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Marriage Equality

OPINION
September 10, 2005 | Tobias Barrington Wolff, TOBIAS BARRINGTON WOLFF teaches law at UC Davis and is on the Equal Justice Society's board of directors.
IF GOV. ARNOLD Schwarzenegger follows through with his planned veto of the historic "marriage equality" bill enacted by the California Legislature, it will be a defining moment in his legacy. A public official who acts as a mere cipher for public opinion has not met the test of leadership. Leadership sometimes calls on officials to challenge us all to recognize principle, and to overcome fear and prejudice in favor of what is right.
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OPINION
May 19, 2012
Reacting to Eric J. Segall's Op-Ed article on Tuesday warning of a gay rights backlash if theU.S. Supreme Court overturns Proposition 8, reader Sara Wan of Malibu wrote: "It is wrong to suggest that pushing for civil liberties should be left to Congress and not include the judicial system. As long as discrimination is legal, it is harder to fight it. "Segall's analogy to past laws banning interracial marriage is incorrect. While there was not a specific push to legalize interracial marriage, the 1967 Supreme Court decision was the direct result of the civil rights movement.
NEWS
March 27, 2013 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON -- Six Democratic senators have announced their support for same-sex marriage in nearly as many days, policy reversals that reflect the changing politics of the issue as the Supreme Court hears arguments in potential landmark cases. Since Sunday, Sens. Claire McCaskill of Missouri, Jon Tester of Montana, John D. "Jay" Rockefeller IV of West Virginia, Mark Warner of Virginia, Mark Begich of Alaska and Kay Hagan of North Carolina issued statements in support of marriage equality, bringing to 47 the total number of senators now in favor.
NEWS
May 8, 2012 | By David Lauter
News about same-sex marriage has pointed in two opposite directions recently. Today, unless preelection polls prove drastically wrong, voters in North Carolina will approve a constitutional amendment to ban not only same-sex marriages, but also civil unions as well. On the other hand, for weeks, national Democratic politicians have been virtually tripping over themselves to declare their support for marriage equality, seeking to get ahead of what they see as a shift in public opinion.
OPINION
June 9, 2013 | By Nathaniel Frank
As Americans await U.S. Supreme Court rulings this month on two same-sex marriage cases, June - the traditional month for weddings and pride parades - gives gay people the chance to reflect: How have their own lives and views changed since a Hawaii court ruling first thrust marriage equality onto the national stage 20 years ago? And what might a fully legal marriage mean to them? For many gay people, including for me, the weight of this prospect has taken a while to sink in. Each time a hurdle to equality is removed, I find myself looking to the next roadblock.
OPINION
June 27, 2013
Re the Supreme Court's same-sex marriage decisions, June 26 The exhilaration we feel after the two U.S. Supreme Court rulings Wednesday striking a blow for marriage equality overshadows all the anguish we felt that morning on Nov. 5, 2008, when it was clear that California voters had passed Proposition 8. Thankfully, today, California is a marriage equality state. To have heard this good news on the same day that DOMA was overruled is something we never foresaw 32 years ago when we committed our lives to each other.
OPINION
September 25, 2007
San Diego Mayor Jerry Sanders showed impressive courage last week when he embraced the right of same-sex couples to marry. The Republican ex-cop had long said he believed civil unions were sufficient for gays, and he planned to veto his City Council's resolution backing a constitutional challenge to California's 2000 voter initiative making marriage possible only between a man and a woman. But he had a crisis of the heart when the resolution came to his desk.
NEWS
June 27, 2013 | By Paul Whitefield
Wednesday was a big day for human rights. And it was a pretty good day for primate rights too. It was hard to miss news of the Supreme Court's twin rulings that furthered gay rights and marriage equality. Plenty of folks celebrated, including gay couples -- and wedding planners, caterers, florists and, sadly, probably divorce lawyers. Hey, love may be blind, but it's not always forever. Still, big as it was, that wasn't the only news out of Washington. As my colleague Julie Cart reported , “The National Institutes of Health announced Wednesday it would retire the majority of the approximately 360 government-owned chimpanzees currently held in laboratories.” And I'm guessing that, nice as it is that gay folks are making progress on marriage equality, those chimps are equally thrilled that, from now on, they are going to get to be chimps and not medical guinea pigs.
NEWS
December 21, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Gay marriage may have benefits that extend beyond social and economic factors. A new study finds that laws permitting same-sex marriage influence the health of gay and bisexual men. The study, published online in the American Journal of Public Health , examined the health impact of same-sex marriage on gay and bisexual men in Massachusetts. Same-sex marriage was legalized in that state in 2003. Researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health surveyed 1,211 patients of a large clinic that specializes in serving sexual minorities and reviewed billing records after the same-sex marriage law was adopted.
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