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December 3, 1991 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mark C. Bloome, who immigrated to Southern California from Canada in 1924 and parlayed a 15-cent-a-gallon Richfield gasoline station into one of the nation's largest chain of tire stores, is dead. His son-in-law, Jerry Fields, who helped oversee the 45 tire and service stations in the chain until they were sold in 1972, said Bloome was 89 when he died Sunday at his Beverly Hills home. As with many of Southern California's aged entrepreneurs, Bloome had his origins elsewhere.
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BUSINESS
May 27, 2011 | David Lazarus
You can't knock Mark Bloome for his good intentions. The Seattle philanthropist is head of a nonprofit organization called TAP America, which says it wants to strengthen the country by having consumers buy more American-made products. And he's no stranger to the business world. If Bloome's name sounds familiar, that's because he's the son of Mark C. Bloome, who built a Los Angeles service station into one of the biggest chains of tire stores in the country. His "buy America" campaign isn't a bad thing per se. Good intentions aside, though, the knock on Bloome is that buying American can be a challenge.
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BUSINESS
May 27, 2011 | David Lazarus
You can't knock Mark Bloome for his good intentions. The Seattle philanthropist is head of a nonprofit organization called TAP America, which says it wants to strengthen the country by having consumers buy more American-made products. And he's no stranger to the business world. If Bloome's name sounds familiar, that's because he's the son of Mark C. Bloome, who built a Los Angeles service station into one of the biggest chains of tire stores in the country. His "buy America" campaign isn't a bad thing per se. Good intentions aside, though, the knock on Bloome is that buying American can be a challenge.
NEWS
December 3, 1991 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mark C. Bloome, who immigrated to Southern California from Canada in 1924 and parlayed a 15-cent-a-gallon Richfield gasoline station into one of the nation's largest chain of tire stores, is dead. His son-in-law, Jerry Fields, who helped oversee the 45 tire and service stations in the chain until they were sold in 1972, said Bloome was 89 when he died Sunday at his Beverly Hills home. As with many of Southern California's aged entrepreneurs, Bloome had his origins elsewhere.
NEWS
April 16, 1986
Tire magnate Mark C. Bloome, 83, was charged by the Los Angeles city attorney's office with hit-run driving with injury, disobeying a police officer and driving over traffic cones and flares in connection with a Century City incident last month when his car allegedly struck a traffic officer. Bloome was headed for Hillcrest Country Club on March 16 when he reportedly ignored commands of officers and drove through a roadblock set up for marchers in a pro-choice abortion rally.
NEWS
March 6, 1986
El Monte has begun acquiring properties to clear the way for a $9-million railroad underpass beneath Peck Road just north of the San Bernardino Freeway. The City Council last week agreed to pay $234,000 for an auto transmission repair shop at 3467 Peck Road. Public Works Director Bob Pinniger said the city already has purchased a Mark C. Bloome tire store and will buy another seven properties within the next 120 days.
NEWS
March 29, 1986
The Los Angeles district attorney's office has recommended that the state Department of Motor Vehicles consider revoking the driver's license of retired tire magnate Mark C. Bloome as a result of a recent traffic incident in Century City. Bloome, 83, is accused of disobeying a Los Angeles Police Department officer who was diverting cars during a pro-abortion march sponsored by the National Organization for Women through the streets of Century City on March 16.
NEWS
September 26, 1985 | AL MARTINEZ
Nipper's, which is a club in Beverly Hills where the rich and famous go to dance and drink champagne, was opened to the press last week for a party to introduce a new mineral water from France. As you might imagine, Nipper's is not a place normally frequented by journalists, whose tastes run more to bars that serve gin and peanuts rather than Dom Perignon and foie de canard. But it was free, so many of us dropped by.
BUSINESS
July 4, 1985 | JAMES RISEN, Times Staff Writer
A flood of imported tires entering the United States is swamping the nation's huge replacement tire market, eroding the profits of domestic producers, tire industry officials warned Wednesday. Goodyear Tire & Rubber, the nation's largest tire producer, said its second-quarter earnings are likely to be down 25% from last year, mainly because its "private brand" tire sales are suffering from increased competition from imports. In last year's second quarter, Goodyear earned $108.
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