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Mark Watters

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1999
As an industry organization representing more than 600 of the premiere motion picture and television composers and lyricists, we are writing to express our frustration and dismay over The Times' exclusion of motion picture music in Calendar's special Oscar edition ("Aces in the Crowd," March 21). The composers, songwriters and lyricists who compose the musical scores or write the songs that so uniquely support the drama add immeasurably to the total viewing experience of these movies.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1999
As an industry organization representing more than 600 of the premiere motion picture and television composers and lyricists, we are writing to express our frustration and dismay over The Times' exclusion of motion picture music in Calendar's special Oscar edition ("Aces in the Crowd," March 21). The composers, songwriters and lyricists who compose the musical scores or write the songs that so uniquely support the drama add immeasurably to the total viewing experience of these movies.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 1994
Thanks for giving us the Claire Rydell Counterpunch, "Composers Milk a Dead-End Aesthetic" (May 2). I too have wished that "just once I would see a review of new music that expressed even slightly what I felt." Her comments may be as close as I will ever get. I scan the concert program to see if there is a "West Coast Premiere." If so, I rationalize that the orchestra must enjoy a chance to make something other than music, to play in the mud, as it were. I can't begrudge them that.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1996 | DAVID E. BRADY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The athletes who enter Olympic Stadium in Atlanta tonight behind the flag of their country will be realizing a lifelong dream. Mark Watters will be one of the non-athletes with the same kind of goose bumps. Watters, whose road to Atlanta began when he laid hands on his first guitar as a teenager, knows tonight will be the biggest night of his musical composing career.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1996 | DAVID E. BRADY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the 1996 Olympic Games begin tonight in Atlanta, an estimated 3.5 billion viewers around the world are expected to tune in for the spectacle of the opening ceremony. For many athletes who will enter Olympic Stadium behind the flag of their country, it will represent the realization of a lifelong dream to compete for the gold. For composer Mark Watters, it will simply be the biggest night of his career.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1992 | G. BRUCE SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Robert Aitchison pulls a large box from a drawer in a file cabinet, lifts the lid and reveals the contents: a hardly recognizable clump of crumpled and torn paper. His job--if the client gives him the go-ahead--will be to take that mess of paper and restore it so that it can be used in a court of law. The paper is the ship's log from an oil-drilling vessel that sank in the South China Sea and may be used as evidence in a lawsuit resulting from the disaster.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1996 | DAVID E. BRADY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The athletes who enter Olympic Stadium in Atlanta tonight behind the flag of their country will be realizing a lifelong dream. Mark Watters will be one of the non-athletes with the same kind of goose bumps. Watters, whose road to Atlanta began when he laid hands on his first guitar as a teenager, knows tonight will be the biggest night of his musical composing career.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 1990
Sharon Bernstein's Feb. 28 article "Some Discord in Philharmonic's String Section" is what I would expect to find in the National Enquirer, the Star or some other trashy tabloid. Not the Los Angeles Times. It reeked of gutter-level gossip and innuendo. Shame on the Liebermans for allowing their lawyer to go public with such a personal situation and double shame on Calendar for printing it. MARK WATTERS, Canoga Park Bernstein's article centered on a married couple's charge that they are being harassed by a woman with whom the husband was romantically involved when he was single.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 2002 | Randy Lewis
The Santa Cruz-based Nuclear Whales Saxophone Orchestra is spearheading an effort to assemble 1,000 sax players from around the world to perform atop the Great Wall of China next summer. Orchestra founder Don Stevens conceived the event, part of International Olympic Day activities in China on June 23, "to show the Great Wall as a symbol of peace that can bring people of all nations together through music."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 1991 | TIMOTHY MANGAN
It was as if the last 80 years of music history had never happened. So conservative were the pieces on the Winners Concert of the Pacific Composers Forum's Competition for New Music that they might have been written that long ago, and even then not caused a stir. Challenging their listeners would not seem to be among these composers' concerns. Pleasantness, accessibility, wistfulness would.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1996 | DAVID E. BRADY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the 1996 Olympic Games begin tonight in Atlanta, an estimated 3.5 billion viewers around the world are expected to tune in for the spectacle of the opening ceremony. For many athletes who will enter Olympic Stadium behind the flag of their country, it will represent the realization of a lifelong dream to compete for the gold. For composer Mark Watters, it will simply be the biggest night of his career.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 1994
Thanks for giving us the Claire Rydell Counterpunch, "Composers Milk a Dead-End Aesthetic" (May 2). I too have wished that "just once I would see a review of new music that expressed even slightly what I felt." Her comments may be as close as I will ever get. I scan the concert program to see if there is a "West Coast Premiere." If so, I rationalize that the orchestra must enjoy a chance to make something other than music, to play in the mud, as it were. I can't begrudge them that.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1992 | G. BRUCE SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Robert Aitchison pulls a large box from a drawer in a file cabinet, lifts the lid and reveals the contents: a hardly recognizable clump of crumpled and torn paper. His job--if the client gives him the go-ahead--will be to take that mess of paper and restore it so that it can be used in a court of law. The paper is the ship's log from an oil-drilling vessel that sank in the South China Sea and may be used as evidence in a lawsuit resulting from the disaster.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 1995 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"The Pebble and the Penguin" is pure enchantment, a beguiling animated fantasy of assured style, boasting some rousing new songs by Barry Manilow and Bruce Sussman and the aptly cast, highly expressive voice talents of Martin Short, James Belushi, Tim Curry and Annie Golden. Narrated by Shani Wallis, this charmer for all ages from veteran animator Don Bluth's company is all of a piece.
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