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ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2012 | By Nicole Sperling
The Toronto International Film Festival will end its 10-day gathering with the world premiere of Paul Andrew Williams' feel-good movie "Song for Marion. " "Song for Marion" stars Gemma Arterton, Vanessa Redgrave and Terrence Stamp and centers on a curmudgeonly older man (Stamp) who is coaxed out of his shell by a young choir director. The announcement of the closing night film comes along with news that Paul Thomas Anderson's "The Master" starring Joaquin Phoenix and Philip Seymour Hoffman will have its North American premiere at the Sept.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2014 | By Gary Goldstein
"Blood Ties" is a largely engrossing drama set in 1974 that works better as an emotional study of brothers on flip sides of the law than as the Sidney Lumet-type crime saga it strives to be. Still, there's a heft to the proceedings that keeps us invested even when the story's various strands start to unravel. Billy Crudup is superb as Frank, an upright New York cop whose older brother, Chris (Clive Owen), is released from prison after serving a lengthy stint for murder. It's a testy reunion for the mismatched pair as old wounds quickly resurface and Chris' foray into honest work proves short-lived . The upshot: Chris' return to his violent, criminal ways eventually forces Frank to choose between honoring his badge or his family.
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NEWS
August 2, 1987 | SHARON COHEN, Associated Press
A two-lane blacktop curves through woods and waters, through a remote refuge for deer, ducks and quail. At the end of the road, a gray concrete fortress looms. This is the U.S. Penitentiary at Marion, home to some of America's most dangerous criminals. The squat prison is surrounded by eight bulletproof guard towers and a pair of 14-foot-high fences topped with curling razor wire, Nowhere in America is there a tougher federal prison.
NEWS
December 5, 2013 | By Susan Denley
Marion Cotillard wore a striking dress from Dior Haute Couture to the "Waltz With Monica" premiere at the 13th Marrakech International Film Festival on Wednesday. The elegant dress adds a touch of whimsy with orange-and-black-striped silk layered under a blue silk overdress -- kind of a grown-up pinafore. And stripes have been a "thing" on recent red carpets, Los Angeles Times' Fashion Critic Booth Moore says. [Los Angeles Times] Dame Edna Everage (aka comic Barry Humphries)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1996
The more the Republican aspirants bark and snarl at one another, the more Bill Clinton becomes presidential. MARION D. BLYTH Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 1989
To the people of Los Angeles: You've had more snow this year than we've had the entire season. Come visit sunny Iowa. DAVID V. WENDELL Marion, Iowa
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 1986
Comments by critics of the anti-nuclear movement have suggested that justice may have been better served by a stronger and stiffer sentence for Marion Pack, executive director of the Alliance for Survival in Orange County. To clarify one point, Mrs. Pack chose the jail sentence (rather than the $500 fine) because she did not have the money to pay the fine, not for publicity! The survival of the alliance depends upon Marion Pack and her family. With the help of supporters and Mrs. Pack's salary, the organization continues, from month to month.
NEWS
February 28, 1985 | From Reuters
An elderly spinster kept the corpse of her sister seated for almost two months in front of the television she was apparently watching when she died. Police, acting on a tip from suspicious neighbors, forced their way into the Hoyle sisters' home Wednesday night and found the body of 67-year-old Marion wrapped in a blanket and seated in front of the television. Her 71-year-old sister Florence was carried out by police and is undergoing psychiatric treatment.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2012 | By Sam Adams
Five years ago, Julie Delpy wrote, directed and starred in the amiably shaggy romantic comedy "2 Days in Paris," in which she and Adam Goldberg's young lovers went to France for a visit. Although the movie gods were not exactly crying out for a sequel, superfluousness is one of the virtues of the new follow-up, "2 Days in New York," a giddy and largely consequence-free romp that sends a group of out-of-place Frenchmen and woman into the maelstrom of Manhattan. Delpy's harried artist Marion is now raising the child she had with her ex-boyfriend (Goldberg's "Paris" character)
NEWS
October 28, 1997
Laurence Weinberg, 87, copyright attorney and prolific musician. Educated at Stanford and its school of law, Weinberg was a lifelong fund-raiser for the university and a member of the law school's board of visitors. He was the author of "The Financing of Television Productions" and worked successively for Universal Studios, the law firms of Loeb & Loeb and Stapleton, Weinberg & Isen, and in solo practice.
NEWS
December 4, 2013 | By Booth Moore, Los Angeles Times Fashion Critic
From bateau-style T-shirts, to Marc Jacobs' spring 2012 graphic Mod black-and-white runway extravaganza and beyond, stripes are the fashion trend that just won't end. They've been hot on the streets and at retail for going on four years now. But whereas most celebs would have shied away from wearing potentially unflattering lines on the red carpet, that's not the case now. Tuesday night at a screening of “American Hustle” in Los Angeles,...
SPORTS
October 30, 2013 | By Eric Pincus
How often can a player shoot 1 of 11 from the field and still play a big role in a victory? On Tuesday night, Lakers forward Wesley Johnson scored just three points in 20½ minutes and even missed a dunk attempt), but his defense on Blake Griffin in the fourth quarter was a big reason for an  opening night victory against the Clippers. "I'm happy we got the win," Johnson said with a big smile after the game.  "I'm going to do everything that will help this team win. "One of these nights, I [may]
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 2013 | By Joseph Serna and Richard Winton
Former rap impresario Marion “Suge” Knight was arrested by Los Angeles police Wednesday morning after being pulled over for a traffic violation, officials said. The former head of Death Row Records was pulled over about 12:30 a.m. near Beverly Hills, said LAPD officer Drake Madison. He declined to say what the alleged traffic violation was. A records check showed Knight was wanted on a misdemeanor warrant and police took him into custody. He was booked into county jail and released before 4 a.m. on $20,000 bail, records show.
SPORTS
August 15, 2013 | By Diane Pucin
Quirky Frenchwoman Marion Bartoli, whose constant mimicking of her serve between points would often annoy opponents and who unexpectedly won Wimbledon in July, suddenly announced her retirement from the game Wednesday night after a loss at the Western & Southern Open in Cincinnati. Bartoli, 28, whose Wimbledon win in the final over Sabine Lisicki was her only major tournament victory, said in Cincinnati that her body was always sore. She gave an emotional and teary press conference and said, "I can no longer deal with the pain.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 2013 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Marion Dougherty came to New York from Pennsylvania in 1944 with dreams of becoming a theater set designer. While waiting for her big break, she worked for $45 a week designing windows at Bergdorf Goodman. But Dougherty's break came in a different form a few years later when a friend working at the NBC live anthology series "Kraft Television Theater" asked her to become a casting assistant on the show. In time, Dougherty would transform - and in many ways invent - the role of casting director that made her a legend in New York and Hollywood.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2013 | By Gary Goldstein
Casting directors, the largely unsung heroes of the film and TV business, enjoy a warm, deserving close-up in the highly watchable documentary "Casting By," in theaters for a quick run before its HBO premiere next month. Directed by Tom Donahue, the movie, jampacked with evocative film clips, archival footage and interviews with a who's who of actors and filmmakers (Clint Eastwood, Robert Redford, Woody Allen, Glenn Close, Al Pacino, Martin Scorsese and Bette Midler are but a few)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2008 | Joe Mozingo, Times Staff Writer
The 88-year-old man sits on a bench and lights a cracked briar pipe. He looks out at the black void and sighs. The firestorm three months ago killed most of the sound here. No birds warble, no leaves flutter, no coyotes yelp in the night. The giant, tilted slabs of granite on the ridge peer like statues down on a moldering pyre. Jerome "Joe" Wier comes up here most days in his little Chevy pickup and secondhand clothes.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 1997 | DARYL H. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tsk, tsk, Alan Ayckbourn scolds--isn't it shameful the way people behave toward one another? Especially men toward women? The English playwright has always taken a dim view of such behavior. Yet by ever-so-slightly exaggerating his point, he's able to get us laughing and perhaps even resolving to do better ourselves. In a remarkable outpouring of plays, including "The Norman Conquests" and "A Chorus of Disapproval," Ayckbourn has proved himself an acute observer of humankind.
SPORTS
July 7, 2013 | By Dan Loumena
Marion Bartoli, a French tennis veteran with the IQ of a genius and recently crowned Wimbledon women's champion, had little to say in the wake of a sexist remark about her looks by way of comparison to Maria Sharapova, a lanky blond from Russia. BBC radio commentator John Inverdale remarked after Bartoli's 6-1, 6-4 victory over Germany's Sabine Lisicki, "Do you think Bartoli's dad told her when she was little: 'You're never going to be a looker. You'll never be a Sharapova, so you have to be scrappy and fight'?"
SPORTS
July 6, 2013 | By Helene Elliott
WIMBLEDON, England — It's something of a cliche to discuss the obstacles that athletes have overcome to reach the pinnacle of their respective sports. Yet, if not for encountering difficulty along the way they might not have developed the determination that pushes them on the field, ice or tennis court, and both women who will play in Saturday's Wimbledon final have endured some difficult times. For Marion Bartoli, the No. 15-seeded woman, adversity was a falling out with her father, Walter, who was also her coach.
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