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Mars Planet

SCIENCE
April 7, 2007 | John Johnson Jr., Times Staff Writer
Global warming on Mars? It turns out you don't need belching smokestacks and city-choking traffic to heat up a planet. Changes in surface reflectivity may also do the trick, according to research published Thursday in the journal Nature. The research team, composed of scientists from NASA's Ames Research Center in Northern California and the U.S. Geological Survey, compared images of Mars taken by the Viking missions in the 1970s to pictures taken a quarter century later by Mars Global Surveyor.
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SCIENCE
March 31, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
China and Russia will mount a joint effort to explore Mars and one of its moons in 2009, Chinese state media reported Wednesday. A Russian rocket will lift a Chinese satellite and Russian exploration vehicle to survey Mars and Phobos, the innermost and biggest of the red planet's moons, the state-run China Daily reported, citing China's National Space Administration.
SCIENCE
March 16, 2007 | John Johnson Jr., Times Staff Writer
The ice at Mars' south pole contains enough water to cover the planet in an ocean 36 feet deep, scientists said today. Observations by the European Space Agency's Mars Express orbiter determined the ice -- largely covered by dust and rock -- is more than two miles thick in places and is nearly pure water, according to research being published in the journal Science.
SCIENCE
February 17, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Lasers beamed from space have detected what researchers have long suspected: big sloshing lakes of water underneath Antarctic ice. These lakes, some stretching across hundreds of square miles, fill and drain so dramatically that the movement can be seen by a satellite, glaciologists reported this week in the journal Science. The lakes lie beneath 2,300 feet of compressed snow and ice.
SCIENCE
February 10, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
NASA is investigating problems with two instruments aboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, the agency announced this week. In November, scientists operating the probe's high-resolution camera noticed an increase in image "noise," such as bad pixels. A problem also developed in an instrument that maps temperature, ice clouds and dust in the atmosphere. Scientists discovered the instrument had a skewed field of view.
SCIENCE
February 3, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Scientists are scrambling to find an alternative landing site for a long-armed robot set to launch this summer on a mission to dig into Mars' icy north pole. The original landing spot was nixed after images beamed back by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter showed scores of bus-sized boulders littered over old crater rims on flat plains. The gigantic rocks pose a danger to NASA's Phoenix Mars lander.
SCIENCE
January 27, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Scientists trying to find out where all the water on Mars went have ruled out one suspect: The sun did not blow it away, new measurements show. They measured ions -- charged particles -- being blown off the planet by the solar wind, itself a stream of charged particles, according to their report published Friday in the journal Science.
SCIENCE
December 7, 2006 | John Johnson Jr., Times Staff Writer
NASA scientists announced Wednesday that they have found evidence that water still flows on the surface of Mars in the form of sporadic gushers that increase the possibility that the Red Planet harbors some form of life. Using images obtained by the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft, the researchers concluded that changes in the shapes and sizes of gullies cut into the walls of two Martian craters were probably made by flowing water. The team looked at two sets of images taken several years apart.
SCIENCE
November 22, 2006 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
After two weeks of futilely searching for the Mars Global Surveyor, NASA and Jet Propulsion Laboratory officials said Tuesday that the missing spacecraft was probably lost forever. In its 10-year career, the probe has sent back more than 240,000 images of the red planet, providing the first strong evidence that water flowed there as recently as 100,000 years ago. It also charted weather cycles and mapped landing sites for the two rovers now operating on the Martian surface.
SCIENCE
September 30, 2006 | John Johnson Jr., Times Staff Writer
Twenty-one months after landing on the surface of Mars, NASA's rover Opportunity is poised to look deeper into the Red Planet's watery history than ever before. The rover has reached the crest of 230-foot-deep Victoria Crater, whose exposed rock walls hold secrets of the planet's ancient past, including the time when scientists think shallow pools of water existed on the surface. "This is a geologist's dream come true," said lead scientist Steve Squyres of Cornell University.
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