Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsMark Bringelson
IN THE NEWS

Mark Bringelson

MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 1988 | JANICE ARKATOV
Nikola who? "He's one of those well-kept secrets," said Mark Bringelson, speaking of Croatian-born electrical inventor Nikola Tesla (1856-1943). Tesla is the subject of Donald Krieger's new multimedia theater piece, "The Tesla Project," which opens Wednesday at LACE. "I'd never heard of him. But when Donald started explaining who he was--and about his neurotic tendencies, I immediately became interested." How neurotic? "Unbelievably. Exceedingly," Bringelson said sunnily.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 1988 | JANICE ARKATOV
Nikola who? "He's one of those well-kept secrets," said Mark Bringelson, speaking of Croatian-born electrical inventor Nikola Tesla (1856-1943). Tesla is the subject of Donald Krieger's new multimedia theater piece, "The Tesla Project," which opens Wednesday at LACE. "I'd never heard of him. But when Donald started explaining who he was--and about his neurotic tendencies, I immediately became interested." How neurotic? "Unbelievably. Exceedingly," Bringelson said sunnily.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 1996 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY
"Cyberqueer" at the Celebration Theatre is an often dazzling, sometimes frustrating debut for first-time playwright Jake Specchio, whose great promise occasionally falls through the cracks of his own inexperience. A high-tech comedy, "Cyberqueer" is primarily set in cyberspace--a gay and lesbian computer chat room, to be exact. In this sexually charged fantasy world, everyone is beautiful, no one ages, and AIDS has been reduced to a distant murmur.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1999 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY
Everyone gets a chance to chomp the scenery in "Who's Afraid of Edward Albee?" Michael Kearns' original drama at Glaxa professes to examine the gay subtexts in "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" However, somewhere along its careening route, the play veers, intentionally or not, into parody. Whatever Kearns' dramatic intent, this sprawling exercise in excess is consistently fascinating, as watchable as a train wreck and as feverishly histrionic as a Joan Crawford film festival.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1998 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY
The return engagement of "Cyberqueer" at the Celebration is frothier and far funnier than the original 1996 production. When lovelorn linguistics professor Nelson (Brian Quinn) decides to go online looking for action, he winds up in a gay and lesbian chat room presided over by the formidable Wicca (flamboyantly campy Jennifer Taub), a latter-day goddess who rules the ether of cyberspace with all the finesse of a New Age Nazi.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1993 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"It's slippery sliding down the Blue Corridor," says a Mimi Seton lyric in her new musical-theater piece at Playwrights' Arena. Conceived and directed by Mark Bringelson, with words and music by Seton, "Blue Corridor" leads to doorways behind which live very ordinary people with extraordinary outlooks on life. That's the stock in trade of Bringelson and Seton, who were among the collaborators on the memorable "Brain Hotel" and "Wazo Wazo" in the '80s.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 1999 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY
Larry Fineberg's postmillennial drama "The Clairvoyant" at Playwrights' Arena attempts to fuse futuristic techno-paranoia and the lush, familiar strains of melodrama, with largely disastrous results. Imagine a sci-fi "Now Voyager" and you'll get the idea. The action is set in a "large coastal city" in the year 2038. The world economy has collapsed, climatological changes have ravaged the environment, and the oceans have been reduced to carcinogenic cesspools.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2005 | David C. Nichols, Special to The Times
In "Bunbury," playwright Tom Jacobson fashions a character for Oscar Wilde's unseen plot device from "The Importance of Being Earnest" and sends him into giddy collision with various coevals from classic plays. Merely that aspect of this ingenious fantasia -- "A serious play for trivial people" -- will seduce theater buffs. Bathed in designer Henry Sume's moony lighting, Bunbury (Sean Wing) begins as lily-wielding Wildean pastiche. Trading epigrams with valet Hartley (Scot M.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 1998 | JANA J. MONJI
Worn red bricks, wire mesh, the dust of indifference and the grit of common cruelty are the foundations of a London housing project in the powerful "The Neighbour" at 24th Street Theatre. The Tuesday Laboratory's presentation of Meredith Oakes' drama has a hard-edged elegance as it explores the horrors of unneighborly neighbors. "When someone finds fault with me, it interrupts my inner life," James (Miles Eastman) opines--and his inner life is constantly interrupted.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 1985 | KIRK ELLIS
It's only a matter of time before John O'Keefe finds the wide audience he deserves. Amid the general sitcomland of current local theater, the work of this Bay Area performance artist, marked by an uncommon regard for language and an unsparing yet ultimately compassionate view of the human condition, offers an adult alternative. If his followers can be said to constitute a cult, it is most certainly that of literacy.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2008 | David C. Nichols
"Pretty ... is only pretty. . . . There are a million ways to make a nice physical impression." So begins "Ken Roht's 99-Cent Only Calendar Girl Competition" at the Bootleg Theater. Even longtime fans are unprepared for what follows. Irreverent musical theater visionary Roht achieves absolute synthesis with this marvelous gloss on beauty pageants and the politics of image. Conceived and created during the presidential election, "Competition" takes the price-conscious aesthetic elements on a runway strut to another realm altogether.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|