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Mark Mcgwire

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October 10, 2013 | By Bill Shaikin
ST. LOUIS - Mark McGwire is family here. No one saw that coming, not at the beginning. The St. Louis Cardinals rented him for the pennant stretch in 1997, and surely the California kid would serve out his two months, then go home in free agency. He stayed, for the rest of his career. He electrified the city, home run after home run after record-breaking home run. In 2001, when he could no longer play, he walked away from the Cardinals, and from the $30 million they had guaranteed him. In 2010, when he admitted he had used steroids, St. Louis gave him a big hug and welcomed him back to the Cardinals, this time as the hitting coach.
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SPORTS
November 7, 2012 | Bill Plaschke
When you think of Mark McGwire, you think of numbers, but not those numbers. You don't think of 583 career homers, or 70 homers in 1998, or one homer in every 10.61 at-bats. You think, instead, of 19.5. That is the percentage of baseball Hall of Fame votes he received last winter. He received 19.5% when 75% is required for entry. His name will appear for nine more years on the regular ballot, but it could be there 90 years, he still has zero chance of ever entering Cooperstown, a notion that is important now that he's entering Chavez Ravine.
SPORTS
August 24, 1998 | SHAV GLICK
The Pittsburgh Pirates tried giving away golf umbrellas and beach towels, but nothing helped in selling out Three Rivers Stadium. Then Mark McGwire and the St. Louis Cardinals came to town. The Saturday and Sunday games were the first consecutive regular-season sellouts at Three Rivers Stadium. "The Mark McGwire home run craze is quite phenomenal," said Vic Gregovits, the Pirates' vice president of marketing and broadcasting. Crowds of 38,149 showed up for beach towels and 41,568 for umbrellas.
SPORTS
January 12, 2010 | By Mike DiGiovanna
A recluse no more, Mark McGwire finally talked about the past, admitting what virtually everyone in baseball suspected for years, that he used steroids during his 16-year career, including the memorable 1998 season in which he and Sammy Sosa revitalized the game with their Great Home Run Chase. What Congress couldn't coax out of McGwire under oath in 2005, an impending return to baseball as the St. Louis Cardinals' hitting coach -- and the questions that would no doubt dog him in his return to the public eye -- could.
SPORTS
September 5, 1988
At 6-feet 2-inches and 190 pounds, Neil Allen of the New York Yankees is not small, but Mark McGwire of the Oakland A's is 6-5, 225. After Allen beaned McGwire Saturday, the Oakland first baseman charged the mound. Said Allen afterward: "I was just trying to figure out where I was going when his body got there." And what was he thinking? "No mas," Allen said.
SPORTS
November 4, 1987 | Associated Press
Oakland Athletics first baseman Mark McGwire, whose 49 home runs set a major league record for a first-year player, was unanimously selected Rookie of the Year in the American League, the Baseball Writers Assn. of America announced Tuesday. McGwire, the choice of all 28 voters, is the second unanimous selection in the 40-year history of the award. Carlton Fisk of the Boston Red Sox was the first, in 1972.
SPORTS
November 8, 2012 | By Steve Dilbeck
It's the return of Web links … Normally I prefer to disagree with The Times' Bill Plaschke. Spent half my professional career arguing with him, because where's the fun in just simply sharing the same point of view? But I thought he was right on in his column on the Dodgers' hiring Mark McGwire as their new hitting coach. It's one thing to not honor him by an admission into the Hall of Fame because of his steroid use, which McGwire seems to understand, and something else to deny him employment.
SPORTS
April 12, 2010
Barry Bonds said he is "proud" of slugger Mark McGwire for returning to baseball as the St. Louis Cardinals' hitting coach and for admitting his use of performance-enhancing drugs. "I have a really good friendship with Mark McGwire. I'm proud of him," Bonds said Sunday in San Francisco at a reunion of the Giants' 2000 National League West champion team. "We've had a great relationship throughout our entire lives and throughout our career. I'm proud of what he did. I'm happy for him."
SPORTS
September 28, 1998
PLATE APPEARANCES Sammy Sosa Sacrifice flys: 0.7% Hit by pitch: 0.1% Intentional walks: 1.9% Grounded into double plays: 2.6% Doubles: 2.8% Home Runs: 9.2% Walks: 10.2% Singles: 15.3% Fly Outs: 18.9% Ground Outs: 19.1% Strikeouts: 23.7% * Mark McGwire Sacrifice flys: 0.6% Hit by pitch: 0.9% Grounded into double plays: 1.2% Doubles: 3.1% Intentional walks: 4.1% Singles: 9.0% Ground Outs: 10.1% Home Runs: 10.3% Fly Outs: 19.5% Strikeouts: 22.8% Walks: 23.
SPORTS
September 10, 1998 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just beyond the cracked left-field wall where Sammy Sosa hit his earliest home runs, in a tattered batting cage behind fading stars that read "Alou," "Marichal" and "Mota," Roberto Corporan was chasing the dream that drives so many in this storied Dominican town. Sweating rivers in the blazing sun this week, Corporan and his scout were the lone figures in Alfredo Raynold Stadium, the muddy and rutted field of dreams where the Chicago Cub slugger--like so many others before him--first played baseball.
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