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June 2, 1998 | STEPHEN LEMONS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A beautiful, ethereal creature not quite of this world--that's what artist Mariko Mori appears to be as she steps from behind an alcove in her eponymous exhibition at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Dressed in sleek, futuristic white garb with a small, sparkling silver pocketbook slung across her shoulder, she seems to have just descended from some unseen spaceship of her own design.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 1998 | STEPHEN LEMONS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A beautiful, ethereal creature not quite of this world--that's what artist Mariko Mori appears to be as she steps from behind an alcove in her eponymous exhibition at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Dressed in sleek, futuristic white garb with a small, sparkling silver pocketbook slung across her shoulder, she seems to have just descended from some unseen spaceship of her own design.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 1998 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
"Nirvana," the giddy new installation at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art by Tokyo- and New York-based artist Mariko Mori, seamlessly fuses East with West, tradition with iconoclasm, and ancient philosophy with modern ideals, all in heady and ingratiating ways.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 1998 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
"Nirvana," the giddy new installation at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art by Tokyo- and New York-based artist Mariko Mori, seamlessly fuses East with West, tradition with iconoclasm, and ancient philosophy with modern ideals, all in heady and ingratiating ways.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 1998
"Contemporary Projects: Mariko Mori, Nirvana," a large-scale meditative installation utilizing cutting-edge technology, opens today at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. The Japanese artist explores the importance of tradition in contemporary Japanese society through the environment's four billboard-sized photographic elements, 3-D video and a lotus-shaped acrylic sculpture or "enlightenment capsule." * "Contemporary Projects: Mariko Mori."
MAGAZINE
May 14, 2000 | MARY MELTON
They could have hung a nice David Hockney. Maybe an Ed Ruscha. But when the Italian clothier Costume National recently held an opening-night party for its Melrose Avenue store, owners Ennio and Carlo Capasa wanted art with a little more movement. So they popped a museum-quality video into the VCR. The one-night-only video installation, entitled "Miko No Inori," is the work of much-toasted Japanese multimedia artist Mariko Mori.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 2006 | Scott Timberg, Times Staff Writer
SUPERDEALER Larry Gagosian talks about the "thin," speculative art market of the '80s but isn't worried about a bubble as prices heat up this time around. Connecticut collector Peter M. Brant says he keeps an eye out for artists the critics don't like, since it's often a sign something interesting is happening with their work. New York art dealer Barbara Gladstone, who helped build Matthew Barney's career, laments the shallow pursuit of younger and younger artists.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 1997 | SUSAN KANDEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As far as huge, international art festivals go, the Venice Biennale is more quixotic than most. Still organized around its original, 19th century concept of art as the expression of the nation-state, the Biennale pushes a territorial agenda in the midst of its own rampant pluralism.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2009 | Suzanne Muchnic
Imagine a museum that boasts the largest collection of modern and contemporary art in Europe. Now imagine that an intrepid female curator puts all the men's work in storage and fills the permanent collection galleries with a new version of 20th and early 21st century art history, the one that women created. Would she emerge as a champion, finally proving that women artists are as good as -- or better than -- the guys?
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2003 | Colin Joyce, Special to The Times
Few museums in the world can rival the location of the Mori Art Museum. Situated atop Tokyo's most imposing skyscraper in the middle of the city's trendiest area, this prestigious premise within the shimmering 54-story Mori Tower is no mere whim. It is intended to send the message to Japan that modern art is important. In Japan, interest in contemporary art has never been high, lagging far behind the enduring popularity of the Impressionists and other renowned artists from the past.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2007 | Suzanne Muchnic
TWO generations of artists have emerged since the 1970s, when feminists made themselves heard, but discussions about the importance and meaning of their legacy continue. The Times raised the issue with artists of these later generations at various stages of development. Here are some of their thoughts: -- Carla Gannis, 36, New York; MFA, Boston University I grew up in a small town in North Carolina with a very strong mother. I was in beauty pageants. I was a cheerleader and homecoming queen.
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