YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsMarriage Equality

Marriage Equality

September 10, 2005 | Tobias Barrington Wolff, TOBIAS BARRINGTON WOLFF teaches law at UC Davis and is on the Equal Justice Society's board of directors.
IF GOV. ARNOLD Schwarzenegger follows through with his planned veto of the historic "marriage equality" bill enacted by the California Legislature, it will be a defining moment in his legacy. A public official who acts as a mere cipher for public opinion has not met the test of leadership. Leadership sometimes calls on officials to challenge us all to recognize principle, and to overcome fear and prejudice in favor of what is right.
May 8, 2012 | By David Lauter
News about same-sex marriage has pointed in two opposite directions recently. Today, unless preelection polls prove drastically wrong, voters in North Carolina will approve a constitutional amendment to ban not only same-sex marriages, but also civil unions as well. On the other hand, for weeks, national Democratic politicians have been virtually tripping over themselves to declare their support for marriage equality, seeking to get ahead of what they see as a shift in public opinion.
June 9, 2013 | By Nathaniel Frank
As Americans await U.S. Supreme Court rulings this month on two same-sex marriage cases, June - the traditional month for weddings and pride parades - gives gay people the chance to reflect: How have their own lives and views changed since a Hawaii court ruling first thrust marriage equality onto the national stage 20 years ago? And what might a fully legal marriage mean to them? For many gay people, including for me, the weight of this prospect has taken a while to sink in. Each time a hurdle to equality is removed, I find myself looking to the next roadblock.
April 11, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
Uruguay is poised to become the second country in South America that allows gay marriage, after lawmakers approved a bill despite the objections of the Roman Catholic Church. President Jose Mujica is widely expected to sign the “equal marriage law,” which the nation's Congress approved Wednesday. The bill removes references to “husband and wife” in marriage contracts, substituting a gender-neutral term, and also allows couples of the same sex to adopt children. “A marriage is a union of two people who love each other,” leftist lawmaker Sebastian Sabini said Wednesday, according to El Observador . ”Nothing more and nothing less.” Before the vote, Catholic bishops in Uruguay said that the law “jeopardizes the rights of the child” and went beyond protecting the rights of gay couples to “assimilate these situations into marriage.” The bishops quoted the words of Pope Francis, who opposed gay marriage while serving as archbishop of Buenos Aires in neighboring Argentina, writing, “The identity and survival of the family is at stake.” Gay marriage opponents lost that fight in Argentina, the first country on the continent to allow same-sex couples to wed, and now appear to have lost it in Uruguay as well.
July 25, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
One year after New York made same-sex marriage legal in the state, a report backed by New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg found that the Marriage Equality Act boosted the economy by $259 million in NYC alone. At least 8,200 same-sex marriage licenses were issued in New York City in the last year, according to a statement from the mayor. That's more than 10% of the 75,000 total licenses issued by the city since July 24, 2011. The weddings helped bring the city $16 million in direct revenue, according to a report conducted by the City Clerk's Office and NYC & Co., the official marketing and tourism agency.
June 27, 2013 | By Paul Whitefield
Wednesday was a big day for human rights. And it was a pretty good day for primate rights too. It was hard to miss news of the Supreme Court's twin rulings that furthered gay rights and marriage equality. Plenty of folks celebrated, including gay couples -- and wedding planners, caterers, florists and, sadly, probably divorce lawyers. Hey, love may be blind, but it's not always forever. Still, big as it was, that wasn't the only news out of Washington. As my colleague Julie Cart reported , “The National Institutes of Health announced Wednesday it would retire the majority of the approximately 360 government-owned chimpanzees currently held in laboratories.” And I'm guessing that, nice as it is that gay folks are making progress on marriage equality, those chimps are equally thrilled that, from now on, they are going to get to be chimps and not medical guinea pigs.
June 27, 2013
Re the Supreme Court's same-sex marriage decisions, June 26 The exhilaration we feel after the two U.S. Supreme Court rulings Wednesday striking a blow for marriage equality overshadows all the anguish we felt that morning on Nov. 5, 2008, when it was clear that California voters had passed Proposition 8. Thankfully, today, California is a marriage equality state. To have heard this good news on the same day that DOMA was overruled is something we never foresaw 32 years ago when we committed our lives to each other.
May 26, 2013 | By David Blankenhorn
Let's be honest: The gay marriage debate is nearly over, and nothing the Supreme Court does when it delivers its opinions on the federal Defense of Marriage Act and on the fate of California's Proposition 8 is likely to change that astonishing fact. A very few years ago, most Americans (including me) viewed the idea of gay marriage as both undesirable and wildly improbable. Today, most Americans (including me) believe that permitting gay and lesbian couples to marry is the right thing to do, a matter of simple justice.
March 29, 2013 | By Michael McGough
After this week's arguments in the Supreme Court over same-sex marriage, the conventional wisdom is that five justices --including perennial swing vote Anthony Kennedy - are likely to strike down the federal Defense of Marriage Act defining marriage for federal purposes as the union of a man and a woman.   Supporters of same-sex marriage should take what they can get, but the likely rationale for such a decision - that Congress unconstitutionally overrode state definitions of marriage - is the ultimate argument of convenience for liberals, an example of what I like to call fair-weather federalism.
June 26, 2013 | By Christie DZurilla
They've been engaged since the end of 2009, but on Wednesday morning Kristen Bell proposed to Dax Shepard in celebration of the Supreme Court's decisions on the Defense of Marriage Act and Prop. 8. (Yes, he popped the question the first time.) "@daxshepard1 will you marry me? Xo #marriageequality #loveislove," she said on Twitter shortly after the decisions came down.  Shepard's tweeted reply? "DOMA is dead. Prop 8 is dead. Now let's bring my big, gay marriage to @IMKristenBell to Life!
Los Angeles Times Articles