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NEWS
September 30, 1993 | JON MATSUMOTO
When it appeared 11 years ago, Marshall Crenshaw's marvelously engaging debut album seemed transported from another era; it was infused with such buoyant innocence and uncluttered pop-rock craftsmanship that it almost sounded like the spirit of Buddy Holly had been reborn in this young Detroit native.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2000 | RANDY LEWIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Punk rock's energy and anyone-can-do-it ethic brought welcome contrast to the bloated stuff that typified mainstream rock music in the late '70s. But with gain often comes loss, and the sacrifice for the new emotional vitality of punk and its more polished younger sibling, new wave, was tangible melody and harmony. The model of melodic pop invention set down by the Beatles often seemed lost as the venting of youthful anger, alienation and frustration took precedence over musical creativity.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 1991 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Judging from some of the adjectives that have been used to describe Marshall Crenshaw's performing style, you'd think he was Clark Kent on a block without phone booths. "Unassuming," "low-key," "understated," "self-effacing" and, of course, "mild-mannered" are the sorts of tags that have cropped up in reviews of Crenshaw's concerts over the years. Maybe it's the eyeglasses.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 1996 | JOHN ROOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For Marshall Crenshaw, a seedy motel room helped turn a scowl into one big smile. Four years ago, the respected but commercially undervalued pop-rocker had become disillusioned by the record business. Making "Life's Too Short," his first and last album for MCA, had been such a negative experience, he says, that when it was done, he didn't even want to think about going back into a studio.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 1996 | JOHN ROOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For Marshall Crenshaw, a seedy motel room helped turn a scowl into one big smile. Four years ago, the respected but commercially undervalued pop-rocker had become disillusioned by the record business. Making "Life's Too Short," his first and last album for MCA, had been such a negative experience, he says, that when it was done, he didn't even want to think about going back into a studio.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 1988
I see Bob Dylan is touring with Marshall Crenshaw this year. Is this one called the Marshall-Dylan Tour? MARCUS VINCENT ALVA Sylmar
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 1996
Tickets go on sale today for the Social Distortion with D Generation show Nov. 14 at the Hollywood Palladium. . . . Dan Hicks & His Acoustic Warriors play Nov. 1 at the Coach House in San Juan Capistrano. . . . Marshall Crenshaw will be at the Galaxy Concert Theatre in Santa Ana on Nov. 17.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2000 | RANDY LEWIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Punk rock's energy and anyone-can-do-it ethic brought welcome contrast to the bloated stuff that typified mainstream rock music in the late '70s. But with gain often comes loss, and the sacrifice for the new emotional vitality of punk and its more polished younger sibling, new wave, was tangible melody and harmony. The model of melodic pop invention set down by the Beatles often seemed lost as the venting of youthful anger, alienation and frustration took precedence over musical creativity.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1986 | JON MATSUMOTO
"SONGS FROM THE FILM," Tommy Keene. Geffen. Keene's rock-anchored folk-pop basically falls into the Marshall Crenshaw category, and the Baltimore-bred singer has conjured up a handful of attractive, heart-on-your-sleeve tunes on his debut LP. With its jangly guitars and spruced-up drum and bass sound, the yearning "Places That Are Gone" is one of the better entries from the current glut of small-town boy nostalgia pieces.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 1986 | STEVE HOCHMAN
Marshall Crenshaw might still be a great white hope of pop music. Even though his three critically lauded albums have been commercially ignored, the New York-based singer-guitarist sounded as sharp as ever Saturday at the Palace. Where others might have thrown in the towel by now, Crenshaw shows no signs of submission. His commercial struggle is hard to explain, because his catchy, charming songs have a timeless quality that would sound great on radio.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 1996
Tickets go on sale today for the Social Distortion with D Generation show Nov. 14 at the Hollywood Palladium. . . . Dan Hicks & His Acoustic Warriors play Nov. 1 at the Coach House in San Juan Capistrano. . . . Marshall Crenshaw will be at the Galaxy Concert Theatre in Santa Ana on Nov. 17.
NEWS
September 30, 1993 | JON MATSUMOTO
When it appeared 11 years ago, Marshall Crenshaw's marvelously engaging debut album seemed transported from another era; it was infused with such buoyant innocence and uncluttered pop-rock craftsmanship that it almost sounded like the spirit of Buddy Holly had been reborn in this young Detroit native.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 1991 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Judging from some of the adjectives that have been used to describe Marshall Crenshaw's performing style, you'd think he was Clark Kent on a block without phone booths. "Unassuming," "low-key," "understated," "self-effacing" and, of course, "mild-mannered" are the sorts of tags that have cropped up in reviews of Crenshaw's concerts over the years. Maybe it's the eyeglasses.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 1989 | JIM LEWIS, United Press International
Foster & Lloyd figure they wouldn't have been around very long in country music if they had shown up about 10 years ago. That's because nobody in country radio would have played their records. But Radney Foster, who hails from Del Rio, Tex., and Bill Lloyd, a native of Bowling Green, Ky., figure that they lucked out. "We were at the right place at the right time," Foster said. Foster & Lloyd are country rockers, or rocking countrians, depending on the way one looks at things.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 1988
I see Bob Dylan is touring with Marshall Crenshaw this year. Is this one called the Marshall-Dylan Tour? MARCUS VINCENT ALVA Sylmar
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 1989 | JIM LEWIS, United Press International
Foster & Lloyd figure they wouldn't have been around very long in country music if they had shown up about 10 years ago. That's because nobody in country radio would have played their records. But Radney Foster, who hails from Del Rio, Tex., and Bill Lloyd, a native of Bowling Green, Ky., figure that they lucked out. "We were at the right place at the right time," Foster said. Foster & Lloyd are country rockers, or rocking countrians, depending on the way one looks at things.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 1987 | DUNCAN STRAUSS
The folks who cast Marshall Crenshaw as Buddy Holly in the upcoming "La Bamba" movie probably aren't too worried about the audience suspending its disbelief. After all, Crenshaw is portraying a bespectacled singer-songwriter whose music is steeped in a timeless purity and simplicity--which pretty much describes Crenshaw himself.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1986 | JON MATSUMOTO
"SONGS FROM THE FILM," Tommy Keene. Geffen. Keene's rock-anchored folk-pop basically falls into the Marshall Crenshaw category, and the Baltimore-bred singer has conjured up a handful of attractive, heart-on-your-sleeve tunes on his debut LP. With its jangly guitars and spruced-up drum and bass sound, the yearning "Places That Are Gone" is one of the better entries from the current glut of small-town boy nostalgia pieces.
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