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Mark Dippe

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MAGAZINE
May 12, 1996
I read with interest "Hollywood's Millennium People" (By Patrick Goldstein, March 24). Mark Dippe's statement: "When I go to an art museum, I feel like I'm in the hallowed halls of dead men. When art gets codified and deified, it loses its edge." That is how he says he feels. Sounds like a thought to me, but OK. I wonder if, after Dippe is dead, any of his art will have the effect of, say, Michelangelo's "David" or even his unfinished work, "The Apostles." The first time I was in the presence of these two works of art, I had to take to my bed, because the "edge" was too much for a mere mortal being.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 1997 | Times Staff Writers and Contributors
This week ABC begins running a major on-air ad campaign--set against a bright yellow backdrop--designed to make Americans feel good about watching television. The "TV Is Good" theme features one commercial that links American prosperity to high TV viewing levels as well as slogans such as "It's a Beautiful Day. What Are You Doing Outside?" and "The Couch Is Your Friend."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 1995 | Connie Benesch, Connie Benesch is a frequent contributor to Calendar. and
B eep-Beep! All of a sudden it's rush hour on the animation super highway. With theatrical shorts starring Mickey Mouse, Bugs Bunny and Daffy Duck already in theaters, and cartoons featuring everyone from Woody Woodpecker to Michigan J. Frog in the works, animated short subjects are back in favor with studios to a degree not seen perhaps since the animation heyday of the 1950s.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1997 | STEVEN SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
You don't have to watch the skies or surf the Internet. It's official: The aliens are landing this month. And in June, July and August. This summer, studios are boldly going where their competition is going: into deep space, as a record number of big-budget science-fiction films vie for mainstream crowds and repeat-viewing fans. The battle began last week, with director Luc Besson's $90-million futuristic fantasy "The Fifth Element," starring Bruce Willis.
BUSINESS
August 6, 1997 | MARLA MATZER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Special effects have become standard in movies, and not just for "special effects movies" like "The Lost World" and "Men in Black." Nowadays, visual tricks are used to create scenes in most mid- to high-budget studio films. The upshot is that special effects are getting both more and less expensive. At the high end, each "shot" of five to seven seconds can easily cost an average of $100,000 from a top special-effects house such as George Lucas' Industrial Light & Magic.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 1997 | Cheo Hodari Coker, Cheo Hodari Coker is a Times staff writer
Pointing a long, spindly finger at his right temple, Todd McFarlane stands on the sidelines of Hollywood Center Studios Stage 7. "This is what I've been living with upstairs in my head, yep," he says. The creator and publisher of "Spawn," one of the nation's hottest comic book, marvels at the live representation of a world he created in 1992 with a few idle minutes and splotches of ink.
MAGAZINE
March 24, 1996 | Patrick Goldstein, Patrick Goldstein's last story for the magazine was about Elia Kazan and the Hollywood blacklist
Just 10 years ago, to find the center of gravity in Hollywood, you would have gone to Chasen's, celebrated watering hole for the industry elite, where you might have found MCA titan Lew Wasserman at a prized corner table, boasting about the fans lined up outside the studio's King Kong theme-park attraction. A decade later, the Hollywood landscape has been transformed.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 1996
(More or fewer than five nominations in a category are as a result of ties.) General Categories Record of the Year: "One Sweet Day," Mariah Carey and Boyz II Men (Walter Afanasieff and Carey, producers); "Gangsta's Paradise," Coolio (Doug Rasheed, producer); "One of Us," Joan Osborne (Rick Chertoff, producer); "Kiss From a Rose," Seal (Trevor Horn, producer); "Waterfalls," TLC (Organized Noize, producer).
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