Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsMaritime Industry
IN THE NEWS

Maritime Industry

FEATURED ARTICLES
OPINION
December 24, 2005
Re "Toward cleaner ports," editorial, Dec. 18 You mischaracterized the maritime industry's reaction to the appointment of Geraldine Knatz as new head of the Port of Los Angeles, as well as its continuing support for balanced and effective environmental programs. Our organization praised the appointment of Knatz, who is committed to improving air quality while ensuring Southern California remains a center of international trade. Ocean carriers are using and testing various technologies to lower emissions; marine terminals are making enormous investments in environment-friendly cargo-handling equipment; and terminals are working collaboratively to keep the ports open at nights and on weekends.
ARTICLES BY DATE
TRAVEL
February 26, 2012 | By Karl Zimmermann, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In the cab of Alberni Pacific Railway's No. 7, a small, tough logging locomotive that has spent its 82 years on Vancouver Island, Canada, George Williamson - at 78, nearly as old as the engine - notched out the throttle. In the fireman's seat was his son, Pat, not a young man himself. Nor was I, returning to a locomotive cab in which I'd ridden in 1969, when I'd wangled a ride out of the forest when this locomotive was hauling logs. Now it was toting tourists, and my cab ride was available for a modest extra fare.
Advertisement
NEWS
October 17, 1991 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The rocky harbor at one end of this tiny community is showing signs of life. Men walk their children carefully over the stone jetty, fishing rods and plastic buckets slung over their shoulders. The only reminders of its recent history are the cut ends of rusted barbed wire lying uselessly in the sand, where for more than 40 years they kept the residents from setting their boats in the sea.
BUSINESS
November 17, 2009 | Ronald D. White
Exports were up at the Port of Los Angeles in October for the first time this year, as Chinese consumers led a drive to buy U.S. products and factories stocked up on raw materials. The improvement over October 2008 is the first sign from the troubled Southern California port complex that global economic conditions may be starting to recover. At the Port of Long Beach, exports were down, but not nearly as much as they have been for most of the year. Imports were down at both ports, though the decline was not as steep as in prior months.
BUSINESS
September 27, 2009 | Ronald D. White
Her gig: Founder and chief executive of International Trade Education Programs Inc. of Glendale, a 10-year-old nonprofit that educates high school students about the maritime industry and encourages them to seek careers in trade, transportation, logistics and related professions. Her methods: Rowen, 74, has used her connections from eight years as a harbor commissioner at the Port of Los Angeles to bring high-level executives into the classrooms of Banning High School in Wilmington to teach and share their work experiences.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1999
An international transportation union will hold an open house this weekend aboard the Global Mariner, a cargo ship that has been modified to carry graphic displays of poor working conditions in the maritime industry. The ship, which is docked at Berth 53 in the Port of Los Angeles, belongs to the International Transport Workers' Federation, a London-based organization that represents more than 500 unions around the world.
BUSINESS
May 15, 1993 | DON PHILLIPS, WASHINGTON POST
The Clinton Administration has decided to allow all operating subsidies to commercial ship companies to expire as scheduled in 1997, likely spelling an end to America's small ocean-going merchant fleet and more than 20,000 maritime jobs, possibly including some based in California. The two major remaining U.S.
BUSINESS
September 16, 2009 | Ronald D. White
After a lonely three-week voyage across the Pacific, the multinational crew of the British-flagged container ship Hyundai Tokyo arrives at the largest U.S. port complex and proceeds to do irreparable damage to the stereotype of the hard-living international merchant seaman. The 28 sailors are as well-mannered as young men meeting their girlfriends' parents. The favored drink is Gatorade. The big snack: Blue Bunny Caramel Chocolate Nut ice cream cones. The most popular purchase is from Victoria's Secret -- not the catalog for those long nights at sea, but Amber Romance body spray or Love Spell, which they mail to wives back home.
BUSINESS
December 11, 1990 | HARRY BERNSTEIN
You may never have heard of a tiny, southwest Pacific island group called Vanuatu that was once known as New Hebrides and became an independent nation in 1980, with a population of just 115,000. But then you probably don't own a shipping company either. If you did, you would know that Vanuatu has joined Liberia, Panama, the Bahamas and a few other countries that for years have been selling "flags of convenience," which, along with drastic cuts in U.S.
BUSINESS
May 28, 1994 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five key U.S. maritime unions formally agreed Friday to support lifting a federal ban on the export of Alaskan crude oil in a deal worked out with British Petroleum Co. Breaking its silence, BP confirmed that it has agreed to preserve union jobs by using U.S.-flag tankers to ship any BP oil "that moves off the Alaskan North Slope," said Rob Rehg, a spokesman for the London-based oil company.
BUSINESS
September 27, 2009 | Ronald D. White
Her gig: Founder and chief executive of International Trade Education Programs Inc. of Glendale, a 10-year-old nonprofit that educates high school students about the maritime industry and encourages them to seek careers in trade, transportation, logistics and related professions. Her methods: Rowen, 74, has used her connections from eight years as a harbor commissioner at the Port of Los Angeles to bring high-level executives into the classrooms of Banning High School in Wilmington to teach and share their work experiences.
BUSINESS
September 16, 2009 | Ronald D. White
After a lonely three-week voyage across the Pacific, the multinational crew of the British-flagged container ship Hyundai Tokyo arrives at the largest U.S. port complex and proceeds to do irreparable damage to the stereotype of the hard-living international merchant seaman. The 28 sailors are as well-mannered as young men meeting their girlfriends' parents. The favored drink is Gatorade. The big snack: Blue Bunny Caramel Chocolate Nut ice cream cones. The most popular purchase is from Victoria's Secret -- not the catalog for those long nights at sea, but Amber Romance body spray or Love Spell, which they mail to wives back home.
OPINION
December 24, 2005
Re "Toward cleaner ports," editorial, Dec. 18 You mischaracterized the maritime industry's reaction to the appointment of Geraldine Knatz as new head of the Port of Los Angeles, as well as its continuing support for balanced and effective environmental programs. Our organization praised the appointment of Knatz, who is committed to improving air quality while ensuring Southern California remains a center of international trade. Ocean carriers are using and testing various technologies to lower emissions; marine terminals are making enormous investments in environment-friendly cargo-handling equipment; and terminals are working collaboratively to keep the ports open at nights and on weekends.
BUSINESS
December 10, 2005 | Ronald D. White, Times Staff Writer
On the high seas, there is no Wal-Mart or Costco to turn to when the need arises for 100 rolls of toilet paper, 100 pounds of pork heads or a few spare rockets. That's why there is Harbor Ship Supply Group. The San Pedro company, known as a "chandler" on the docks, is part supermarket, hardware dealer, department store and delivery service for items needed on a long voyage.
NATIONAL
September 15, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
The president of a national union of merchant fleet officers, his brother and two other people were indicted on federal charges of election-rigging, embezzlement and fraud, prosecutors in Miami said. The 13-count indictment names Michael McKay, 58, national president of the American Maritime Officers Union, and Robert McKay, 55, the union's national secretary-treasurer. Union employee James Lynch, 55, and former employee Phillip Ciccarelli, 64, also were charged.
NATIONAL
July 2, 2003 | Susannah Rosenblatt, Times Staff Writer
WASHINGTON -- Thousands of ships and port facilities across the country will tighten security against potential terrorist attacks under regulations issued Tuesday by the Department of Homeland Security. The regulations, which will become final later this year, require that more than 5,000 port facilities and 10,000 vessels assess their potential vulnerability and develop plans to plug security holes, including establishing baggage, cargo and passenger screening similar to that at airports.
BUSINESS
December 10, 2005 | Ronald D. White, Times Staff Writer
On the high seas, there is no Wal-Mart or Costco to turn to when the need arises for 100 rolls of toilet paper, 100 pounds of pork heads or a few spare rockets. That's why there is Harbor Ship Supply Group. The San Pedro company, known as a "chandler" on the docks, is part supermarket, hardware dealer, department store and delivery service for items needed on a long voyage.
NATIONAL
July 2, 2003 | Susannah Rosenblatt, Times Staff Writer
WASHINGTON -- Thousands of ships and port facilities across the country will tighten security against potential terrorist attacks under regulations issued Tuesday by the Department of Homeland Security. The regulations, which will become final later this year, require that more than 5,000 port facilities and 10,000 vessels assess their potential vulnerability and develop plans to plug security holes, including establishing baggage, cargo and passenger screening similar to that at airports.
NEWS
March 7, 2000 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite the fear of oil spills, coastal states generally may not set extra safety rules for huge oil tankers operating in their waters, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday. The 9-0 ruling upholds the principle of "national uniformity regarding maritime commerce," so that ships can move from port to port, both here and abroad, under one set of rules. Congress and the Coast Guard are responsible for setting safety standards, the court said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1999
An international transportation union will hold an open house this weekend aboard the Global Mariner, a cargo ship that has been modified to carry graphic displays of poor working conditions in the maritime industry. The ship, which is docked at Berth 53 in the Port of Los Angeles, belongs to the International Transport Workers' Federation, a London-based organization that represents more than 500 unions around the world.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|