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Marital Status

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OPINION
February 23, 1992
If we must have a President who has never cheated on his wife, let's forget the men and elect a woman! MYRA BARKER Bakersfield
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 22, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Marriage may have an effect on weight -- so can divorce, a study finds. Researchers examined weight loss and gain in men and women in the two years following a marital transition, getting married or getting divorced. They found that there was a difference for the sexes: Men were at higher risk for gaining weight after divorce, while women were at higher risk of packing on the pounds following marriage. These weight gains were more likely to happen after age 30 -- before then, weight gains between just marrieds and unmarrieds weren't that dissimilar.
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REAL ESTATE
June 6, 1993 | Special to the Times
QUESTION: My significant other and I have been looking for a new place to live. We are a committed same-sex couple, and I'm surprised how accepting most of the prospective landlords we've talked to have been. Our search continues because we just haven't found the right type of setting for us yet. One strange thing did occur recently, and I would like an answer about the legal correctness of a question on a rental application.
NEWS
September 23, 2010
Doctors and scientists are still learning about what effects in vitro fertilization may have on the health of children. But a new study of children's test scores provides evidence that IVF conception "does not have any detrimental effects on a child's intelligence or cognitive development," the author says. Researchers looked at the academic test scores of 423 Iowa children ages 8 to 17 who were conceived by IVF and at the test scores of 372 matched peers from the same schools. They also analyzed data on the parents of the IVF children, including ethnicity, education, age and marital status.
NEWS
September 17, 1996 | From Associated Press
A bill requiring counties to record the marital status of new mothers was signed by Gov. Pete Wilson on Monday, ending California's practice of assuming a mother is unmarried if she doesn't use her husband's last name. "At a time when political rhetoric has targeted unwed mothers as contributing to the drain on public resources, it is critical that marital status data be accurate," said Assemblywoman Jackie Speier (D-Burlingame), author of the law. The law takes effect Jan. 1, 1997.
BUSINESS
July 28, 1993 | DONNA K. H. WALTERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A state Insurance Department task force is urging California Insurance Commissioner John A. Garamendi to get tough with insurers who discriminate--in rates and coverage--against unmarried individuals and "domestic partners." Garamendi already has embraced many of the recommendations of the group's report, which he will officially accept at a press conference in Los Angeles today. He is calling it a "vital blueprint to end unjustified discrimination against the unmarried."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1993 | DAVID E. BRADY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Last week, a task force for the California Department of Insurance issued a report urging state regulators to eliminate insurer discrimination against unmarried heterosexual and homosexual couples. Noting that by the year 2000 unmarried individuals will comprise a majority of the state's population, the study recommended the passage of state regulations declaring marital status-based rate bias to be an unfair business practice.
REAL ESTATE
November 16, 2003 | H. May Spitz, Special to The Times
Can a landlord turn down an otherwise qualified couple because they can't produce a wedding license? That depends on where they were applying for housing. Rejecting applicants on the basis of marital status is legal in many parts of the country but is illegal in some cities and states. In California, for example, marital status, familial status or age, among other things, cannot be the basis for applicant rejection.
BUSINESS
November 2, 1997
Q: I was laid off after my employer lost a major account. I was the first person to be hired to work on this account, am in good standing with my employer and have been told I will be rehired at the first opportunity. However, I am upset because two men who were hired long after I was have been retained to work on other accounts. I was told off the record by one of the managers that because I am married and my husband makes a good salary, management decided to lay me off and keep the two men.
NEWS
December 19, 2002
A classic column ("Yes, Virginia, You Must Believe," Dec. 12). And you're single why? Or maybe you're not and that's just your marital status de plume. Bob Colleary Sherman Oaks
SPORTS
November 4, 2009 | Bill Shaikin
The war of words continued to rage Tuesday in the Dodgers' divorce battle, with attorneys for both sides stating their cases in court papers filed in advance of Thursday's initial court hearing. Jamie McCourt, who claims co-ownership of the Dodgers, has asked the court for immediate reinstatement as chief executive officer of the team. Her attorneys argued such an order would maintain "the marital status quo, at least until the issue of ownership of the franchise has been finally determined."
REAL ESTATE
November 16, 2003 | H. May Spitz, Special to The Times
Can a landlord turn down an otherwise qualified couple because they can't produce a wedding license? That depends on where they were applying for housing. Rejecting applicants on the basis of marital status is legal in many parts of the country but is illegal in some cities and states. In California, for example, marital status, familial status or age, among other things, cannot be the basis for applicant rejection.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 2003
It was with great interest that I read the article "Marriage in the Third Degree" (Feb. 9). In describing the casual and cavalier attitude taken by society today toward second marriages, and really not being too terribly concerned about several thereafter, I was struck by the inequity toward a community that is not allowed to get married at all. My husband and I happily shared in the joyful experience of the marriages this year of our two daughters....
NEWS
December 19, 2002
A classic column ("Yes, Virginia, You Must Believe," Dec. 12). And you're single why? Or maybe you're not and that's just your marital status de plume. Bob Colleary Sherman Oaks
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 2000 | RUSSELL KOROBKIN, Russell Korobkin is a professor of law at UCLA
Congressional Republicans claim that the income tax system is unfair because it penalizes married couples. President Clinton claims that congressional efforts to eliminate the marriage penalty would give a windfall to married couples who are not now penalized. Who is right? Both are, and there is a solution that addresses both problems. Two features of the tax code create the puzzle. First, our progressive tax system taxes income at increasing marginal rates.
BUSINESS
November 2, 1997
Q: I was laid off after my employer lost a major account. I was the first person to be hired to work on this account, am in good standing with my employer and have been told I will be rehired at the first opportunity. However, I am upset because two men who were hired long after I was have been retained to work on other accounts. I was told off the record by one of the managers that because I am married and my husband makes a good salary, management decided to lay me off and keep the two men.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1996
Ye gads. Women who retained their maiden names following marriage knew they were repudiating centuries of tradition by not adopting their husband's last name--and sometimes offending in-laws in the process. Now, due to a silly statistical quirk in California, it seems they've also condemned their children to statistical purgatory and social obloquy as the products of "unwed mothers." California is one of five states that does not include marital status on birth certificates.
NEWS
October 22, 1991 | HELAINE OLEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
States are moving to outlaw marital rape, the act of sexually assaulting one's spouse. During the 1991 legislative session, four more states--South Carolina, Missouri, New Mexico and Utah--enacted laws making spousal rape a crime. That leaves only two--North Carolina and Oklahoma--with laws that enable a defendant to use the fact that he is married to the victim as an absolute defense against the charge of rape.
NEWS
September 17, 1996 | From Associated Press
A bill requiring counties to record the marital status of new mothers was signed by Gov. Pete Wilson on Monday, ending California's practice of assuming a mother is unmarried if she doesn't use her husband's last name. "At a time when political rhetoric has targeted unwed mothers as contributing to the drain on public resources, it is critical that marital status data be accurate," said Assemblywoman Jackie Speier (D-Burlingame), author of the law. The law takes effect Jan. 1, 1997.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1996
Ye gads. Women who retained their maiden names following marriage knew they were repudiating centuries of tradition by not adopting their husband's last name--and sometimes offending in-laws in the process. Now, due to a silly statistical quirk in California, it seems they've also condemned their children to statistical purgatory and social obloquy as the products of "unwed mothers." California is one of five states that does not include marital status on birth certificates.
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