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Mark Russell

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NEWS
October 27, 1991 | Sharon Bernstein
Mark Russell has been doing his own blend of music and political satire on public television for 15 years. His series, which runs every other month, kicks off the 1992 presidential election campaign Wednesday with lampoons of would-be Democratic and Republican candidates, including President Bush.
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NEWS
January 12, 2012 | By Chris Erskine, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
The Alaska National Guard has sent 60 troops, mostly to wield shovels, to the tiny fishing town of Cordova, which has been socked by 15 feet of snow, and with more on the way. The storm has already caused avalanches along Seward Highway, cutting off Anchorage from neighborhoods to the south and the ski area of Girdwood . . . . After six years, Las Vegas' version of "The Phantom of the Opera" is winding down. Show officials said this week that the last performance at the Venetian Hotel will be Sept.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 1989 | DUNCAN STRAUSS
Veteran comedian Mark Russell, who has made regular pilgrimages the last few years to UC Irvine, returns to the campus for a performance tonight at the Bren Events Center. Some longtime Russell observers consider him a modern-day Will Rogers, although Russell performs with a piano instead of a lariat and, as a veteran political satirist, he has met a few men he didn't like. But when Russell uses his droll one-liners and bouncy tunes to skewer these men (and women) he doesn't like, he never confines them, like many political comics, to just Republican figures.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2001 | STEVEN LINAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An evening dominated by reruns is broken up by the latest "Mark Russell Comedy Special" (9:30 p.m. KCET; 8 p.m. KVCR). Believe it or not, this bespectacled, bow-tied humorist has been poking fun at politicians for 26 years. Do the math. That means he's been zinging Democrats and Republicans alike since Gerald Ford was in the White House. Improv wizard Wayne Brady ("Whose Line Is It Anyway?"
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 1988 | JOHN VOLAND, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Not all the print and broadcast pilgrims to New Orleans--the GOP estimates between 12,000 and 15,000 will materialize next week--will be journalists. Some will be there for laughs. For instance, Fox Broadcasting's syndicated "A Current Affair" program is sending master Reagan impressionist Jim Morris, who was also in Atlanta last month twitting the Democrats. Mark Russell, one of Washington's favorite professional wags, also was in Atlanta, but on ABC's "Good Morning, America."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 1987 | DUNCAN STRAUSS
Piano-playing political satirist Mark Russell returns to UC Irvine Thursday armed--so to speak--with jokes and humorous songs about the Iranamuck controversy and other capital follies that have occurred since his last performance here in December, 1985. When the bespectacled comedian takes the stage at the university's Bren Events Center, odds are good that he'll sing "My Teflon Lies Over the Ocean," one of his many musical parodies penned in the wake of the Iran- contras affair.
NEWS
January 12, 2012 | By Chris Erskine, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
The Alaska National Guard has sent 60 troops, mostly to wield shovels, to the tiny fishing town of Cordova, which has been socked by 15 feet of snow, and with more on the way. The storm has already caused avalanches along Seward Highway, cutting off Anchorage from neighborhoods to the south and the ski area of Girdwood . . . . After six years, Las Vegas' version of "The Phantom of the Opera" is winding down. Show officials said this week that the last performance at the Venetian Hotel will be Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1991 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Veteran political humorist Mark Russell is no stranger to Irvine, where he'll hold forth at his trademark grand piano Sunday afternoon at UCI. "The last time I was in Irvine," says Russell, "was at a fund-raiser for Alan Cranston; it was held under a table." Actually, Russell's performance at the Bren Events Center will mark his fourth visit to UCI.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 1988 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON, Times Staff Writer
It's amazing to see a performer so fresh come out of an environment that has become so stale. Mark Russell, who played a one-nighter at Caltech in Pasadena on Friday, has worked virtually his entire career as a Washington insider. Unlike most other comedians who, when they make a lame pass towards a political joke, almost desperately lean on shared prejudices with their audience, Russell knows the people he jokes about.
NEWS
October 27, 1991 | Sharon Bernstein
Mark Russell has been doing his own blend of music and political satire on public television for 15 years. His series, which runs every other month, kicks off the 1992 presidential election campaign Wednesday with lampoons of would-be Democratic and Republican candidates, including President Bush.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1991 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Veteran political humorist Mark Russell is no stranger to Irvine, where he'll hold forth at his trademark grand piano Sunday afternoon at UCI. "The last time I was in Irvine," says Russell, "was at a fund-raiser for Alan Cranston; it was held under a table." Actually, Russell's performance at the Bren Events Center will mark his fourth visit to UCI.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 1989 | DUNCAN STRAUSS
Veteran comedian Mark Russell, who has made regular pilgrimages the last few years to UC Irvine, returns to the campus for a performance tonight at the Bren Events Center. Some longtime Russell observers consider him a modern-day Will Rogers, although Russell performs with a piano instead of a lariat and, as a veteran political satirist, he has met a few men he didn't like. But when Russell uses his droll one-liners and bouncy tunes to skewer these men (and women) he doesn't like, he never confines them, like many political comics, to just Republican figures.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 1988 | JOHN VOLAND, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Not all the print and broadcast pilgrims to New Orleans--the GOP estimates between 12,000 and 15,000 will materialize next week--will be journalists. Some will be there for laughs. For instance, Fox Broadcasting's syndicated "A Current Affair" program is sending master Reagan impressionist Jim Morris, who was also in Atlanta last month twitting the Democrats. Mark Russell, one of Washington's favorite professional wags, also was in Atlanta, but on ABC's "Good Morning, America."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 1988
Lawrence Christon is probably one of the more apt appraisers of comedy, but in his article on Mark Russell I wondered if he liked Mark Russell for his wit, or his political bias ("Russell Knows the Lighter Side of Washington," Feb. 22). Russell made a stab at writing for TV, but if his words don't have a musical score behind them they lose something. However, while he was here he picked up--by osmosis--some of the Hollywood pseudopolitical chitchat, and where he used to show flashes of wit he now shows dismal vehemence.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 1986 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON
There's an innate democracy about scandal. It's bad for a few, but sport for the many. Throughout the Watergate era, Mark Russell was licking his chops. So much was revealed and discussed daily that Russell was able to perform two completely different shows nightly at Washington's Shoreham Hotel, where he held forth as comedian-with-portfolio for 20 years, beginning in 1961.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 1988
Lawrence Christon is probably one of the more apt appraisers of comedy, but in his article on Mark Russell I wondered if he liked Mark Russell for his wit, or his political bias ("Russell Knows the Lighter Side of Washington," Feb. 22). Russell made a stab at writing for TV, but if his words don't have a musical score behind them they lose something. However, while he was here he picked up--by osmosis--some of the Hollywood pseudopolitical chitchat, and where he used to show flashes of wit he now shows dismal vehemence.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 1988 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON, Times Staff Writer
It's amazing to see a performer so fresh come out of an environment that has become so stale. Mark Russell, who played a one-nighter at Caltech in Pasadena on Friday, has worked virtually his entire career as a Washington insider. Unlike most other comedians who, when they make a lame pass towards a political joke, almost desperately lean on shared prejudices with their audience, Russell knows the people he jokes about.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 1987 | DUNCAN STRAUSS
Piano-playing political satirist Mark Russell returns to UC Irvine Thursday armed--so to speak--with jokes and humorous songs about the Iranamuck controversy and other capital follies that have occurred since his last performance here in December, 1985. When the bespectacled comedian takes the stage at the university's Bren Events Center, odds are good that he'll sing "My Teflon Lies Over the Ocean," one of his many musical parodies penned in the wake of the Iran- contras affair.
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