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Marijuana Laws

NATIONAL
December 10, 2012 | By Matt Pearce
Although it's now legal to smoke weed in Colorado, you still can't secretly feed it to your classmates. Two University of Colorado Boulder students face multiple felony charges after the marijuana-laced brownies they brought to class put their professor in the hospital and sickened seven classmates, campus police said Sunday. November's voter-approved Amendment 64 made Colorado's marijuana laws some of the most relaxed in the nation, but Thomas Ricardo Cunningham, 21, and Mary Elizabeth Essa, 19, may not get much help from it. The pair have been arrested on suspicion of planning and intentionally committing second-degree assault and inducing consumption of controlled substances by fraudulent means.
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NEWS
December 29, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
The Drug Enforcement Administration rejected a recommendation today that marijuana be reclassified for use as a prescription medicine to treat patients suffering from glaucoma, cancer and other diseases. DEA Administrator John Lawn announced the order, saying the hallucinogenic drug will remain "under the strictest level of federal control."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2013 | By Maura Dolan, Los Angeles Times
SAN FRANCISCO - The California Supreme Court appeared inclined Tuesday to uphold municipal bans against medical marijuana dispensaries. Meeting for oral arguments, the state high court considered the legality of a ban on dispensaries by the city of Riverside. Several justices noted that the state Constitution gives cities wide policing power over land use and suggested that the state's medical marijuana laws have not undercut that authority. "The Legislature knows how to say 'Thou Shall Not Ban Dispensaries,' " Justice Ming W. Chin said.
NEWS
November 13, 2012 | By Dan Turner
Voters in Washington and Colorado didn't just pass historic measures legalizing recreational marijuana use last week, they blew smoke in the face of Atty. Gen. Eric Holder and, by extension, President Obama. The bud stops at your desks, gentlemen. Since the vote, legal experts and media analysts have focused speculation on how the feds will crack down on these two rogue states and show them who's boss. Will the Department of Justice file a lawsuit, seeking a ruling that federal law prevails and nullifying the results of the election?
OPINION
July 16, 2010 | By Mark A.R. Kleiman
Now that California's billion-dollar "medical marijuana" industry and its affiliated "recommendationists" have made marijuana legally available to any Californian with $75 and the willingness to tell a doctor that he sometimes has trouble sleeping, why not go all the way and just legalize the stuff for recreational use as proposed in Proposition 19 on the November ballot? Then we could tax it and regulate it, eliminating the illicit market and the need for law enforcement against pot growers.
NATIONAL
August 29, 2013 | By Rick Rojas
SEATTLE - When the Justice Department announced Thursday that it would not interfere with the enforcement of voter-approved laws that allow recreational pot use in Washington state and Colorado, leaders on both sides of the issue had the same thought: The policy will probably encourage other states to consider similar laws. For supporters of the state laws, the policy marked a milestone that they believe will boost their efforts to legalize marijuana in other states, including Oregon, Nevada, Massachusetts and Alaska.
OPINION
January 14, 2010 | By Tamar Todd
The Times raises two objections in its Jan. 13 editorial, "Legalize pot? Not so fast," to a proposed state bill that would legalize, tax and regulate the sale of marijuana to adults 21 and older. First, the editorial claims that the purpose of AB 390 is "simply" to raise tax revenue for the state. This alone, The Times says, does not justify what it calls "rash and reckless" public policy. Second, The Times writes that California "does not have the authority to take such a step."
OPINION
June 6, 2007
Re "Not enough marijuana," editorial, May 31 One only hopes that the Drug Enforcement Administration sees the irony in Judge Mary Ellen Bittner's decision to allow for the private production of cannabis for government-approved research. While unfettered access to marijuana is only a phone call away for millions of U.S. teens, it remains out of reach for qualified researchers who wish to study its therapeutic utility in clinical trials. Chalk up another victory for America's misguided pot policies.
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