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NATIONAL
March 14, 2014 | By Joseph Serna
Tennessee has to recognize the same-sex marriages of three couples despite a state constitutional amendment that defines marriage as between a man and woman, a federal judge ruled in a lawsuit Friday. While emphasizing that her preliminary injunction against the state was limited only to the three couples named in the suit, federal Judge Aleta A. Trauger noted that before long, the ban would probably be upended for all same-sex couples in Tennessee. At some point in the future, probably with the aid of further rulings, "in the eyes of the United States Constitution, the plaintiffs' marriages will be placed on equal footing with those of heterosexual couples and ... proscriptions against same-sex marriage will soon become a footnote in the annals of American history," Trauger wrote.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2014 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film critic
"Le Week-End" is a sour and misanthropic film masquerading as an honest and sensitive romance. A painful and unremittingly bleak look at a difficult marriage, it wants us to sit through a range of domestic horrors without offering much of anything as a reward. This is especially disheartening because on an abstract level the film's participants on both sides of the camera are talented individuals with strong resumes. Jim Broadbent and Lindsay Duncan, who star as the unhappy couple, are two of Britain's top actors.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2014 | By Christie D'Zurilla
It ain't over till it's over, at least in the case of Katharine McPhee and her estranged husband, Nick Cokas, who hit a rough spot in October after she was photographed publicly kissing her married "Smash" director.  Though the embarrassing photos initially seemed to be the catalyst for their split, which also went public at the time, word emerged that they'd actually been separated for months prior to that breaking news and that McPhee had...
NATIONAL
March 8, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
Four same-sex couples in Indiana, including two who legally married in other states, filed a federal lawsuit Friday seeking to invalidate the Hoosier State's definition of marriage as being between a man and a woman. The plaintiffs want either to be allowed to wed or to have their marriages recognized by Indiana, granting them in either case the same legal protections as opposite-sex couples. At the center of their argument is the U.S. Supreme Court's decision last year to strike down the federal Defense of Marriage Act on the grounds that it discriminated against same-sex couples.
BUSINESS
March 7, 2014 | By Ronald D. White
Millennials stand out among other generations for their optimism over personal finances and America's future, according to a new national survey released Friday by the Pew Research Center. But the upbeat thinking among the 18-to-33-year-old crowd is also marked by near or at record levels of detachment and distrust of traditional institutions, the report also said. “Millennials are forging a distinctive path into adulthood. " said Paul Taylor, Pew Research Center's executive vice president for special projects and author of the new book "The Next America.
NEWS
March 5, 2014 | By Jenny Deam
DENVER - Citing individual freedom, an evolving definition of family and fairness, and a “big tent” vision for their party, about 20 prominent Western Republicans have thrown their support behind same-sex marriage. The move comes as the U.S. 10th Circuit Court of Appeals in Denver prepares to decide the constitutionality of gay marriage bans in Oklahoma and Utah. Arguments are expected in those cases next month. In a legal brief filed Tuesday, the 20 Republicans urged the court to reject gay-marriage bans as discriminatory.
NATIONAL
March 4, 2014 | By Matt Pearce
Lawyers will appeal a federal judge's ruling that Kentucky's ban on same-sex marriage is unconstitutional, but they won't be state Atty. Gen. Jack Conway's lawyers. In a news conference Tuesday that ended with tears streaming down his face, Conway said that defending the state's ban "would be defending discrimination. "  Conway, a Democrat, began choking up when he mentioned his wife and how he had prayed over a tough decision. (Video of his news conference is shown above.) "In the end, this issue is really larger than any single person, and it's about placing people above politics," Conway told reporters.
NEWS
March 3, 2014 | By Joel Silberman, guest blogger, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
In the wake of a federal judge striking down Texas' gay marriage ban and Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer vetoing an anti-gay bill, I feel compelled to confess something uncomfortable: I was totally wrong about gay marriage. I never opposed gay marriage on principle. I have always believed -- and continue to believe -- that a legal contract available to one pair of people should also be available to another pair of people. Because of equality.  But after seeing how the words “gay marriage” fired up conservative voters in 2004, I found myself arguing with friends both gay and straight that it was the wrong issue at the wrong time.
NATIONAL
March 2, 2014 | Maria L. La Ganga
When Jackie Yerby and a small band of devout Catholics go to the cathedral for Mass this Ash Wednesday, they will be sending an unmistakable message. Pinned to their lapels will be big white buttons that proclaim, "Catholic Oregonians for Marriage Equality. " The newly formed group wants to show that "just because we're Catholic doesn't mean we don't support same-sex marriage," said Yerby, who served on the board of Catholic Charities of Portland for six years. "We support same-sex marriage because we are Catholic.
NATIONAL
February 28, 2014 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
HOUSTON - Mark Phariss almost didn't file the lawsuit that led a judge to overturn the Texas ban on same-sex marriage this week . One reason: Phariss, a Dallas corporate lawyer seeking to marry his partner of several years, has long been friends with one of the conservative state officials he sued: Texas Atty. Gen. Greg Abbott. The two men grew up about 50 miles apart in conservative country - Phariss in Lawton, Okla., Abbott to the south in Wichita Falls, Texas. Later, they became friends during law school and stayed in touch over the years with an occasional meeting or Christmas card.
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