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Mark Shipper

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1991 | DAVID FERRELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If he were sleepwalking, Mark Shipper could easily stumble into the Pacific Ocean. But at 1:07 in the morning, his fax machine is whirring and his apartment is as Manhattan as Fifth Avenue. The TV is tuned to a New York news channel. The wall clock is set three hours ahead--to Eastern Daylight Time. The fax is bringing in New York's top morning news stories. All the while, Shipper's specially modified telephone is playing a New York radio station over a speaker phone.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1991 | DAVID FERRELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If he were sleepwalking, Mark Shipper could easily stumble into the Pacific Ocean. But at 1:07 in the morning, his fax machine is whirring and his apartment is as Manhattan as Fifth Avenue. The TV is tuned to a New York news channel. The wall clock is set three hours ahead--to Eastern Daylight Time. The fax is bringing in New York's top morning news stories. All the while, Shipper's specially modified telephone is playing a New York radio station over a speaker phone.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1987 | Charles Solomon
We passed on Dial-a-Hunk, Dial-a-Nerd and the various "party" lines, but Outtakes couldn't resist calling the 976-number that supposedly lists "jobs in the entertainment industry." (Westside telephone poles are plastered with advertisements for it.) The recorded message offered us a choice of "entertainment industry jobs," "unlisted apartments on the Westside" and male or female roles in film, modeling or TV.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1998 | STEVE HARVEY
Mark Shipper notes that the publication Radio & Records says that at one of Madonna's former estates in L.A., this sign was posted: "Madonna No Longer Lives Here. Dogs Attack at the Command Word 'Madonna.' " This reminded real estate agent Barry Peele of a notice displayed at the onetime residence of another actress who was well known as an animal lover. Peele recalled that it said "something to the effect, 'Please don't leave any stray animals at the door. Doris Day doesn't live here anymore.'
NEWS
March 20, 1998 | BOB POOL and CARLA HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
On Thursday, Dodger blue was the color of the mood, as fans waxed wistful about the end of a tradition. Of course, the concerns of business and sports long ago merged, the power brokers of each seeing an opportunity to fuel the other's interests. But, somehow, the taint of business seemed to elude the Dodgers. Fans reveled in the knowledge that the team--at least as a corporate entity--had remained serenely unchanged, owned by the same family for almost 50 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 1990 | CLAUDIA PUIG, Claudia Puig is a Times staff writer.
It's a typical weekday morning and you're driving to work, distractedly switching from one radio station to the next. First stop: KQLZ-FM, hard-driving "Pirate Radio" (100.3). A commercial seems to be playing. You're about to turn to another station but something sounds a bit strange. . . . A man with an ordinary voice is saying: "So, it's 3 in the morning, the phone rings. It's some guy from MCI tellin' me how AT&T charges too much for long-distance, and how he can save me all kinds of money.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 1991 | DAVID WHARTON, David Wharton is a Times staff writer who writes about entertainment for the Westside and San Fernando Valley editions. and
His stand-up comedy routine is not so much jokes as it is a guided tour of modern American youth delivered as a free-form monologue in surf-rap slang. His style is boyish and hip, his persona a 21-year-old half-brained kid in single-minded pursuit of parties, girls and gnarly guitar solos. "Stoney," he tells his fans. "You're chillin' major with the Weasel." Ten years ago, Pauly Shore's act would have had nowhere to go. Adult audiences in comedy clubs can barely decipher what he's saying, let alone appreciate it. But today there is a sizable younger audience of college and high-school students and even smaller kids--the "crusty little dudes" as he calls them--who have embraced Shore and "their" comedian.
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