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Marla Gibbs

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 1990
Actress Marla Gibbs' Crossroads Arts Academy has purchased the Leimert theater complex in Leimert Park from the Jehovah's Witnesses for $3.2 million and will convert the site into a playhouse and concert hall, academy officials have announced. The complex, on 43rd Place near Leimert Boulevard, includes what will be an 800-seat main stage and an adjacent property with a 99-seat theater, classrooms, a restaurant and banquet hall.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 1997 | JOHN L. MITCHELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When actress Marla Gibbs purchased a vacant 1,000-seat theater in the Crenshaw district and named it the Vision Theater Complex, she was chasing a dream to build an entertainment center in the heart of the black community. It would be Los Angeles' version of Harlem's internationally known Apollo Theater, and more. That was back in 1990. And since then, from time to time, the theater lived up to its billing. Hillary Rodham Clinton came there to campaign.
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NEWS
October 24, 1988 | Marylouise Oates
Two wildly successful women, talk-show host Oprah Winfrey and actress Marla Gibbs--public personalities who happen to be black--were honored this past weekend. Barbara Walters, emceeing the National Conference of Christians and Jews Humanitarian Award Dinner on Saturday night, probably explained the significance best, first noting that it was the organization's 40th year: "I remember Adolf Hitler. I remember how Japanese citizens were treated in this state. I remember segregated schools . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 1994
"Another Evening of Jazz," featuring Charles Owens, will be presented at 8:30 p.m. Friday at Marla Gibbs' Vision Theatre, Los Angeles. Tax-deductible tickets are $20 in advance, $22 at the door or $50 for preferred seating and patron listing. Proceeds will benefit the Los Angeles Chapter of the Prairie View A&M University Scholarship program. For tickets or information, call (213) 755-3147 or (213) 291-1976.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 1990 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To borrow a phrase from "The Jeffersons," the TV sitcom that made Marla Gibbs a star, Gibbs' theater is "movin' on up." The Crossroads Arts Academy and Theatre has moved into a $3.2-million home in Leimert Park--and has begun a three- to five-year campaign to raise $10 million for the retirement of the debt, the renovation of the facility and the establishment of an endowment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1990 | EDWARD J. BOYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It began one day last summer with jazz drummer Al (Tootie) Heath's "devotional" rhythms from an African drum. A friend soon joined in, playing a bamboo flute. Once the impromptu sidewalk set was under way outside Brian Breye's Museum in Black on Degnan Boulevard, a passing drummer from Dakar, Senegal, parked his station wagon, set up his drums and joined in.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Rebroadcasts of the comedy series "227" will replace the game show "Win, Lose or Draw" on NBC's daytime schedule starting Sept. 4, the network announced Wednesday. Marla Gibbs heads the cast of "227," which revolves around the tenants of a Washington apartment. The series will be going into its fifth year in prime time come fall, airing Saturdays at 8 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 1997 | JOHN L. MITCHELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When actress Marla Gibbs purchased a vacant 1,000-seat theater in the Crenshaw district and named it the Vision Theater Complex, she was chasing a dream to build an entertainment center in the heart of the black community. It would be Los Angeles' version of Harlem's internationally known Apollo Theater, and more. That was back in 1990. And since then, from time to time, the theater lived up to its billing. Hillary Rodham Clinton came there to campaign.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 1991 | LEONARD FEATHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Marla Gibbs just doesn't appreciate herself. That was the problem with her show Friday night. Though she has changed the name of her room from Marla's Memory Lane to Marla's Jazz Supper Club, the truth is that even on Fridays and Saturdays, when jazz is indeed on hand, she presents it as if this were a Las Vegas lounge.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 1991 | ZAN STEWART
The blues seemed to be on everyone's mind Friday at Marla's jazz supper club as singer Barbara Morrison and her invited friends--tenor saxophonists Plas Johnson, Teddy Edwards and Rickey Woodard, along with blues belter Jimmy Witherspoon--injected a soulful, finger-popping feeling into whatever was played. The evening was the second of three consecutive nights billed as an "Inner City Jazz Party" at the Los Angeles establishment.
NEWS
August 15, 1993 | ERIN J. AUBRY
With the aplomb of a seasoned traffic cop, actress Marla Gibbs stands in the middle of the stage of her Vision Complex Theatre directing workers who are readying the facility for the opening of the Los Angeles Festival this week. She calls out instructions to a group of men who are perched on ladders and rigging lights. After quickly consulting one worker about setting stage marks, she heads to the lobby to check on the progress of another group busy installing granite flooring.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 1991 | ZAN STEWART
The blues seemed to be on everyone's mind Friday at Marla's jazz supper club as singer Barbara Morrison and her invited friends--tenor saxophonists Plas Johnson, Teddy Edwards and Rickey Woodard, along with blues belter Jimmy Witherspoon--injected a soulful, finger-popping feeling into whatever was played. The evening was the second of three consecutive nights billed as an "Inner City Jazz Party" at the Los Angeles establishment.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 1991 | LEONARD FEATHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Marla Gibbs just doesn't appreciate herself. That was the problem with her show Friday night. Though she has changed the name of her room from Marla's Memory Lane to Marla's Jazz Supper Club, the truth is that even on Fridays and Saturdays, when jazz is indeed on hand, she presents it as if this were a Las Vegas lounge.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 1990 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To borrow a phrase from "The Jeffersons," the TV sitcom that made Marla Gibbs a star, Gibbs' theater is "movin' on up." The Crossroads Arts Academy and Theatre has moved into a $3.2-million home in Leimert Park--and has begun a three- to five-year campaign to raise $10 million for the retirement of the debt, the renovation of the facility and the establishment of an endowment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 1990
Actress Marla Gibbs' Crossroads Arts Academy has purchased the Leimert theater complex in Leimert Park from the Jehovah's Witnesses for $3.2 million and will convert the site into a playhouse and concert hall, academy officials have announced. The complex, on 43rd Place near Leimert Boulevard, includes what will be an 800-seat main stage and an adjacent property with a 99-seat theater, classrooms, a restaurant and banquet hall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1990 | EDWARD J. BOYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It began one day last summer with jazz drummer Al (Tootie) Heath's "devotional" rhythms from an African drum. A friend soon joined in, playing a bamboo flute. Once the impromptu sidewalk set was under way outside Brian Breye's Museum in Black on Degnan Boulevard, a passing drummer from Dakar, Senegal, parked his station wagon, set up his drums and joined in.
NEWS
August 15, 1993 | ERIN J. AUBRY
With the aplomb of a seasoned traffic cop, actress Marla Gibbs stands in the middle of the stage of her Vision Complex Theatre directing workers who are readying the facility for the opening of the Los Angeles Festival this week. She calls out instructions to a group of men who are perched on ladders and rigging lights. After quickly consulting one worker about setting stage marks, she heads to the lobby to check on the progress of another group busy installing granite flooring.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1990 | SHARON BERNSTEIN
Steve Salas left his job as an extra on an episode of NBC's "227" about homelessness just in time to get some sleep--in the Cameo movie theater downtown. Don Beckemeyer, who like Salas played a homeless man on the program, couldn't afford such luxury. He'd used part of the $3 that the producers gave him for transportation that day to buy cigarettes, so he couldn't afford the theater's admission.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1990 | SHARON BERNSTEIN
Steve Salas left his job as an extra on an episode of NBC's "227" about homelessness just in time to get some sleep--in the Cameo movie theater downtown. Don Beckemeyer, who like Salas played a homeless man on the program, couldn't afford such luxury. He'd used part of the $3 that the producers gave him for transportation that day to buy cigarettes, so he couldn't afford the theater's admission.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Rebroadcasts of the comedy series "227" will replace the game show "Win, Lose or Draw" on NBC's daytime schedule starting Sept. 4, the network announced Wednesday. Marla Gibbs heads the cast of "227," which revolves around the tenants of a Washington apartment. The series will be going into its fifth year in prime time come fall, airing Saturdays at 8 p.m.
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