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Marie Antoinette

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2012 | By Mark Olsen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
French filmmaker Benoît Jacquot's"Farewell, My Queen,"based on the novel by Chantal Thomas, finds a new angle on an infamous monarch. Set almost entirely within the walls of the great Palace of Versailles, the film, which opened in Los Angeles on Friday, focuses specifically on four days in July 1789 as the French Revolution picks up momentum. The drama captures the crumbling of the aristocracy set against the intrigues of Marie Antoinette's relationships with two women: Duchess Gabrielle de Polignac and the queen's personal reader, the young servant girl Sidonie Laborde.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2012 | By Kai Maristed, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Society can turn cruel and bloodthirsty toward those at the top. Julius Caesar, Mary Queen of Scots, Mahatma Gandhi, Presidents Lincoln and Kennedy … the list is so long, we can't be expected to remember every victim. But why do certain deaths emerge as iconic, always fascinating to new generations? Are we eager to see the greatest possible distance one soul can travel from a life of unimaginable glamour to an end in utter pain and humiliation? That might explain why no story remains more magnetic than the downfall of Marie Antoinette, wife of Louis XVI, roi de France.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2006
A big thanks for the wonderful pieces on Marie Antoinette ["What's All This About Conceit and Cake" and "More to the Story After 200 Years of Bad Press," Oct. 22]. They were informative and first-rate. A friend in Canada saw the film at a fundraiser for breast cancer research. He said the audience of 1,500 stood and applauded the screen. According to him, the Italian woman who designed the costumes deserves an Academy Award hands down. He is sparse in praise as a rule, so I take it as a ringing endorsement.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2012 | By Mark Olsen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
French filmmaker Benoît Jacquot's"Farewell, My Queen,"based on the novel by Chantal Thomas, finds a new angle on an infamous monarch. Set almost entirely within the walls of the great Palace of Versailles, the film, which opened in Los Angeles on Friday, focuses specifically on four days in July 1789 as the French Revolution picks up momentum. The drama captures the crumbling of the aristocracy set against the intrigues of Marie Antoinette's relationships with two women: Duchess Gabrielle de Polignac and the queen's personal reader, the young servant girl Sidonie Laborde.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2012 | By Kai Maristed, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Society can turn cruel and bloodthirsty toward those at the top. Julius Caesar, Mary Queen of Scots, Mahatma Gandhi, Presidents Lincoln and Kennedy … the list is so long, we can't be expected to remember every victim. But why do certain deaths emerge as iconic, always fascinating to new generations? Are we eager to see the greatest possible distance one soul can travel from a life of unimaginable glamour to an end in utter pain and humiliation? That might explain why no story remains more magnetic than the downfall of Marie Antoinette, wife of Louis XVI, roi de France.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 1988 | KEVIN THOMAS, Times Staff Writer
"Marie Antoinette" (1938), which screens tonight at 8 at the County Museum of Art's Bing Theater as part of its "Hollywood and History: Costume Design in Film" series, is a revelation. It offers a superb studio re-creation of the grandeur and decadence of the court of Versailles and remarkably shaded portrayals by Norma Shearer as Marie Antoinette--frustrated, frivolous but finally gallant and brave--and Robert Morley as the homely, pathologically shy Louis XVI.
NEWS
April 10, 2003 | Carolyn Patricia Scott, Times Staff Writer
"Let them eat cake!" She never said it. The 18th century queen of France, Marie Antoinette, has been credited with that callous remark -- which, according to legend, so outraged the masses that it set off the French Revolution -- for more than 200 years. Of course, the Austrian-born Marie had her faults. But of politics, she knew little and cared less. Tonight's "Biography" (8 p.m., A&E) explores the misconduct myths that dogged the ill-fated queen from the beginning of her reign.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2007 | Dennis Lim, Special to The Times
MADE nearly 30 years apart, the psychedelic London psychodrama "Performance" and the sugary Versailles romp "Marie Antoinette" -- both out on DVD this week -- have a surprising amount in common. Both concern role-playing games and identity formation. Both are sensual pinnacles of high-aesthete decadence. Both inject rock-star glamour into incongruous genres: the gangster film and the costume drama. And both were perceived as easy targets for a critical drubbing.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2006 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
WHEN you are the third generation of a celebrated Hollywood family, when your father's an eminent director, people tend to underestimate you. It's been happening to Sofia Coppola all her life, and, frankly, it's fine by her. "I think it's an advantage," she says, smiling. "If people don't expect much, even though you have to work harder to prove you're not a spoiled brat, if you just do OK it's considered good. I like being under the radar.
BOOKS
October 21, 2001 | CARA MIA DiMASSA, Cara Mia diMassa is a staff writer for The Times
On the day that 14-year-old Maria Antonia of Austria became Marie Antoinette of France, she arrived at a small island in the Rhine River on the border of those two countries. The island, neither French nor Austrian, seemed a fitting spot for the ceremony at hand.
NEWS
December 30, 2011 | By Seema Mehta
Speaking to supporters at a chilly outdoor rally, Mitt Romney on Friday sought to cast President Obama as out of touch with the economic pain being felt by average Americans. “He's in Hawaii right now. We're in the cold, in the rain, in the wind because we care about America,” Romney said, speaking in the parking lot of a grocery store. “He just finished his 90th round of golf. We have 25 million Americans who are out of work, stopped looking for work or are underemployed. Home values have come down.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2010 | By Chris Lee, Los Angeles Times
To hear Sofia Coppola explain it, the genesis for her drama "Somewhere" ? an episodic tone poem about celebrity and fatherhood in modern Hollywood that reaches theaters Wednesday ? can be pin-pointed to a personal place: the intersection of intimately observed family experiences and tabloid fabulism. Early reviewers have had a field day reading levels of cinema-as-confessional into "Somewhere," which won the Golden Lion for best film at the Venice International Film Festival this year.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 2010
SERIES Dad Camp: The expectant couples learn to keep the romance alive in this new episode of the reality series (11 a.m., 9 and 10:30 p.m. VH1). Come Dine With Me: Amateur chefs compete to see who can host the best dinner party in this new reality series (6 and 9 p.m. BBC America). The Choir: This new reality series charts a music teacher's efforts to put together a vocal ensemble at a British high school (7 and 10 p.m. BBC America). Locked Up Abroad: The dark days of Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein's regime are revisited in this new installment (7 and 10 p.m. National Geographic)
OPINION
March 6, 2009
Re "Shifting tax burden redefines 'class war,' " column, March 4 Michael Hiltzik quotes former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee as saying, "Lenin and Stalin would love this stuff." I would counter that for the last eight years, Marie Antoinette has been revived with the observation often attributed to her, "Let them eat cake," as those who earn 70 times what I do look down from their ivory towers at us, the unwashed masses. It's a good thing this isn't France of yesteryear, or it would be "Off with their heads!"
IMAGE
March 1, 2009 | Carla Hall
They came already shod in Christian Louboutin. At home, they have dozens, even 100 pairs of the French designer's shoes, some encased in special walls in their closets. They are connoisseurs of his style quirks -- the voluptuous hidden platform, the signature red sole, the vertiginous heel. Few of his devotees wear them at less than 4 or 5 inches.
OPINION
December 18, 2008
Re "Throw a shoe, become a legend," Dec. 16 Let's please acknowledge the mixed reaction among citizens of the U.S. and countries the world over -- not only in the Arab world -- to Muntather Zaidi's gesture. He has many fans outside the region, it not being lost on us that his statement was made on behalf of widows, orphans and the dead from every nation drawn into this disastrous conflict -- and even for those spared any personal involvement who nevertheless share his disgust. Congratulations are in order to Zaidi for having said exactly what needed to be said at that moment, succinctly and unforgettably.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 2006 | Carina Chocano, Times Staff Writer
Sofia Coppola's "Marie Antoinette" opens with a shot of the last queen of France reclining on a chaise while a maid tends to her feet, surrounded by a parapet of pastries. On the soundtrack, the 1980s post-punk band Gang of Four belts out its class-baiting, anti-consumerist anthem, "Natural's Not in It." ("The problem of leisure / what to do for pleasure," it goes.) A confection herself, Marie Antoinette (Kirsten Dunst) selects a pastel-colored macaroon from a tray and takes a nibble.
NEWS
November 22, 2006 | Elizabeth Snead, Special to The Times
IF you want to know what it's like to walk a mile in Marie Antoinette's shoes, you have two choices. You can stroll around in a high-priced pair of Manolo Blahnik reproductions of 18th century French court footwear, made for Sofia Coppola's "Marie Antoinette" and available in the designer's European boutiques. Or you can hop into a pair of all-American pink Converse Chuck Taylor All Star sneakers.
NEWS
November 16, 2008 | Aron Heller, Heller writes for the Associated Press.
It took time, but Israeli police detectives have cracked one of the country's greatest crimes -- the legendary heist of a priceless clock collection from a Jerusalem museum a quarter of a century ago. The 1983 theft, the costliest in Israel's history, saw 106 timepieces worth millions of dollars disappear from the L.A. Mayer Museum for Islamic Art. Among them was a pocket watch made for France's queen, Marie Antoinette, that museum officials value...
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2008 | From the Associated Press
The Petit Trianon, the mini-chateau at Versailles that French queen Marie Antoinette used as her refuge, reopened Wednesday after a yearlong, $7.34-million renovation funded by Swiss watchmaker Breguet, which once made a timepiece for the queen. Among other improvements, electric wiring was fixed, more rooms opened to the public and a garden pavilion refurbished. Curators said they wanted to avoid a stuffy museum feel, making it seem as though the 18th century French queen and her entourage had just stepped away for a moment.
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