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Martha Scott

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1989 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
Thornton Wilder's "Our Town" qualifies as one of the most durable, indelible, prototypically American plays of them all. It is a hymn to the universal cycles of birth, love and death as revealed in the life of a small New England town. Yet Martha Scott, the actress who was the original Emily in "Our Town" in 1938, was remembering at lunch the other day how the play nearly died in rehearsals before the public ever saw it, and how it almost expired again in Boston before it could reach New York.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 2003 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Martha Scott, who originated the role of Emily in Thornton Wilder's Pulitzer Prize-winning play "Our Town" and earned a 1940 best actress Oscar nomination re-creating the role in her film debut, has died. She was 90. Scott, who alternated between theater and films during her more than six-decade career, died Wednesday of natural causes in a hospital in Van Nuys, said her son, Scott Alsop.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 2003 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Martha Scott, who originated the role of Emily in Thornton Wilder's Pulitzer Prize-winning play "Our Town" and earned a 1940 best actress Oscar nomination re-creating the role in her film debut, has died. She was 90. Scott, who alternated between theater and films during her more than six-decade career, died Wednesday of natural causes in a hospital in Van Nuys, said her son, Scott Alsop.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1998 | JAN HERMAN
"Our Town' was Thornton Wilder's first full-length play. Unusual for its time, even considered experimental, the original production had a tryout performance on Jan. 22, 1938, at the McCarter Theatre in Princeton, N.J. The next morning, the company left for a two-week run in Boston, where the critics hated it. One wrote: "When we arrived the curtain was up and there was no scenery on the stage. We wondered if there was going to be a play. After watching for two hours, we still wonder."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1998 | JAN HERMAN
"Our Town' was Thornton Wilder's first full-length play. Unusual for its time, even considered experimental, the original production had a tryout performance on Jan. 22, 1938, at the McCarter Theatre in Princeton, N.J. The next morning, the company left for a two-week run in Boston, where the critics hated it. One wrote: "When we arrived the curtain was up and there was no scenery on the stage. We wondered if there was going to be a play. After watching for two hours, we still wonder."
NEWS
November 30, 1995 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jeffrey Lynn, the durable actor whose film career as the handsome romantic husband or boyfriend flourished in the late 1930s and 1940s, has died. He was 86. Lynn died Friday at St. Joseph's Hospital in Burbank after a stroke, said his daughter, Letitia Lynn. Born Ragnar Godfrey Lind in Auburn, Mass., Lynn legally changed his name to his stage name in 1942, noting that he wanted to serve his country during World War II under the name that had become popular.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2004
David GRITTEN suggests in his piece on Oliver Stone's "Alexander" ["Fearsome Phalanx," Sept. 12] that the director's decision to feature English-accented actors playing Greeks in contrast to using performers with an Irish brogue to play Macedonians is either "eccentric" or "inspired." While it may be the former according to one's taste in such things, the director's choice is most definitely inspired by an earlier film. Director William Wyler cast British actors (Jack Hawkins, Stephen Boyd and others)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 1993 | SUSAN KING, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Novel Tour: After writing 39 plays, Jerome Lawrence, who co-wrote "Auntie Mame" and "Inherit the Wind" with Robert E. Lee, has made a career detour from playwriting to fiction with his first novel, "A Golden Circle," based on the late acting teacher Stella Adler and the 1930s Algonquin Round Table literary circle. Lawrence's two-month book-signing tour begins with a dramatic presentation by actress Holland Taylor at Brentano's, 10250 Santa Monica Blvd., Century City, on Monday at 7:30 p.m.
NEWS
July 23, 1992
Entertainment industry notables, from producer Samuel Z. Arkoff to singer Luther Vandross, have been chosen to be added to the Hollywood Walk of Fame, a spokeswoman for the Hollywood Chamber of Commerce said. Selected honorees, by category, are: Movies--Arkoff; actors Chevy Chase, Richard Farnsworth, Anna Lee, Pat Morita, Jason Robards and Meryl Streep; directors Arthur Cohn and Oliver Stone, and Bugs Bunny animator Friz Freleng.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1989 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
Thornton Wilder's "Our Town" qualifies as one of the most durable, indelible, prototypically American plays of them all. It is a hymn to the universal cycles of birth, love and death as revealed in the life of a small New England town. Yet Martha Scott, the actress who was the original Emily in "Our Town" in 1938, was remembering at lunch the other day how the play nearly died in rehearsals before the public ever saw it, and how it almost expired again in Boston before it could reach New York.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 2001 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rosemary DeCamp, the venerable actress whose work ranged from radio to motion pictures to television, including leading roles in "The Life of Riley" and "The Bob Cummings Show," has died. She was 90. DeCamp, who also was a respected copper enamel artist, died Tuesday in her Torrance home of complications of pneumonia, said her daughter, Martha Weber. The attractive but always matronly actress looked like the warm, capable mother in the kitchen baking cookies for her children after school.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2000 | BILL DESOWITZ
The Revolutionary War generally hasn't fared well on the screen. Here's a list of some of the films: * D.W. Griffith's "America" (1924) is an ambitious attempt to cram as much fabled history and Victorian romance as possible into a Revolutionary War story, but it's no "Birth of a Nation," a stunning film about the Civil War despite its abhorrent racial politics.
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