mildly retarded teenager was sentenced to three years in prison Friday for the drowning of an autistic 5-year-old boy who prosecutors say was shoved into a canal and left to die. Gorman Roberts, 18, was convicted of manslaughter for the Feb. 10 killing. Prosecutors said he laughed as the boy, Jordan Payne, died in the weed-filled waterway not far from his father's home in Pompano Beach. The defense said Jordan, who was unable to talk or swim, slipped during a tussle.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 1991 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A Gato Barbieri performance is not so much a jazz concert as it is a geothermal incident. The Argentine tenor saxophonist certainly has his jazz credentials, having worked with a range spanning Lalo Schifrin and avant garde trumpeter Don Cherry before taking off on his own in 1969. But the sound pouring from his instrument's bell at the Coach House Friday evening was nothing short of a volcanic eruption. The U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 1993
It's school time again, and even those without children are reminded of that by the big yellow buses back on the street and the increase in traffic. It's all part of the excitement--and anxiety--that a new school year in Los Angeles brings. Los Angeles Unified School District, still feeling the effects of crippling budget problems and a bitter labor dispute, has openings for 650 teachers. Many teachers left the district after a 10% pay cut.
NEWS
November 17, 1994 | MARK CHALON SMITH, Mark Chalon Smith is a free-lance writer who regularly covers theater for the Times Orange County Edition. and
Much of the interest in "Loulou," Maurice Pialat's 1980 movie about hard-nosed romance, comes from watching French stars Gerard Depardieu and Isabelle Huppert at earlier, less commercial plateaus in their careers. Pialat, a former painter known for the earnest realism of his films, tells the story of Nelly (Huppert) and Loulou (Depardieu), a pair of lovers who connect despite the disadvantage of having little in common besides a flash point of sexual attraction.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 1995 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It was business as usual at the Monterey Festival over the weekend. The venerable event celebrated its 38th installment with a characteristic array of music that included everything from Dixieland and be-bop to mainstream and acid jazz. What was missing was any real sense of innovation.
NEWS
September 9, 1993 | MARK CHALON SMITH, Mark Chalon Smith regularly writes about film for the Times Orange County Edition.
Movie critic Pauline Kael is not known for gushing, but when "Last Tango in Paris" came out in 1972, she went into an uncustomary swoon. In a long piece in the New Yorker that was as much essay as critique, she wrote that Bernardo Bertolucci's film "has made the strongest impression on me in almost 20 years of reviewing." The picture caused more than a sensation with the formidable Ms. Kael.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 1998 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
This year marks the 30th anniversary of trombonist Rob McConnell's Boss Brass, the powerhouse big band known for its smart arranging and sterling play. "But I guess it was 32 years ago when the idea first came," Grammy-winner McConnell explained in a recent phone call from his home outside Toronto. McConnell headlines Sunday when the West Coast Jazz Party concludes its three-night stay at the Irvine Marriott.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 1994 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
"Savage Nights," the born-to-be-controversial French film, teaches several lessons, most of them unintentional. * It shows how a sensation in one culture can turn wearing in another, that a story nominally about AIDS may be about something else entirely and, contrary to what so many movies have indicated, that having a fatal illness does not necessarily ennoble the person involved.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2001 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON, CHICAGO TRIBUNE
Without much apparent fuss, one of the last great movie taboos is being tossed to the winds. Recently, in film after film from France and Scandinavia, the boundaries between hard-core pornography and regular art-house movie fare have been all but erased. In "Intimacy," a new, unreleased-in-the-U.S. British film from French director Patrice Chereau, a taxi driver's wife and a barman meet regularly for a Wednesday-afternoon rendezvous in the barman's flat.
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