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NATIONAL
February 3, 2010 | Chicago Tribune
Rep. Mark Steven Kirk gained the right to try to wrest President Obama's old Senate seat out of Democratic hands Tuesday night, easily winning the GOP primary and the right to face state Treasurer Alexi Giannoulias, who narrowly won the Democratic nomination. The governor's race was too close to call. The incumbent, Pat Quinn, held a slim lead on the Democratic side, while three Republicans each had about 20% of the vote in the GOP primary. But the Senate race has drawn the most national attention, especially after Democrats lost their filibuster-proof majority last month when Republican Scott Brown won the late Sen. Edward M. Kennedy's seat in Massachusetts.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1998 | MEGAN GARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a town littered with dropouts who end up making it big, the story of high school teacher and screenwriter Mark Stevens has a natural hook. Stevens, a 36-year-old English and drama teacher, never got a high school diploma. What's more, he teaches at John F. Kennedy High School, where he was kicked out as a student nearly 20 years ago. Now, he has a screenplay being made into a film. And life today, Stevens says, seems a little like an after-school special.
BOOKS
November 14, 2004 | Hilton Kramer, Hilton Kramer is editor of the New Criterion, author of such books as "The Age of the Avant-Garde" and "The Twilight of the Intellectuals" and longtime art critic for the New York Observer.
In the life and work of the Abstract Expressionist painter Willem de Kooning (1904-97), the good news comes early in this massive biography by Mark Stevens and Annalyn Swan. From the outset, this handsome, abundantly talented Dutch immigrant was the golden boy of New York's avant-garde art scene, a painter from whom everything was expected and to whom nothing would be denied.
NEWS
February 17, 1990 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Keith Haring, whose distinctive, cartoon-like drawings in subway stations caught the attention of art dealers who made him famous miles away from those dank underground tunnels, died Friday of AIDS. He was 31. Haring, who was diagnosed as having AIDS more than a year ago and was active in AIDS fund-raising, fell ill with flu-like symptoms in January and died early Friday at his Manhattan home.
BOOKS
November 14, 2004 | Hilton Kramer, Hilton Kramer is editor of the New Criterion, author of such books as "The Age of the Avant-Garde" and "The Twilight of the Intellectuals" and longtime art critic for the New York Observer.
In the life and work of the Abstract Expressionist painter Willem de Kooning (1904-97), the good news comes early in this massive biography by Mark Stevens and Annalyn Swan. From the outset, this handsome, abundantly talented Dutch immigrant was the golden boy of New York's avant-garde art scene, a painter from whom everything was expected and to whom nothing would be denied.
NATIONAL
February 3, 2010 | Chicago Tribune
Rep. Mark Steven Kirk gained the right to try to wrest President Obama's old Senate seat out of Democratic hands Tuesday night, easily winning the GOP primary and the right to face state Treasurer Alexi Giannoulias, who narrowly won the Democratic nomination. The governor's race was too close to call. The incumbent, Pat Quinn, held a slim lead on the Democratic side, while three Republicans each had about 20% of the vote in the GOP primary. But the Senate race has drawn the most national attention, especially after Democrats lost their filibuster-proof majority last month when Republican Scott Brown won the late Sen. Edward M. Kennedy's seat in Massachusetts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 2004 | From Times Staff Reports
USC has received a gift of $22 million from Silicon Valley venture capitalist Mark A. Stevens, a USC alumnus, and his wife, Mary. The donation, for a new institute in the university's Virbili School of Engineering, will be used to encourage research and help translate discoveries and developments in the lab to the marketplace. Mark Stevens, 44, is a general partner at Sequoia Capital, a leading venture capital firm based in Menlo Park.
BUSINESS
July 14, 1985
Mark L. Stevens has been appointed president and general manager the ice cream maker Haagen-Dazs Co., Englewood Cliffs., N.J., a subsidiary of Pillsbury Co. He also becomes a vice president of Pillsbury.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 2001
Jazz and pop vocalist Joanie Sommers will mark the CD reissues of her four Warner Bros. albums of the 1960s by resuming her career with an engagement at the Hollywood Roosevelt Cinegrill Aug. 14-18. She will be accompanied nightly at 8 p.m. by a jazz trio led by pianist Ed Vodicka, with Jim Hughart on bass and Mark Stevens on drums. Sommers' show will be recorded live for a new album. The Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel is at 7000 Hollywood Blvd. For more information, call (323) 466-7000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1998 | MEGAN GARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a town littered with dropouts who end up making it big, the story of high school teacher and screenwriter Mark Stevens has a natural hook. Stevens, a 36-year-old English and drama teacher, never got a high school diploma. What's more, he teaches at John F. Kennedy High School, where he was kicked out as a student nearly 20 years ago. Now, he has a screenplay being made into a film. And life today, Stevens says, seems a little like an after-school special.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1996
Full moons may make some people crazy. But to a group of Westside residents, a full moon means a nocturnal workout. The outdoorsy Brentwood residents hike in the Santa Monica Mountains on the evenings of full moons. Mark Stevens, who owns a fitness gym in Brentwood, says he has led groups of between five and 20 people on full-moon mountain hikes for the past eight years. "The full moon is so bright you don't even need a flashlight," Stevens said. "It's very mystical."
NATIONAL
March 19, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
"Gilead," Marilynne Robinson's poetic, modern-day testament of a dying Iowa preacher, has won the National Book Critics Circle prize for fiction. The biography/autobiography prize was given to "De Kooning: An American Master," by Mark Stevens and Annalyn Swan. Patrick Neate won in the criticism category for "Where You're At: Notes From the Frontline of a Hip-Hop Planet." Diarmaid MacCulloch's "The Reformation: A History" won for general nonfiction.
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