Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsMark W Travis
IN THE NEWS

Mark W Travis

MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 1988 | JANICE ARKATOV
Three months ago, 47-year-old Shane McCabe did a monologue for an acting class that knocked the socks off Mark W. Travis, his teacher. "It was about a young boy who was taken away from home and left in a motel for the entire summer," Travis said. "There was money allocated for food, but he was basically abandoned. At the end of the summer, his mother came and took him back home. And Shane said, 'I didn't understand till much later that she was trying to save my life.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 1988 | JANICE ARKATOV
Three months ago, 47-year-old Shane McCabe did a monologue for an acting class that knocked the socks off Mark W. Travis, his teacher. "It was about a young boy who was taken away from home and left in a motel for the entire summer," Travis said. "There was money allocated for food, but he was basically abandoned. At the end of the summer, his mother came and took him back home. And Shane said, 'I didn't understand till much later that she was trying to save my life.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1994 | RICHARD STAYTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There is one hypnotic performance in "Daughters." Unfortunately for everyone else involved with the Los Angeles premiere of John Morgan Evans' excessively loquacious soap opera at the Hudson Theatre, this star never utters a comprehensible word and is only seen briefly during Act I. Confused, self-absorbed, utterly peripheral to the plot, Connie Sawyer's Old World grandmother mirrors our confusion.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1999 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY
"Time Flies When You're Alive," Paul Linke's autobiographical solo show about the death of his wife, Francesca, in 1986, was first produced in 1987. As Linke notes during the show's present run at Pacific Resident Theatre, he has performed "Time Flies" roughly 300 times. Yet in Charles Nelson Reilly's staging, based on Mark W. Travis' original direction, Linke's wrenching reminiscence echoes with undiminished artistry and surprising humor.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 1992 | KAREN FRICKER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
At this point in the autobiographical solo performance game, you gotta have a gimmick. The field's pretty crowded, and it's the rare performer who has anything new to contribute. There's certainly no new ground broken in "Undressing New Jersey (and Other States of Mind)" written by spouses Wendy Kamenoff and Steve Mittleman and performed by Kamenoff at the Court Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 1992 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Art Metrano fell from a ladder in 1989 and suffered a "hangman's break"--the kind of injury that kills people on the gallows. But Metrano survived. Now the actor and comic has turned the story of his ordeal into a rambling one-man up-from-adversity tale, "Twice Blessed," at the Hollywood Playhouse. Metrano hired writer Cynthia Lee and director Mark W. Travis to help stage his story.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 1993 | RICHARD STAYTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Even paranoids have to laugh. That's the principle behind "Marooned in Malibu," a loony farce about Hollywood wanna-bes, at the Tiffany Theatre. Daniel Hopsicker's play poses a worst-case scenario for a troubled industry: A fire is out of control, the Santa Ana winds are raging, an earthquake is about to erupt, a tidal wave is offshore and the masses are burning the idle rich. "I've seen the future--it belongs to crowds," anxiously cries a horrified network executive.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 1989 | RAY LOYND
We're in the Bronx, in the '60s, watching life in an Italian neighborhood through the eyes of a 9-year-old boy. Signs on a lamppost tell us we're at 187th Street and Belmont Avenue. That detail is important. It underscores the almost feral sense of place and character in the autobiographical "A Bronx Tale."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 1992 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Women's Liberation and today's attempts by men to rediscover their masculinity (by bonding, running into the woods, beating drums and what-have-you) have done nothing to help the sexes get along with each other. It's all still guesswork for most guys, like Danny in Dayton Callie's "Survival of the Heart," at Theatre West. He's divorced and has been living with Kate for seven years. Now Kate has walked out on him, for the third time, and he's shattered.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 1986 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
"And a Nightingale Sang," at the Santa Monica Playhouse, is "You Can't Take It With You," with buzz bombs. A British family sticks together during World War Two II: Ma on her knees before the Blessed Mother, Da trying to figure out the chords for the latest American pop tune, Grandpa carrying on about nothing and the girls mooning about their love lives. This isn't pluck; it's self-absorption. Had C.P.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|