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Marlene Dietrich

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2014 | By Susan King
A 1955 letter to Marlene Dietrich from Ernest Hemingway, which begins with the author referring to the legendary actress as "Dearest Kraut," one of Dietrich's blue and black double breasted tuxedos, a late 19th-century Swiss cylinder music box, several of the star's powder compacts and even a Kermit the Frog watch are among the rare items from Dietrich's estate being auctioned for the first time. The Hollywood Museum is exhibiting 250 of these items through April 6. The collection of personal and professional pieces are also available for bid online at auctionmystuff.com "The Hollywood Museum is in the historic Max Factor building and is the perfect home for this exhibit since it is actually here where the legendary Max Factor originally designed Marlene Dietrich's glamorous and famous look," said Donelle Dadigan, president and founder of the museum in a statement.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2014 | By Susan King
A 1955 letter to Marlene Dietrich from Ernest Hemingway, which begins with the author referring to the legendary actress as "Dearest Kraut," one of Dietrich's blue and black double breasted tuxedos, a late 19th-century Swiss cylinder music box, several of the star's powder compacts and even a Kermit the Frog watch are among the rare items from Dietrich's estate being auctioned for the first time. The Hollywood Museum is exhibiting 250 of these items through April 6. The collection of personal and professional pieces are also available for bid online at auctionmystuff.com "The Hollywood Museum is in the historic Max Factor building and is the perfect home for this exhibit since it is actually here where the legendary Max Factor originally designed Marlene Dietrich's glamorous and famous look," said Donelle Dadigan, president and founder of the museum in a statement.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2014 | By Hector Tobar
A racy, rambling and funny letter written by Ernest Hemingway to Marlene Dietrich, in which the famous novelist calls the German movie star “Dearest Kraut” and playfully imagines her naked, is going on auction later this month.  Hemingway wrote the letter in 1955 from his estate in Cuba, on letterhead he had made with the property's name, Fincia Vigia. It's up for sale as part of trove of belongings of the late actress that were left to her three grandchildren, the Hollywood Reporter writes . Dietrich was then working in Las Vegas and had written to Hemingway complaining about the staging of her act there.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2014 | By Hector Tobar
A racy, rambling and funny letter written by Ernest Hemingway to Marlene Dietrich, in which the famous novelist calls the German movie star “Dearest Kraut” and playfully imagines her naked, is going on auction later this month.  Hemingway wrote the letter in 1955 from his estate in Cuba, on letterhead he had made with the property's name, Fincia Vigia. It's up for sale as part of trove of belongings of the late actress that were left to her three grandchildren, the Hollywood Reporter writes . Dietrich was then working in Las Vegas and had written to Hemingway complaining about the staging of her act there.
NEWS
December 27, 2001 | MARK SACHS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The cool allure Marlene Dietrich brought to the screen will be on display in abundance during Turner Classic Movies' 19-film festival airing Thursdays through January. But for a revealing glimpse behind the image, "Marlene Dietrich: Her Own Song" offers a haunting counterpoint (TCM, 5 and 8:30 p.m.). Unlike the scores of documentaries on the late actress that have focused on her film credits or cabaret work, this special puts the late icon's medal-winning record of entertaining U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 2006
Aug. 7, 1946: After three years entertaining the troops, Marlene Dietrich returned to Los Angeles, arriving at Lockheed Air Terminal (now Bob Hope Airport), The Times reported in a front-page story. She said she was "so happy to be home I would kiss anybody." Then she "proved it by kissing an unglamorous Times reporter," the newspaper said. The story appeared with a photo of Dietrich perched on the side of a car, one long leg crossed over the other.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2011 | By Kevin Thomas, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It hardly seems possible that there could be room for yet another important biography on so iconic a star as Marlene Dietrich, already the subject of a remarkably candid yet detached memoir by her daughter Maria Riva and of the late Steven Bach's thoughtful and exhaustively researched "Marlene Dietrich: Life and Legend. " Both were published not long after Dietrich's death in Paris at 91 in 1992. Yet Charlotte Chandler's "Marlene: Marlene Dietrich, A Personal Biography" proves invaluable.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 1990 | Reuters
Lendary screen star Marlene Dietrich broke a self-imposed silence today to welcome the unification of the Germany she has not seen for 30 years, saying blood was thicker than water. In a telephone interview from her Paris retreat, Dietrich, 88, said: "Of course I'm happy. Anything that brings people together and encourages peace always makes me happy. Happiness is so rare in this troubled world."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 1986 | CLARKE TAYLOR
"Marlene," which has been playing here to good box office since Nov. 7, has become fashionable beyond film circles. The Council of Fashion Designers of America this year named Marlene Dietrich recipient of its lifetime achievement award for contributions to fashion--in large part because of the film's influence, said Michaele Vollbracht, designer of the stylish film poster for "Marlene" and a member of the council.
NEWS
August 5, 1993 | MARK CHALON SMITH, Mark Chalon Smith is a free-lancer who regularly writes about film for The Times Orange County Edition.
"Destry Rides Again" is a peculiar movie--a pacifist Western with screwball style. James Stewart plays a sheriff who refuses to wear a gun and Marlene Dietrich is the local saloon tart with wild eyes and a very heavy accent. George Marshall's film (screening Friday night as part of the Newport Harbor Art Museum's Dietrich retrospective) is a hoot, just because it's so incongruous.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2014 | By David Colker
Austrian actor Maximilian Schell, 83, whose portrayal of a defense attorney in the 1961 drama "Judgment at Nuremberg" earned him an Academy Award, died Friday in a hospital in Innsbruck, according to his agent Patricia Baumbauer.  Schell had been having lung problems, which led to him being admitted to the hospital, said Baumbauer, reached outside Munich, Germany. Schell's wife, Iva, was with him when he died. He was a prolific actor who was Oscar-nominated for two other roles -- in "Julia" (1977)
NEWS
January 26, 2014 | By Booth Moore, Los Angeles Times Fashion Critic
It's been a banner season for Ralph Lauren on the red carpet. First he dressed fashion It girl Lupita Nyong'o at the Golden Globes and now he has a lock on Madonna for the Grammys. Madonna will be wearing look 49 from the spring 2014 Ralph Lauren collection (above, left), a black cady double-breasted tuxedo jacket, matching wool pants and a white cotton shirt. And ratcheting up the adorable factor, she will be joined at the ceremony by a mini-me. Her son David will be wearing a Ralph Lauren Boys tuxedo.  Of course, Madonna has never met a tuxedo she didn't love.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2013 | By Susan King
Though British actor Lionel Atwill had a long career in theater and in silent movies, it wasn't until the talkies that he came into his own as one of cinema's most menacing villains. Beginning Thursday and continuing through July 25, the American Cinematheque is celebrating the career of the actor with its "Lionel Atwill Lurks Here" series. The malevolent fun begins Thursday at the Egyptian with a triple bill of Atwill delights -- 1939's "Son of Frankenstein," the third film in the "Frankenstein" franchise which inspired Mel Brooks' "Young Frankenstein.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 2011
What German-born superstar was given the U.S. War Department's Medal of Freedom in 1947 for entertaining the American troops in Europe during World War II and being staunchly anti-Nazi? Marlene Dietrich
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2011
Marlene Marlene Dietrich, A Personal Biography Charlotte Chandler Simon & Schuster: 304 pp., $26
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2011 | By Kevin Thomas, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It hardly seems possible that there could be room for yet another important biography on so iconic a star as Marlene Dietrich, already the subject of a remarkably candid yet detached memoir by her daughter Maria Riva and of the late Steven Bach's thoughtful and exhaustively researched "Marlene Dietrich: Life and Legend. " Both were published not long after Dietrich's death in Paris at 91 in 1992. Yet Charlotte Chandler's "Marlene: Marlene Dietrich, A Personal Biography" proves invaluable.
NEWS
July 22, 1993 | MARK CHALON SMITH, Mark Chalon Smith is a free-lancer who regularly writes about film for The Times Orange County Edition.
Marlene Dietrich, like most of the stars from her generation, cultivated mystery. Tidbits about her personal life were handed out by publicists like gourmet candies. Fans were suppose to fill in the rest themselves, at the movies, where they could wonder how exotic and sensual Dietrich really was. Our imaginations helped make Dietrich and others great. That was then, though. Now we want to know everything, even about the long gone.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2010 | By Dennis Lim, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In the popular imagination, the director Josef von Sternberg (1894-1969) will forever be linked with Marlene Dietrich. He made her an international star with "The Blue Angel" (1930) and worked with her on six more movies at Paramount in the '30s, including "Shanghai Express" and "The Devil Is a Woman. " A control-freak director if ever there was one, Von Sternberg took full credit for Dietrich's elevation to iconhood — "Marlene is not Marlene," he once declared, "she is me" — but the screen legend he so obsessively molded dominates his own legacy, overshadowing his other achievements.
IMAGE
February 28, 2010 | Julie Neigher
Forget about the movies: At Oscar time, in homes across America, armchair fashion critics give thumbs up or thumbs down to the clothes worn on the red carpet or on stage as presenters and awardees glam it up. But for everyone who looked at Björk in 2001 and thought "taxidermist," someone else thought "avant-garde." For everyone who thought Edith Head dressed Grace Kelly like a princess in 1955's ice blue satin, someone else thought "ice queen." Face it: No matter how many worst and best lists there are, we're never going to agree about who looked fab or drab.
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