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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 2001 | MASSIE RITSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the wind propelled the Robert C. Seamans toward Santa Catalina Island, Rudy Vigil controlled the helm of the 135-foot, $8.1-million ship. Rudy is 17, with a ring in his eyebrow and a stud in his nose. The last thing the high school senior from Wilmington steered was a Honda Civic. Rudy was seasick for most of the 10 days he and 20 other students cruised the California coast with the Sea Education Assn.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 2013 | By Dianne de Guzman
For those who don't have much time to visit an aquarium or to enjoy marine life out in its natural environment, photographer Reynaldo C. Obrero has got you covered with today's photograph. Obrero snapped this action shot in black and white at the Aquarium of the Pacific in Long Beach, capturing the light in the water while a group of fish swam upward. "One of the most striking things you'll see when you first walk into the entrance is the three-story Blue Cavern exhibit," Obrero wrote in an email.
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NEWS
April 1, 1998 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a chief boatswain's mate yelled one of the most unusual orders ever heard aboard ship--"Release the whale!"--the California gray whale named J.J. was lowered gently into calm seas Tuesday two miles off the San Diego coast. The 19,200-pound, 31-foot-long mammal--the largest ever kept in captivity--initially began swimming back to San Diego.
NATIONAL
September 13, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
Fish began dying en masse in the waters around Honolulu after hundreds of thousands of gallons of molasses spilled into Honolulu Harbor early this week, and there's nothing officials can do to clean it up. Thousands of fish have died from the sugary sludge. Crabs lay dead along the harbor bottom while more fish floated listlessly, some seeming to gasp above the surface of the water contaminated by the syrupy sweetener. The spill is one of the worst man-made disasters to hit Hawaii in recent memory, officials said, not least because no one has quite seen anything like it. "There's nothing you can do to clean up molasses," said Jeff Hull, a spokesman for Matson Inc., the company responsible for the leak.
SCIENCE
May 10, 2013 | By Julie Cart
Two federal agencies on Friday announced a major review of how seismic testing for oil and gas deposits affects marine mammals and fish in deep waters off the Gulf of Mexico. So-called seismic surveys entail blasts from air guns or other ship-borne devices that send out powerful sound waves that reflect the shape and extent of oil and gas fields under the ocean floor. Industry officials say the practice is necessary for efficient, safe exploration in deep seas. The testing has long been controversial.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 1986 | JON MATSUMOTO
"DIVING FOR PEARLS," New Marines. American. As this EP's title track shows, the Pasadena sextet can write some pretty impressive pop-rock songs. Centered around the aggressive guitar of Pierre Smith and the hard, steady beat of drummer John Chamberlin, "Diving for Pearls" is the type of track that can propel a band from the underground to the foreground.
NEWS
August 16, 2012 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
The big heat gripping Southern California leaves me daydreaming about big ocean adventures, like this one in Honolulu. It's described as an underwater scooter and snorkeling experience in Maunalua Bay, where you can see fish and sea turtles up close. For a limited time, the excursion is on sale for $99 per person, courtesy of Travelzoo . The deal: The Travelzoo discount cuts the cost of this two-hour excursion in half. As always, you purchase a voucher that can be redeemed with the dive company Island Water Sports based in Honolulu.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1996
We are two students from Shorecliffs Middle School in San Clemente. We have been studying the future of marine life in the face of the growing water pollution problem. We would like to express our concern regarding this topic. Although it is illegal to dump any trash into the ocean, the growing number of plastics in the ocean have threatened marine life. Sea gulls, seals, fish, and other marine animals often become entangled in the synthetic nets of fishermen and plastic six-pack rings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1996
I don't see the need for the Malibu Marine Refuge ("A Line in the Sand," Aug. 6), or for a fishing ban in these waters. I have been diving in Malibu for five years and have found no evidence that there is an overfishing problem. The real environmental problems of the Malibu coast are sewage and encroaching development. Breakwaters contribute to the erosion that robs beaches of their sand. Houses are built on stilts all the way to the waterline. Malibu could be a place where people from Los Angeles enjoy the wonderful Pacific Coast ecosystem, if it were not for the eagerness of the local residents to block access to the beaches.
SCIENCE
August 23, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Masses of plankton, dying as global warming heats the waters off the Seychelles, are threatening marine life in the Indian Ocean tourist haven, a government official said. The decaying plankton depletes the oxygen in sea water and suffocates other marine life. The resulting sludge also turns the Seychelles' turquoise waters green as algae feast on the plankton.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
California communities spend close to half a billion dollars each year trying to prevent litter from mucking up the sensitive ecosystems of rivers, lakes and coastal waters, according to a report released recently by the Natural Resources Defense Council. Yet urban runoff remains a serious problem for fish, birds, turtles and marine mammals that ingest it: clogged intestines, restricted movement, suffocation, loss of vital nutrients and starvation. Then there is the derelict fishing gear - monofilament line, nets, poles, toxic lead sinkers and plastic lures that can last thousands of years - that can become deadly snares for marine life.
SCIENCE
August 28, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
California communities spend close to half a billion dollars each year trying to prevent litter from mucking up the sensitive ecosystems of rivers, lakes and coastal waters, according to a report to be released  Wednesday by the Natural Resources Defense Council. Yet, urban runoff remains a serious problem for fish, birds, turtles and marine mammals that ingest it: clogged intestines, restricted movement, suffocation, loss of vital nutrients, starvation. Then there is the derelict fishing gear -- monofilament line, nets, poles, toxic lead sinkers and plastic lures made to last thousands of years - that can become deadly snares for marine life.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 2013 | Tony Barboza
Below the gently rolling waves off the Palos Verdes Peninsula, a spiny purple menace is ravaging what should be a thriving kelp forest. Millions of sea urchins -- scrawny, diseased and desperate for food -- have overrun a band of the shallow seafloor, devouring kelp and crowding out most all other life at a time the giant green foliage is making a comeback elsewhere along the California coast. In an effort to remedy the situation, scientists and divers will spend the next five years culling the urchins from more than 152 acres of coastal waters degraded years ago by pollution.
SCIENCE
July 25, 2013 | By Tony Barboza
A team of scientists is setting out on a research expedition along the U.S. West Coast to study ocean acidification, the greenhouse gas-driven change in the chemistry of seawater that has been called climate change's “ evil twin .” Chemists and biologists from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration will board the survey ship Fairweather next week, sailing from Canada to Mexico to collect samples of water, algae and plankton,...
TRAVEL
May 26, 2013 | By An Amlotte
BORA BORA, French Polynesia It was just after 6 a.m. when the sound of a ship's horn awakened us. My husband, Jeff, and I looked at each other sleepily, then scrambled to our knees so we could look out the window above our bed. There it was in all its glory: a massive cruise liner that overwhelmed Bora Bora's western lagoon. I felt sorry for the passengers. If the cruise ship that visited the previous day was any indication, the passengers would have only one day here, and that wouldn't be enough.
SCIENCE
May 10, 2013 | By Julie Cart
Two federal agencies on Friday announced a major review of how seismic testing for oil and gas deposits affects marine mammals and fish in deep waters off the Gulf of Mexico. So-called seismic surveys entail blasts from air guns or other ship-borne devices that send out powerful sound waves that reflect the shape and extent of oil and gas fields under the ocean floor. Industry officials say the practice is necessary for efficient, safe exploration in deep seas. The testing has long been controversial.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1988 | DEAN MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
A three-quarter-mile stretch of coastline near Isthmus Cove on Santa Catalina Island, described by marine biologists as having one of the island's richest concentrations of sea life, will be set aside in January as a marine life refuge, state officials said Wednesday. The Department of Fish and Game expects to appoint a director within the next couple of months to ensure that the sanctuary can open by the first of the year, the earliest date allowed under legislation signed by Gov.
TRAVEL
March 10, 2013 | By Brian E. Clark
PROVIDENCIALES, Turks and Caicos Islands - Sixty feet below the surface of the aquamarine western Atlantic, my 12-year-old daughter, Maddie, glided gently along the reef, her arms crossed in Buddha-like meditation. To the left, where the sea dropped off hundreds of feet, a black-tipped shark cruised ominously in the distance. A curious parrot fish, a school of yellow-striped grunts and a bug-eyed squirrel fish swam an arm's length away, perhaps hoping for a handout from our group of six divers and our guide.
NEWS
February 27, 2013 | By Jay Jones
A sub-Mediterranean climate in Canada ? Yes, indeed. And that makes Pender Island , a tranquil spot in British Columbia's Gulf Islands, a multi-season getaway. The destination is full of bed-and-breakfasts and boutiques and offers a bounty of outdoor recreational opportunities. Pender Island is just four miles north of Stuart Island, one of Washington state's San Juan Islands, and is popular with Canadians but little known by Americans. Canada's maple leaf flag flutters in the ocean breezes on what, despite the name, are two islands linked by a narrow, one-lane bridge.
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