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SCIENCE
July 3, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
Two HIV-positive lymphoma patients who received bone marrow transplants to treat their cancer no longer have detectable virus in their blood cells - even after stopping antiretroviral therapy in recent weeks, researchers reported Wednesday at the International AIDS Society Conference in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. While saying it was too early to declare the men cured, Dr. Timothy Henrich and Dr. Daniel Kuritzkes, both of the division of infectious diseases at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, called the results “exciting” and said they would help guide scientists' efforts to fight HIV.  But bone marrow transplants are highly unlikely to become a standard therapy for people with HIV, Henrich said in an interview with The Times.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
November 12, 2013 | By Stuart Pfeifer
All the amenities of modern medicine are available at a new West Los Angeles hospital. There's 24-hour emergency care, a team of surgeons, psychology and physical therapy units, MRI and CT machines, one of the top oncologists in the country. Medical assistants busily roam the halls, soothing patients' fears with smiles, kind words or gentle touches. But they have to watch out: The patients can bite. They're dogs, cats and other pets being treated at the VCA West Los Angeles Animal Hospital, which at 42,000 square feet is the largest pet hospital west of the Mississippi River.
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SPORTS
July 18, 2013 | By Chuck Schilken
Longtime ESPN journalist and current "Good Morning America" host Robin Roberts gave a moving yet upbeat speech in accepting the Arthur Ashe Courage Award on Wednesday night at the 2013 ESPYs at Nokia Theatre. Roberts is a breast cancer survivor and underwent a bone marrow transplant last fall to treat a life-threatening blood and bone marrow disease.  "Through it all I learned that true strength isn't when you face down life's challenges on your own," Roberts said. "It's when you take them on by accepting the help, faith and love of others and knowing you are lucky to have those.
SPORTS
July 18, 2013 | By Chuck Schilken
Longtime ESPN journalist and current "Good Morning America" host Robin Roberts gave a moving yet upbeat speech in accepting the Arthur Ashe Courage Award on Wednesday night at the 2013 ESPYs at Nokia Theatre. Roberts is a breast cancer survivor and underwent a bone marrow transplant last fall to treat a life-threatening blood and bone marrow disease.  "Through it all I learned that true strength isn't when you face down life's challenges on your own," Roberts said. "It's when you take them on by accepting the help, faith and love of others and knowing you are lucky to have those.
WORLD
November 19, 2008 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
Doctors have given a woman a new windpipe with tissue grown from her own bone marrow's stem cells, eliminating the need for anti-rejection drugs. The case of tuberculosis patient Claudia Castillo, a 30-year-old Colombian living in Barcelona, was published online today in the medical journal the Lancet. Scientists and doctors in Italy and Britain stripped the cells off a donor windpipe, leaving only a tube of connective tissue, and produced millions of cartilage and tissue cells from Castillo's marrow to cover it. Once they were in place, the trachea was transplanted into Castillo in June.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 1988
Charles Perry wrote that "there is no cure for taking too much hot pepper" ("Hot News About Eating Chile Peppers," July 13). But there is! In Acapulco a few years ago I was eating something with (hot!) peppers in it that was accompanied by a small bowl of bone marrow broth. I just thought it was another sauce for the food, and wanted to use the spoon in the bowl for something else, so I licked it off the spoon. The burning in my mouth completely went away. Of course, I used this broth throughout the rest of the meal.
NEWS
August 5, 1986
Dr. Robert P. Gale, a UCLA bone marrow specialist, said the death toll from the Soviet Union's Chernobyl nuclear disaster on April 26 has risen to 30, confirming reports of Western journalists who found two new graves in a special cemetery plot near Moscow for Chernobyl victims. Gale, who has just completed another Soviet visit to help treat Chernobyl victims, was interviewed in Tel Aviv.
NEWS
August 28, 1986 | Associated Press
The UCLA doctor who treated Chernobyl victims said today that health experts believe that as many as 75,000 people could die worldwide during the next 70 years from cancers caused by the Soviet nuclear plant disaster. Dr. Robert Gale, a bone-marrow specialist, said a minimum of 1,000 Chernobyl-related cancer deaths are expected worldwide, adding that experts believe that "the truth will lie between the extremes."
NEWS
December 14, 1986
Folk singer and songwriter Kate Wolf, long a victim of leukemia, is dead at age 44. A singer for about 20 years, Miss Wolf, who had suffered complications from bone-marrow surgery, died Wednesday night at University of California Medical Center in San Francisco. Her friends in the Bay Area, Los Angeles and Boston had staged benefits in recent months to defray her medical expenses.
FOOD
June 19, 1986 | MERLE ELLIS
Question: "I enjoy your column very much, but sometimes I think you live more in the past than I do. You recommend adding beef suet to beef when grinding, and you call for beef suet in your Mom's mincemeat recipe. Where, pray tell, do you find beef suet? Most butchers don't even know what it is. And have you tried to get any marrow bones lately? I love poached marrow on toast but haven't been able to find marrow bones for years. What's happened?" Answer: Times have changed in the meat business.
SCIENCE
July 11, 2013 | By Melissa Pandika
Italian researchers have used a defanged version of HIV to replace faulty genes - and eliminate devastating symptoms - in children suffering two rare and fatal genetic diseases. Improved gene therapy techniques prevented the onset of metachromatic leukodystrophy in three young children and halted the progression of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome in three others. The advance represents a major stride for a field that has struggled to translate experimental successes in lab animals into safe and effective treatments for people, experts said.
SCIENCE
July 3, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
Two HIV-positive lymphoma patients who received bone marrow transplants to treat their cancer no longer have detectable virus in their blood cells - even after stopping antiretroviral therapy in recent weeks, researchers reported Wednesday at the International AIDS Society Conference in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. While saying it was too early to declare the men cured, Dr. Timothy Henrich and Dr. Daniel Kuritzkes, both of the division of infectious diseases at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, called the results “exciting” and said they would help guide scientists' efforts to fight HIV.  But bone marrow transplants are highly unlikely to become a standard therapy for people with HIV, Henrich said in an interview with The Times.
NEWS
January 29, 2013 | By Monte Morin
As Iraq war veteran Brendan Marrocco recovers from an extremely rare double arm transplant, experts in the field of reconstructive transplantation say the surgery's ultimate success depends heavily on a patient's immune system response and nerve tissue regeneration. Marrocco, 26, underwent the 13-hour procedure Dec. 18 and appeared at a news conference Tuesday to answer questions with his surgeon, Dr. W.P. Andrew Lee. The procedure, which involved 16 surgeons, was performed at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2012 | Los Angeles Times staff and wire reports
E. Donnall Thomas, a physician who pioneered the use of bone marrow transplants in leukemia patients and won the 1990 Nobel Prize in medicine, died Saturday in Seattle of heart disease. He was 92. The Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, which Thomas joined in 1974, announced his death. Thomas' work is among the greatest success stories in the treatment of cancer. Bone marrow transplantation and its sister therapy, blood stem cell transplantation, have improved the survival rates for patients with some blood cancers to around 90% from almost zero.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 2012 | By Angel Jennings, Los Angeles Times
Episcopal Bishop J. Jon Bruno, head of the six-county Los Angeles diocese, has been diagnosed with leukemia and is undergoing aggressive treatment to fight the disease. The 65-year-old bishop said in an open letter that he had been suffering from what he thought was a bout of pneumonia since March. He underwent further tests after treatment failed to cure the "nagging problem. " Doctors at Good Samaritan Hospital discovered that Bruno had acute monocytic leukemia, a form of blood cancer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2012 | By Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
A federal appeals court Tuesday unanimously rejected a request from the Obama administration to reconsider a ruling that bone marrow donors can be compensated for providing the life-saving stem cells from their blood. None of the 25 active judges on the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals took up the petition by Atty. Gen. Eric H. Holder Jr., asking for the full court to review a December ruling that the government fears could lead to money influencing donation decisions. The Dec. 1 ruling by a three-judge panel redefined bone marrow cells harvested from a donor's bloodstream as blood parts, not organ parts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1989 | GENE YASUDA, Times Staff Writer
Like most 13-year-olds, Joshua Kaplan leads a busy life. He collects baseball cards, commands remote-controlled cars, roots for the Padres, smacks a few tennis balls and brings Bach to life on the living-room piano. But, unlike his friends, Joshua works hard at something else--staying alive. Joshua suffers from leukemia. "When I'm at school all day, I really don't think about it," said Joshua, who lives with his family in Leucadia. "But, sometimes when I'm alone, it's like, 'Wow, how can this be happening to me?
SCIENCE
July 11, 2013 | By Melissa Pandika
Italian researchers have used a defanged version of HIV to replace faulty genes - and eliminate devastating symptoms - in children suffering two rare and fatal genetic diseases. Improved gene therapy techniques prevented the onset of metachromatic leukodystrophy in three young children and halted the progression of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome in three others. The advance represents a major stride for a field that has struggled to translate experimental successes in lab animals into safe and effective treatments for people, experts said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 2012 | By Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
The Obama administration has asked a federal appeals court to reconsider its ruling that most bone marrow donors can be compensated for providing life-saving marrow cells harvested from their bloodstreams. A three-judge panel of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled unanimously on Dec. 1 that bone marrow filtered from a donor's blood was a blood part, not an organ part, and could be legally sold. But in a petition for rehearing by a full 11-judge panel of the court, Atty.
FOOD
December 8, 2011
Jennifer McLagan has a knack for tackling topics that are, shall we say, "under-appreciated". To complete a "trilogy" of sorts, the author follows up her award-winning "Bones" and "Fat" with "Odd Bits: How to Cook the Rest of the Animal. " Full-on nose-to-tail eating, she leaves nothing uncovered, and no scrap unused. Wonderfully thorough, McLagan knows her subject inside and out, and she explores every last tidbit from almost every animal imaginable, from cockscombs to testicles.
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