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Martin Bauer

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BUSINESS
March 20, 1998 | MARLA MATZER
Former United Talent Agency President and Bauer Benedek Agency founder Martin Bauer has formed his own talent management/production company, Bauer Co. The announcement came five months after Bauer stepped down as president of UTA and served as a consultant to the agency until earlier this month. Bauer co-founded UTA in 1990, when Bauer Benedek merged with the Leading Artists agency.
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BUSINESS
March 20, 1998 | MARLA MATZER
Former United Talent Agency President and Bauer Benedek Agency founder Martin Bauer has formed his own talent management/production company, Bauer Co. The announcement came five months after Bauer stepped down as president of UTA and served as a consultant to the agency until earlier this month. Bauer co-founded UTA in 1990, when Bauer Benedek merged with the Leading Artists agency.
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SPORTS
June 22, 1991
Wayne Lukas has shown his true class, or lack thereof, by his need to publicly humiliate Gary Stevens for his ride on Farma Way. We all know how perfect Mr. Lukas is, as evidenced by his purchase of Houston for $2.7 million. MARTIN R. BAUER, Beverly Hills
NEWS
September 16, 1992 | BETTY GOODWIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"It's really easy to be safe right now, and this is not safe art," collector Susan Gersh told Ruth Bloom. "I've never been safe in my life," said Bloom at the opening of Ruth Bloom Gallery in Santa Monica Thursday night. Though art galleries across town are shutting down at a disturbing rate (the new gallery was previously the location of her Meyers/Bloom Gallery, which dissolved in May), Bloom told Gersh she can deal with the risk of doing business in an uncertain economic climate.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 1991 | NINA J. EASTON
Hollywood is still suffering a hangover from its recent spending binges. Over the past three years, the average cost of a movie has jumped more than 40%--to $27 million. In the last year, those skyrocketing costs ran smack into a worrisome dip in box-office receipts. Now studio executives are talking about lessons learned and the need to change course. But are studios serious about saying no? Some of them seem to be.
BUSINESS
June 8, 1989 | MICHAEL CIEPLY, Times Staff Writer
Paramount Communications Inc.'s surprise attack on the Time-Warner merger could mark a step in the evolution of Hollywood's big companies from clubby competitors to warring--and acquisition-hungry--media empires. "Feuds have gone on for years. But the stakes are much, much higher now. . . . Everybody's in play when something like this happens," the head of a major studio said of Paramount's attempt to disrupt Warner's planned merger with Time by making a cash offer for the New York publishing giant.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 2006 | Carina Chocano, Times Staff Writer
"He mooned me," Anna Holtz (Diane Kruger) confesses to her persnickety engineer boyfriend, Martin Bauer (Matthew Goode), relating another day at the office with her new boss, Ludwig van Beethoven. This disclosure would be disconcerting enough if Beethoven's death didn't predate the expression (or at least its current usage) by about 140 years.
BUSINESS
May 2, 1991 | ALAN CITRON and NINA EASTON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
On the same day that it celebrated the theatrical re-release of "Citizen Kane," the classic film that delves deeply into the power of the media, Paramount Pictures filled its own power vacuum by confirming that Brandon Tartikoff has been named as its new studio chief. News of the appointment drew mostly positive notices from people inside and outside the company.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 1986 | DAVID T. FRIENDLY, Times Staff Writer
In 1979, literary agent Martin Bauer passed on an offer that seemed too good to refuse. United Artists was willing to pay $1.5 million for the movie rights to "Thy Neighbor's Wife," Gay Talese's treatise on sex in America. Bauer turned UA down, figuring he could get even more. He was right. In the end, UA coughed up a record-setting $2.5 million. Incredibly, no movie was ever made from the book. Seven years later, the book business has undergone a chapter and verse metamorphosis.
NEWS
August 4, 1988 | MICHAEL CIEPLY, Times Staff Writer
Hollywood producers and writers reached a tentative agreement Wednesday to end a crippling 150-day strike by the Writers Guild of America, one of the longest in film industry history. The breakthrough came in an all-night bargaining session engineered by entertainment lawyer Kenneth Ziffren. The 15 hours of talks resolved a seemingly intractable dispute over residuals to writers for programs sold overseas, which had blocked repeated settlement efforts.
NEWS
November 5, 1993 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Robert Koehler writes regularly about theater for The Times
The Dirty Secret Play used to be constructed in long, developing dramatic arcs, usually involving families. By the end, the clan was laid bare, beaten and purged. Think of the father, for instance, in Arthur Miller's "All My Sons," with his secret about his murderous engineering scams. That was a Dirty Big Secret Play. In the '90s, it has evolved into the Dirty Little Secret Play--so little, in fact, that the secrets aren't even worth the wait.
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