Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsMarijuana Laws
IN THE NEWS

Marijuana Laws

OPINION
January 14, 2010 | By Tamar Todd
The Times raises two objections in its Jan. 13 editorial, "Legalize pot? Not so fast," to a proposed state bill that would legalize, tax and regulate the sale of marijuana to adults 21 and older. First, the editorial claims that the purpose of AB 390 is "simply" to raise tax revenue for the state. This alone, The Times says, does not justify what it calls "rash and reckless" public policy. Second, The Times writes that California "does not have the authority to take such a step."
Advertisement
OPINION
June 6, 2007
Re "Not enough marijuana," editorial, May 31 One only hopes that the Drug Enforcement Administration sees the irony in Judge Mary Ellen Bittner's decision to allow for the private production of cannabis for government-approved research. While unfettered access to marijuana is only a phone call away for millions of U.S. teens, it remains out of reach for qualified researchers who wish to study its therapeutic utility in clinical trials. Chalk up another victory for America's misguided pot policies.
NEWS
November 13, 2012 | By Dan Turner
Voters in Washington and Colorado didn't just pass historic measures legalizing recreational marijuana use last week, they blew smoke in the face of Atty. Gen. Eric Holder and, by extension, President Obama. The bud stops at your desks, gentlemen. Since the vote, legal experts and media analysts have focused speculation on how the feds will crack down on these two rogue states and show them who's boss. Will the Department of Justice file a lawsuit, seeking a ruling that federal law prevails and nullifying the results of the election?
OPINION
May 22, 2008
Re "Organ prospects go up in smoke," May 19 Transplant centers need to answer to science about denying organs to medical marijuana patients. Two studies, the latest released just last month at the University of Ottawa, have found that treatment with marijuana or cannabinoids actually helps hepatitis patients, perhaps because it helps them better tolerate their drug treatment regimens. This being so, denial of livers to marijuana patients would seem to constitute malpractice. Dale H. Gieringer San Francisco The writer is the California director for the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws.
NEWS
January 11, 2012 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Marijuana smoke does not damage lungs in the same manner as tobacco smoke, according to a study released Tuesday. But that conclusion probably will not change minds as to whether the drug should be legalized. The study found that smoking marijuana on an occasional basis does not appear to significantly damage the lungs. Published in the Journal of the American Medical Assn., the paper supports previous research that has also failed to find a link between low or moderate exposure to marijuana smoke and lung damage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 2010 | By John Hoeffel, Los Angeles Times
Supporters of legalizing marijuana in California spent the day after the election laying the groundwork to rebound from their 54%-to-46% defeat and return to the ballot in two years. "We have a debate that was just heard around the world, and the conversation has only just begun," said Dale Sky Jones, a spokeswoman for the Proposition 19 campaign. Although California voters did not buy the argument that marijuana should be legalized like alcohol, many agreed that it should be taxed like it. Voters in 10 cities overwhelmingly approved taxes on sales of medical and recreational pot. On Wednesday, the Los Angeles City Council instructed the city attorney to draft a measure for the March ballot that would ask voters to approve a tax on medical marijuana.
NEWS
August 29, 1989 | MARK A. STEIN, Times Staff Writer
James W. Smith believes that California's marijuana laws are anachronistic and that the priority given to enforcement of those laws in this liberal college town is just plain dumb. He has already organized a political base and is busy collecting signatures to put an initiative on the Berkeley city ballot next June aimed at shaking up city officials' attitudes toward pot.
BUSINESS
September 19, 2012 | Bloomberg News
Warren Buffett and Bill and Melinda Gates' initiative to get billionaires to pledge at least half their wealth to charity signed on 11 new families with a variety of causes and interests. They causes they support include medical research, science museums, "Canadianism" and the legalization of marijuana. The list of billionaires joining the Giving Pledge initiative includes Intel Corp. co-founder Gordon Moore and his wife, Betty; Progressive Corp. Chairman Peter B. Lewis; and Netflix Inc. Chief Executive Reed Hastings and his wife, Patty Quillin; according to a statement Tuesday from the campaign.
NATIONAL
January 8, 2014 | By Tina Susman
NEW YORK - Gov. Andrew Cuomo took the first step Wednesday toward making New York the 21st state to legalize marijuana for medical purposes, announcing plans to let some hospitals distribute the drug to patients with “serious illnesses.” The announcement in his state-of-the-state speech represents a shift for Cuomo, who had opposed legalizing the drug for any use. But most New Yorkers want their state to follow the lead of others that have...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1995 | ALAN EYERLY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A seldom-used law to keep convicted drug offenders away from local parks was repealed by the City Council on Tuesday, avoiding a costly civil rights legal battle. The ordinance, possibly the only one of its kind in the nation, prohibited people convicted of certain drug-related crimes from entering any of the city's 40 parks for three years after their conviction or release from custody. The law was used four times since the council adopted it in 1993.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|