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WORLD
January 24, 2012 | By Henry Chu and Paul Richter, Los Angeles Times
Europe slapped a boycott on Iranian oil Monday, signaling that the Islamic Republic's second-largest market is likely to dry up as part of a U.S.-led sanctions campaign that has already inflicted serious damage on Iran's economy and sharply increased tensions. The value of Iran's currency is falling dramatically, prices are rising and Iranians are stocking up on supplies in fear of worse to come. Iran, which receives an estimated 70% of its revenue from oil sales, has threatened to retaliate by choking off the flow of oil through the Strait of Hormuz at the southern end of the Persian Gulf.
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WORLD
July 31, 2013 | By Paul Richter
WASHINGTON - The House voted 400-20 Wednesday to hit Iran with the toughest sanctions yet over its nuclear program, in a forceful rejection of arguments that Congress should refrain from new penalties pending international negotiations with the new Iranian government. The lawmakers adopted a bill that would basically block Iran from selling any oil abroad, after a year in which its exports have already been cut in half by international sanctions. Lawmakers said they wanted to send Tehran a strong signal before the negotiations, and didn't believe statements by Iran's president-elect, Hassan Rouhani, that he wants a better relationship with the West.
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WORLD
March 14, 2012 | By Paul Richter and Alex Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
  China'slargest bank has backed out of a deal to finance a proposed Iran-to-Pakistan gas pipeline that is opposed by the United States, a potential sign of the lengthening reach of U.S. economic sanctions on Iran. Pakistani officials confirmed Wednesday that Industrial and Commercial Bank of China had withdrawn from plans to head a consortium that would finance the $1.6-billion Pakistani portion of the cross-border pipeline, apparently over concern that the bank could be excluded from the U.S. economy.
WORLD
March 14, 2012 | By Paul Richter and Alex Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
  China'slargest bank has backed out of a deal to finance a proposed Iran-to-Pakistan gas pipeline that is opposed by the United States, a potential sign of the lengthening reach of U.S. economic sanctions on Iran. Pakistani officials confirmed Wednesday that Industrial and Commercial Bank of China had withdrawn from plans to head a consortium that would finance the $1.6-billion Pakistani portion of the cross-border pipeline, apparently over concern that the bank could be excluded from the U.S. economy.
NEWS
November 21, 2011 | By Christi Parsons and Paul Richter, Washington Bureau
The Obama administration will designate Iran and its central bank as a "primary money-laundering concern" Monday and impose new sanctions aimed at deterring the regime from developing nuclear weapons. The Treasury Department is not planning to sanction Bank Markazi, Iran's central bank, despite calls from some Republicans and Democrats in Congress to do so. But U.S. officials hope the new set of sanctions will inspire other governments to break off transactions with both the central bank and with businesses in Iran, especially those in its critical energy sector.
WORLD
September 30, 2010 | By Paul Richter, Los Angeles Times
The Obama administration rolled out its first penalty Thursday under the new U.S. sanctions on Iran, but carefully avoided any challenge to Russian and Chinese companies that would have risked diplomatic fallout. The administration sanctioned a Swiss subsidiary of Iran's national oil company, while declaring that it was weighing punishments against other, unidentified foreign companies. The 4-month-old sanctions are aimed at drying up foreign investment in Iran's oil and gas sector in hopes of persuading Tehran to agree to limits on its disputed nuclear program.
WORLD
July 31, 2013 | By Paul Richter
WASHINGTON - The House voted 400-20 Wednesday to hit Iran with the toughest sanctions yet over its nuclear program, in a forceful rejection of arguments that Congress should refrain from new penalties pending international negotiations with the new Iranian government. The lawmakers adopted a bill that would basically block Iran from selling any oil abroad, after a year in which its exports have already been cut in half by international sanctions. Lawmakers said they wanted to send Tehran a strong signal before the negotiations, and didn't believe statements by Iran's president-elect, Hassan Rouhani, that he wants a better relationship with the West.
WORLD
November 22, 2011 | By Paul Richter, Los Angeles Times
The Obama administration slapped Iran with a new round of sanctions for its alleged nuclear and terrorist activities, but stopped short of the tough economic punishments favored by many in Congress. In an announcement coordinated with Britain and Canada, U.S. officials said they were imposing new punishments aimed at Iran's petrochemical sector and organizations involved in the country's nuclear program or terrorism, such as the Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps and its elite Quds Force.
WORLD
February 17, 2012 | By Paul Richter, Los Angeles Times
Despite the Obama administration's vows to cripple Iran with economic sanctions, it is leaders in Congress and Europe who have seized the lead in the West's long-running campaign to punish Tehran for its suspected nuclear weapons program. In recent months, the toughest moves to deter Iran from pursuing its presumed nuclear ambitions have come from a bipartisan group in Congress and European allies, especially Britain and France. The White House at first resisted these steps before embracing them as inevitable.
WORLD
September 15, 2011 | By Paul Richter and Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
The European Union, which buys 90% of Syria's oil exports, has slapped sanctions on the nation's oil and gas industry, but loopholes allow European energy companies to pull back only gradually from buying heavy crude or doing lucrative work in Syrian oil fields. Syria's other key trading partners, including Turkey, Iraq, Jordan and Lebanon, have maintained economic ties with Damascus even as Syrian troops and tanks have killed thousands of people since a popular uprising began in March.
WORLD
February 17, 2012 | By Paul Richter, Los Angeles Times
Despite the Obama administration's vows to cripple Iran with economic sanctions, it is leaders in Congress and Europe who have seized the lead in the West's long-running campaign to punish Tehran for its suspected nuclear weapons program. In recent months, the toughest moves to deter Iran from pursuing its presumed nuclear ambitions have come from a bipartisan group in Congress and European allies, especially Britain and France. The White House at first resisted these steps before embracing them as inevitable.
WORLD
January 24, 2012 | By Henry Chu and Paul Richter, Los Angeles Times
Europe slapped a boycott on Iranian oil Monday, signaling that the Islamic Republic's second-largest market is likely to dry up as part of a U.S.-led sanctions campaign that has already inflicted serious damage on Iran's economy and sharply increased tensions. The value of Iran's currency is falling dramatically, prices are rising and Iranians are stocking up on supplies in fear of worse to come. Iran, which receives an estimated 70% of its revenue from oil sales, has threatened to retaliate by choking off the flow of oil through the Strait of Hormuz at the southern end of the Persian Gulf.
WORLD
November 22, 2011 | By Paul Richter, Los Angeles Times
The Obama administration slapped Iran with a new round of sanctions for its alleged nuclear and terrorist activities, but stopped short of the tough economic punishments favored by many in Congress. In an announcement coordinated with Britain and Canada, U.S. officials said they were imposing new punishments aimed at Iran's petrochemical sector and organizations involved in the country's nuclear program or terrorism, such as the Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps and its elite Quds Force.
NEWS
November 21, 2011 | By Christi Parsons and Paul Richter, Washington Bureau
The Obama administration will designate Iran and its central bank as a "primary money-laundering concern" Monday and impose new sanctions aimed at deterring the regime from developing nuclear weapons. The Treasury Department is not planning to sanction Bank Markazi, Iran's central bank, despite calls from some Republicans and Democrats in Congress to do so. But U.S. officials hope the new set of sanctions will inspire other governments to break off transactions with both the central bank and with businesses in Iran, especially those in its critical energy sector.
WORLD
September 30, 2010 | By Paul Richter, Los Angeles Times
The Obama administration rolled out its first penalty Thursday under the new U.S. sanctions on Iran, but carefully avoided any challenge to Russian and Chinese companies that would have risked diplomatic fallout. The administration sanctioned a Swiss subsidiary of Iran's national oil company, while declaring that it was weighing punishments against other, unidentified foreign companies. The 4-month-old sanctions are aimed at drying up foreign investment in Iran's oil and gas sector in hopes of persuading Tehran to agree to limits on its disputed nuclear program.
WORLD
June 11, 2010 | By Paul Richter, Los Angeles Times
The Obama administration, which labored for months to impose tough new United Nations sanctions against Iran, now is pushing in the opposite direction against Congress as it crafts U.S. sanctions that the White House fears may go too far. Administration officials have begun negotiations with congressional leaders, who are working on versions of House and Senate bills that would punish companies that sell refined petroleum products to Iran or...
WORLD
August 8, 2010 | By Paul Richter, Los Angeles Times
Efforts by the United States and its European allies to build a united front to halt Iran's nuclear program are facing increasingly bold resistance from China, Russia, India and Turkey, which are rushing to boost their economies by seizing investment opportunities in defiance of sanctions imposed by the West. The Obama administration and the European Union opted to try to toughen United Nations sanctions against Iran with their own unilateral restrictions on foreign companies that do business with Tehran's energy sector, hoping that squeezing the country's most lucrative industry can force the Islamist government to bend on its nuclear program.
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