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Marshall Plan

NEWS
May 27, 1997 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the opening salvo of his campaign to persuade the American public to accept NATO expansion, President Clinton told a crowd gathered for Memorial Day observances that "extending the reach of security and prosperity" to some former Communist nations is a natural outgrowth of the Marshall Plan that saved Europe 50 years ago.
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NEWS
January 29, 1997 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Algerian diplomat appointed as the U.N.'s special envoy to Zaire, Burundi and Rwanda said Tuesday that it may take a huge injection of Western aid--a "mini-Marshall Plan"--to halt the spiral of violence in the war-ravaged Central African nations. Mohamed Sahnoun will go to Africa next week to try to halt the bloodshed, which includes a civil war in Zaire and a cycle of attacks and reprisals by ethnic Hutus and Tutsis in Rwanda and Burundi.
NEWS
August 19, 1995
Milton Katz, 87, a Harvard Law School professor who was administrator of the Marshall Plan to rebuild Europe after World War II. During the war, Katz first served as part of the War Production Board and the Combined Production and Resources Board and later as a lieutenant commander in the Navy Reserve.
SPORTS
January 5, 1995 | MARTIN BECK
When Concordia men's basketball Coach Greg Marshall set up the Eagles' schedule, he noted two games that would test their early progress. First, in early December, there was Northern Arizona, an NCAA Division I team. Result: Concordia 73, Northern Arizona 67. Then, Tuesday, there was Division II Cal State San Bernardino, which was on a 10-game winning streak. "We were quite anxious to find out what the result was going to be, and I was really pleasantly surprised," Marshall said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 1994 | SCOTT SHIBUYA BROWN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In retrospect, Jan. 6, 1990, could be viewed as the luckiest, and possibly the unluckiest, day of A. Bernard Silver's life. It was on that otherwise quiet Sunday that the retired civil servant from Palm Springs won big in the California lottery, beating out 15.3 million other entries for $10.3 million, a sum that came to $415,200 a year, after taxes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 1993 | VLADIMIR KLIMENKO, Vladimir Klimenko, an American journalist of Russian descent, recently returned to Washington after three years in Moscow. and
Barely two months after Boris Yeltsin delivered what seemed like a decisive blow against his conservative opponents, a more dangerous challenge to democracy has emerged in the figure of Vladimir Zhirinovsky, the champion of Russia's politics of resentment. The man who would be Fuhrer promises a new Russia cleansed of Western influence. Like Hitler before him, Zhirinovsky equates the collapse of his country's former empire with national humiliation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 1993 | GEOFF BOUCHER
The Board of Supervisors on Tuesday will consider a sizable staff reorganization in the county marshal's office that officials say will save the county $834,000 each year. The marshal's office--which handles security in the county's courtrooms and serves warrants and evictions--drafted the plan, which would eliminate nine jobs while reshuffling a dozen others. While the plan falls in line with the county's belt-tightening effort, Marshal Michael S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 1993
The agreement by which the late Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall donated his papers to the Library of Congress stipulates that after his death "the collection shall be made available to the public at the discretion of the library." Librarian of Congess James H. Billington, basing his decision partly on a personal meeting with Marshall, has opened the papers.
SPORTS
March 14, 1993 | ROSS NEWHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mike Marshall, the former Dodger, sits in the Seattle Mariners' clubhouse with no guarantees. He is 33, back from a bad experience in Japan, and trying to win a job as the Mariners' right-handed designated hitter, his onetime promise rubbed out on too many trainer's tables. "I'd by lying if I said it wasn't frustrating," Marshall said of the misplaced opportunities. "I'd be lying if I said I didn't think I could be sitting here with 2,000 hits, 300 home runs and a $5-million contract.
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