Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsMarijuana Laws
IN THE NEWS

Marijuana Laws

OPINION
June 6, 2007
Re "Not enough marijuana," editorial, May 31 One only hopes that the Drug Enforcement Administration sees the irony in Judge Mary Ellen Bittner's decision to allow for the private production of cannabis for government-approved research. While unfettered access to marijuana is only a phone call away for millions of U.S. teens, it remains out of reach for qualified researchers who wish to study its therapeutic utility in clinical trials. Chalk up another victory for America's misguided pot policies.
Advertisement
OPINION
May 22, 2008
Re "Organ prospects go up in smoke," May 19 Transplant centers need to answer to science about denying organs to medical marijuana patients. Two studies, the latest released just last month at the University of Ottawa, have found that treatment with marijuana or cannabinoids actually helps hepatitis patients, perhaps because it helps them better tolerate their drug treatment regimens. This being so, denial of livers to marijuana patients would seem to constitute malpractice. Dale H. Gieringer San Francisco The writer is the California director for the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 2012 | By Joe Mozingo, Los Angeles Times
The federal government is moving to shut down the nation's largest and highest-profile medical marijuana dispensary operation, filing papers to seize properties in Oakland and San Jose where Harborside Health Center does business. Copies of the federal Complaint for Forfeiture were taped to the front doors of the two dispensaries Tuesday, alleging that they were "operating in violation of federal law. " Medical marijuana advocates, as well as some state and local officials, decried the action, saying it hurts patients in legitimate need of the drug and breaks repeated promises by President Obama's Justice Department that it was targeting only operations near schools and parks or otherwise in violation of the state's laws.
NATIONAL
December 10, 2012 | By Matt Pearce
Although it's now legal to smoke weed in Colorado, you still can't secretly feed it to your classmates. Two University of Colorado Boulder students face multiple felony charges after the marijuana-laced brownies they brought to class put their professor in the hospital and sickened seven classmates, campus police said Sunday. November's voter-approved Amendment 64 made Colorado's marijuana laws some of the most relaxed in the nation, but Thomas Ricardo Cunningham, 21, and Mary Elizabeth Essa, 19, may not get much help from it. The pair have been arrested on suspicion of planning and intentionally committing second-degree assault and inducing consumption of controlled substances by fraudulent means.
NEWS
August 29, 1989 | MARK A. STEIN, Times Staff Writer
James W. Smith believes that California's marijuana laws are anachronistic and that the priority given to enforcement of those laws in this liberal college town is just plain dumb. He has already organized a political base and is busy collecting signatures to put an initiative on the Berkeley city ballot next June aimed at shaking up city officials' attitudes toward pot.
BUSINESS
September 19, 2012 | Bloomberg News
Warren Buffett and Bill and Melinda Gates' initiative to get billionaires to pledge at least half their wealth to charity signed on 11 new families with a variety of causes and interests. They causes they support include medical research, science museums, "Canadianism" and the legalization of marijuana. The list of billionaires joining the Giving Pledge initiative includes Intel Corp. co-founder Gordon Moore and his wife, Betty; Progressive Corp. Chairman Peter B. Lewis; and Netflix Inc. Chief Executive Reed Hastings and his wife, Patty Quillin; according to a statement Tuesday from the campaign.
NATIONAL
January 8, 2014 | By Tina Susman
NEW YORK - Gov. Andrew Cuomo took the first step Wednesday toward making New York the 21st state to legalize marijuana for medical purposes, announcing plans to let some hospitals distribute the drug to patients with “serious illnesses.” The announcement in his state-of-the-state speech represents a shift for Cuomo, who had opposed legalizing the drug for any use. But most New Yorkers want their state to follow the lead of others that have...
NEWS
November 13, 2012 | By Dan Turner
Voters in Washington and Colorado didn't just pass historic measures legalizing recreational marijuana use last week, they blew smoke in the face of Atty. Gen. Eric Holder and, by extension, President Obama. The bud stops at your desks, gentlemen. Since the vote, legal experts and media analysts have focused speculation on how the feds will crack down on these two rogue states and show them who's boss. Will the Department of Justice file a lawsuit, seeking a ruling that federal law prevails and nullifying the results of the election?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1995 | ALAN EYERLY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A seldom-used law to keep convicted drug offenders away from local parks was repealed by the City Council on Tuesday, avoiding a costly civil rights legal battle. The ordinance, possibly the only one of its kind in the nation, prohibited people convicted of certain drug-related crimes from entering any of the city's 40 parks for three years after their conviction or release from custody. The law was used four times since the council adopted it in 1993.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|