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Marjorie Knoller

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MAGAZINE
June 2, 2002 | STEVE BERRY
At 3 a.m. on Feb. 8, 2001, Marjorie Knoller and her husband, Robert Noel, got out of bed so they'd be on time for their scheduled appearance on "Good Morning America." They wanted to correct what they considered the "grotesque and negative" image they'd developed in the media since Jan. 26, when their large Presa Canario dogs, Bane and Hera, got away from Knoller in the hallway of their San Francisco apartment building and one of them mauled neighbor Diane Whipple to death.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 2008 | Maria L. La Ganga
An attorney whose dogs mauled her neighbor to death in an attack that received national attention was sentenced Monday to 15 years to life in prison for the 2001 murder of lacrosse coach Dianne Whipple. Marjorie Knoller was originally sentenced to four years in prison on a lesser charge of involuntary manslaughter after a judge threw out the jury's second-degree murder conviction in 2002. Superior Court Judge James Warren said at the time that there was not enough evidence that Knoller knew her two Presa Canarios -- each weighing about 100 pounds -- would kill.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A woman convicted along with her husband of involuntary manslaughter in the dog-mauling death of a San Francisco neighbor has been paroled to Ventura County. Corrections officials declined to say what city Marjorie Knoller had gone to, but the only parole office in the county is in Oxnard. Knoller, 48, and her husband, Robert Noel, 62, each served about 16 months in prison for their March 2002 convictions in the death of Diane Whipple, 33.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 2008 | From the Associated Press
A woman whose dog mauled her neighbor to death could return to prison for several years after a Superior Court judge Friday reinstated the jury's original second- degree murder conviction. "The defendant acted with conscious disregard for human life," Judge Charlotte Woolard said after listing some of more than 30 incidents in which Marjorie Knoller's dogs bit or lunged at other people, and quoting from a veterinarian's letter warning the dogs were dangerous. Woolard then reinstated the jury's conviction of second- degree murder for Knoller in connection to the death of Dianne Whipple in 2001.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 2001
A couple accused in the dog-mauling death of a San Francisco woman have asked a judge to move the trial out of the city. Lawyers for Robert Noel and Marjorie Knoller told Superior Court Judge James Warren on Monday it would be impossible to get a fair hearing in San Francisco because of the "general tabloid coverage" and "political overtones" of the case. Prosecutors said they will not contest the change-of-venue motion. A hearing was set for Sept. 14.
OPINION
June 21, 2002
Re "Mauling Murder Count Voided," June 18: All of us who have served on juries are offended by Judge James Warren's ruling--after the jury deliberated--that a second-degree murder conviction of Marjorie Knoller in the atrocious killing of an innocent woman by viciously trained dogs was inappropriate. The judge could have eliminated second-degree murder as a possibility before the jury deliberated. But he did not. He let the jurors waste their time, which the judge obviously values at zero.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 2002
Re 'Killer Dogs' Owners Ignored Danger Warnings, Jury Told,' Feb. 20: What's surprising to me is not that Marjorie Knoller and Robert Noel had almost 30 prior warnings and incidents with regard to their dogs; the surprising thing is that after the first two or three warnings they were allowed to continue staying in that apartment building. The apartment owner and manager should be put on trial too. When is Sacramento going to get it? Certain breeds of dangerous dogs need to be outlawed in California.
NEWS
March 10, 2001 | From Associated Press
A grand jury heard its first witnesses Friday in a hearing to consider whether to indict two lawyers whose dogs fatally mauled a woman in late January in the hallway of her San Francisco apartment building. The 19-member panel heard evidence against Marjorie Knoller and Robert Noel, who were caring for the dogs involved in the Jan. 26 attack on college lacrosse coach Diane Whipple.
NEWS
March 13, 2001 | From Associated Press
The partner of a woman who was fatally mauled by two dogs in January filed a wrongful-death suit Monday against the two lawyers who were caretakers for the animals. After filing the suit in San Francisco Superior Court, Sharon Smith and her attorneys said that in addition to requiring Robert Noel and Marjorie Knoller to accept responsibility for Diane Whipple's death, they also hope to clear a legal hurdle: that of having California recognize Smith and Whipple as a couple.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 2008 | From the Associated Press
A woman whose dog mauled her neighbor to death could return to prison for several years after a Superior Court judge Friday reinstated the jury's original second- degree murder conviction. "The defendant acted with conscious disregard for human life," Judge Charlotte Woolard said after listing some of more than 30 incidents in which Marjorie Knoller's dogs bit or lunged at other people, and quoting from a veterinarian's letter warning the dogs were dangerous. Woolard then reinstated the jury's conviction of second- degree murder for Knoller in connection to the death of Dianne Whipple in 2001.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 2007 | Maura Dolan, Times Staff Writer
The California Supreme Court unanimously decided Thursday that a judge must reconsider whether Marjorie Knoller, who served time for a fatal dog mauling, should have a more serious murder conviction reinstated and be returned to prison. The state high court said the trial judge who threw out the jury's second-degree murder conviction of Knoller interpreted the murder statute too narrowly.
OPINION
April 21, 2007
Re "Can a dog mauling be murder?" April 16 Marjorie Knoller belongs in prison for life given her total, flagrant disregard for the safety of others. A veterinarian alerted her that her dogs were a menace; a dog bit a fellow tenant in the lobby; a dog lunged, teeth bared, at the abdomen of a pregnant woman; a dog had bitten victim Diane Whipple the month before. How many more red flags did Knoller require? All this and Knoller lived in an apartment building -- in everyday proximity to other people.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Julie Lee, a top political fundraiser for former California Secretary of State Kevin Shelley, was indicted Thursday on charges of diverting $125,000 from a taxpayer-funded grant to Shelley's campaign coffers. An FBI investigation led a federal grand jury to issue the indictment that charges Lee with four counts of mail fraud and three counts of attempted witness tampering, said U.S. Atty. McGregor Scott. Last month, Lee pleaded not guilty to related criminal charges in San Francisco.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 2005 | Caitlin Liu, Times Staff Writer
In a ruling that could send a defendant in a grisly dog-mauling case back to prison, a state appellate panel Thursday ordered a judge to reconsider throwing out the jury's murder verdict. Three years ago, San Francisco Superior Court Judge James Warren outraged victim advocates and prosecutors when he vacated the second-degree murder conviction of Marjorie Knoller, who owned the two dogs that attacked and killed neighbor Diane Whipple on Jan. 26, 2001.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A woman convicted along with her husband of involuntary manslaughter in the dog-mauling death of a San Francisco neighbor has been paroled to Ventura County. Corrections officials declined to say what city Marjorie Knoller had gone to, but the only parole office in the county is in Oxnard. Knoller, 48, and her husband, Robert Noel, 62, each served about 16 months in prison for their March 2002 convictions in the death of Diane Whipple, 33.
OPINION
June 21, 2002
Re "Mauling Murder Count Voided," June 18: All of us who have served on juries are offended by Judge James Warren's ruling--after the jury deliberated--that a second-degree murder conviction of Marjorie Knoller in the atrocious killing of an innocent woman by viciously trained dogs was inappropriate. The judge could have eliminated second-degree murder as a possibility before the jury deliberated. But he did not. He let the jurors waste their time, which the judge obviously values at zero.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 2008 | Maria L. La Ganga
An attorney whose dogs mauled her neighbor to death in an attack that received national attention was sentenced Monday to 15 years to life in prison for the 2001 murder of lacrosse coach Dianne Whipple. Marjorie Knoller was originally sentenced to four years in prison on a lesser charge of involuntary manslaughter after a judge threw out the jury's second-degree murder conviction in 2002. Superior Court Judge James Warren said at the time that there was not enough evidence that Knoller knew her two Presa Canarios -- each weighing about 100 pounds -- would kill.
NEWS
February 22, 2001 | From Associated Press
The keepers of two dogs involved in the fatal mauling of a San Francisco woman conspired with prison inmates to breed dogs "trained to fight, attack or kill," prosecutors said Wednesday. Prosecutor James Hammer announced the allegations against Robert Noel and his wife, Marjorie Knoller, as he urged a judge not to throw out evidence that police had seized from the couple's apartment. The couple's two dogs attacked and killed 33-year-old Diane Whipple on Jan.
MAGAZINE
June 2, 2002 | STEVE BERRY
At 3 a.m. on Feb. 8, 2001, Marjorie Knoller and her husband, Robert Noel, got out of bed so they'd be on time for their scheduled appearance on "Good Morning America." They wanted to correct what they considered the "grotesque and negative" image they'd developed in the media since Jan. 26, when their large Presa Canario dogs, Bane and Hera, got away from Knoller in the hallway of their San Francisco apartment building and one of them mauled neighbor Diane Whipple to death.
OPINION
March 30, 2002
I have to put in my two cents' worth about the March 25 letters on the dog-mauling case. I have had Doberman pinschers for the last 20 years since I was attacked in my own home. Having to certify someone who wants to own an aggressive breed of dog won't work. The answer lies with how the dog has been socialized. I have never trained any of my dogs to be aggressive. They have only received obedience training. Those Presa Canarios were not socialized properly. They were also trained to kill for the sake of high wagers for pit fighting.
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