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March 12, 1989 | WILLIAM WILSON
The planet seems mired in a global replay of the Middle Ages. Life is plagued by spooky sense that things don't go the way they used to. Danger lurks in unexpected places. Hi, dear, I'm home. Why do your eyes look so glassy? Is that somebody in the kitchen? Moles gnaw blindly at the pilings of civility. A writer in London publishes an irreverent book and half-way 'round the planet an implacable holy man in black calls down death on the infidel.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 2003 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
Italian sculptor Mario Merz, a founder of the Arte Povera, or "poor art," movement whose signature works are igloo-like structures and systematic arrangements of neon letters and numbers, died Sunday at his home in Milan. He was 78. The cause of death was not announced. During the five decades of Merz's artistic career, his work evolved from relatively traditional painting to highly inventive conceptual sculpture.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 2003 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
Italian sculptor Mario Merz, a founder of the Arte Povera, or "poor art," movement whose signature works are igloo-like structures and systematic arrangements of neon letters and numbers, died Sunday at his home in Milan. He was 78. The cause of death was not announced. During the five decades of Merz's artistic career, his work evolved from relatively traditional painting to highly inventive conceptual sculpture.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1989 | WILLIAM WILSON
The planet seems mired in a global replay of the Middle Ages. Life is plagued by spooky sense that things don't go the way they used to. Danger lurks in unexpected places. Hi, dear, I'm home. Why do your eyes look so glassy? Is that somebody in the kitchen? Moles gnaw blindly at the pilings of civility. A writer in London publishes an irreverent book and half-way 'round the planet an implacable holy man in black calls down death on the infidel.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 1989 | ELIZABETH VENANT, Times Staff Writer
Mario Merz stands with his arms crossed, his body thrown slightly back, his white tousled hair swept down his neck. A monumental man, he resembles Rodin's rough-hewn statue of Balzac, an ironic contradiction that Merz would appreciate, since the Italian artist has spent much of his life opposing just such statuary.
NEWS
November 28, 1996
Konrad Fischer, 57, a gallery owner and important dealer in contemporary art. Fischer used his mother's maiden name, Lueg, in his early days as an artist, and attracted notice when he staged a "Demonstration for the Capitalist Realism" and other conceptual projects, with Gerhard Richter, Sigmar Polke and Manfred Kuttner. In 1967, he opened a gallery with his wife, Dorothee, and his first exhibition introduced to Europe the American artist Carl Andres.
NEWS
October 23, 2003 | Louise Roug
Prince Hitachi of Japan will present awards to architect Rem Koolhaas, director Ken Loach, sculptor Mario Merz, painter Bridget Riley and conductor Claudio Abbado at a ceremony in Tokyo today. The Praemium Imperiale international art award, which comes with a diploma, a gold medal and $125,000, rewards extraordinary achievements in the arts. An international jury nominates the candidates and the winners are selected by the Japan Art Assn.
NEWS
July 3, 2003
Awards: British director Ken Loach and Dutch architect Rem Koolhaas join British painter Bridget Riley, Italian sculptor Mario Merz and Italian conductor Claudio Abbado as this year's recipients of the Praemium Imperiale Awards for outstanding achievement in the arts. Tribute: The Venice Film Festival will honor Katharine Hepburn by showing a restored copy of 1955's "Summertime," organizers said Wednesday. The festival runs Aug. 27-Sept. 6.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 1989 | CATHY CURTIS
A divine madness infuses the work of Mario Merz, the Italian artist who seeks a primal wholeness beneath the cold veneer of contemporary society with his impermanent materials, neon lettering, igloos and obsession with numerals. Merz's installation, "Leyden Jar," was created in 1978 for a deconsecrated church in Italy.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2013 | By Leah Ollman
Arte Povera was one of art history's numerous liberation movements, a concerted, multifaceted effort to shake off the dead weight of prior convention. Assigned its name in 1967 by the critic and curator Germano Celant, "poor art" adopted humble, ordinary materials, often butting the organic against the inorganic. It sniffed at the market and institutions. Its leading figures -- Jannis Kounellis, Michelangelo Pistoletto, Mario Merz, Giuseppe Penone among them -- chimed in with enduring resonance to the broad-based call of the day to unify art and life.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 1989 | ELIZABETH VENANT, Times Staff Writer
Mario Merz stands with his arms crossed, his body thrown slightly back, his white tousled hair swept down his neck. A monumental man, he resembles Rodin's rough-hewn statue of Balzac, an ironic contradiction that Merz would appreciate, since the Italian artist has spent much of his life opposing just such statuary.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 1989 | KEVIN ALLMAN
Paul McCartney isn't the only member of his clan involved in arts and entertainment. The celebrity Gallery in Brentwood is presenting an exhibit of limited-edition photographs and silk-screens by Michael McCartney--Paul's brother.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2002 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
War rages. Terrorists conspire. Repression and abuse proliferate. Economies shiver. The world is coming apart at the seams. Today the chaotic tumult of the 1960s seems less remote than it has for some time.
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