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Martin Bernheimer

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 1985
After hearing that he was a crafty old stooge who didn't like anything, it's past time for a letter in praise of Martin Bernheimer. In "The Beckmesser Awards" (Dec. 30) he shows a rare humanity, a discerning wit and a sweet-and-sour smile. We are fortunate to have him. P.S. Most Compassionate Cynic (award): Martin Bernheimer. GREG GOTTLIEB Long Beach
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 1997
After decades of Martin Bernheimer's barbs, it is hard to adjust to the sweetness of current Times music critic Mark Swed. Take for instance recent weeks of the music season. From Swed's words, readers would have no idea that both the L.A. Opera and L.A. Philharmonic have run aground. What fun Bernheimer would have had reporting on L.A. Opera's amplified and penny-pinched operetta "Countess Maritza" or its miscast "Fedora"--surely the weakest opening in the company's 12-year history.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1996
Bravo and thank you, Martin Bernheimer! The Verdi of music critics. Never content with mediocrity. For the insight, knowledge, wit, brilliant and delicious way with words. Always candid and passionate about the arts. A humanist, long overdue for another Pulitzer Prize. Auf Wiedersehen, keep in touch. ANNE LUCKERMAN Tustin
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1996
Without reading the byline of "A Pipe Dream Come True" (May 26), I was astonished that Martin Bernheimer should be replaced by such a perfect protege(e) so quickly. Halfway through the piece I went back to the byline and was delighted and relieved that it was Bernheimer in fact. I'm delighted that no fresh writer is able to spill ink on prose so stupidly snooty and awkward in a major newspaper about anything as important as a small two-day music festival in the provinces (Mr. Bernheimer remains inimitable)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 1990
The question of the ages: What does Martin Bernheimer want? His myopic, mean-spirited review of Opera Pacific's "Don Giovanni" ("A Dark, Dismal 'Don Giovanni' in Costa Mesa," Calendar, Feb. 23) does a disservice to that masterfully mounted opera and to opera in general. CELIA TURNER, Newport Beach
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1986
Whitney Houston is obviously beautiful and talented. She may also be principled and well-intentioned. However, it struck me as somewhat inappropriate when she thanked God for a hit song ("Saving All My Love for You") about adultery. LEE MARSHALL Los Angeles Martin Bernheimer slaps around the Grammys on Page 57.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 1991
Having donated the supertitle equipment used by Opera Pacific, we are appalled to read Martin Bernheimer's constant attacks on the use of this equipment. Practically every time he reviews Opera Pacific, he manages to carp on this. The use of supertitles has made opera accessible to significant numbers of people who would not otherwise be privy to intricacies of the libretto. Not everyone (this includes us) has access to the musical background or possesses the linguistic skills that Mr. Bernheimer has. His constant bad-mouthing smacks of elitism.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 1996
It is with profound regret that I read that Martin Bernheimer is leaving his post at The Times. From Day 1 of his tenure I have been reading his reports on the local, national and international music scene, especially when it came to opera. He wrote with flair, style, insight, penetrating wit and sarcasm, the ingredients of being a superb music critic. His vocabulary was incisive and encyclopedic, which made me scurry more than once to the Oxford Dictionary for illumination. I remember what Kurt Herbert Adler, the late general director of the San Francisco Opera, said when asked whether he ever read a music critic's opinion.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 1996
I will miss Martin Bernheimer's criticism ("Times Critic Bernheimer to Leave After 30 Years," Feb. 15). He has frequently amused me, occasionally enraged me, often educated me . . . but never bored me. PHIL PETTY Newport Beach We are sorry that Martin Bernheimer is leaving The Times, but we realize that 30 years is a long time to be in such a demanding position. We have enjoyed his definitive reviews and commentaries (sometimes agreeing, and disagreeing at other times)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 1996
I have just spent a month in Los Angeles and have been delighted by the insight and wit of Martin Bernheimer's music reviews. There is an interesting person behind the savvy writing, and I'm told he got a Pulitzer for it too. Alas, I am back in New York where our New York Times music reporters are bland and faceless. MARSHALL IZEN New York
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1996
Bravo and thank you, Martin Bernheimer! The Verdi of music critics. Never content with mediocrity. For the insight, knowledge, wit, brilliant and delicious way with words. Always candid and passionate about the arts. A humanist, long overdue for another Pulitzer Prize. Auf Wiedersehen, keep in touch. ANNE LUCKERMAN Tustin
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 1996
It is with profound regret that I read that Martin Bernheimer is leaving his post at The Times. From Day 1 of his tenure I have been reading his reports on the local, national and international music scene, especially when it came to opera. He wrote with flair, style, insight, penetrating wit and sarcasm, the ingredients of being a superb music critic. His vocabulary was incisive and encyclopedic, which made me scurry more than once to the Oxford Dictionary for illumination. I remember what Kurt Herbert Adler, the late general director of the San Francisco Opera, said when asked whether he ever read a music critic's opinion.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 1996
I will miss Martin Bernheimer's criticism ("Times Critic Bernheimer to Leave After 30 Years," Feb. 15). He has frequently amused me, occasionally enraged me, often educated me . . . but never bored me. PHIL PETTY Newport Beach We are sorry that Martin Bernheimer is leaving The Times, but we realize that 30 years is a long time to be in such a demanding position. We have enjoyed his definitive reviews and commentaries (sometimes agreeing, and disagreeing at other times)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 1996 | SUSAN FREUDENHEIM, TIMES ARTS EDITOR
After more than 30 years of writing music and dance criticism for The Times, Martin Bernheimer is leaving to pursue other projects. Among his many distinctions, Bernheimer, 59, won a Pulitzer Prize for criticism in 1981, and he is a regular lecturer and quiz panelist on the Metropolitan Opera radio broadcasts. He has also taught criticism at USC, UCLA, Cal State Northridge and CalArts.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 1996
I have just spent a month in Los Angeles and have been delighted by the insight and wit of Martin Bernheimer's music reviews. There is an interesting person behind the savvy writing, and I'm told he got a Pulitzer for it too. Alas, I am back in New York where our New York Times music reporters are bland and faceless. MARSHALL IZEN New York
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 1995
Excuuuuuuse us for watching and enjoying Pavarotti on PBS (" 'World'-Weary View of Pavarotti," Calendar, Dec. 6). We think Martin Bernheimer needs to reconcile his apparent elitist attitude and lust for self-proclaimed operatic purity and its attendant exclusivity for the immense benefit and enjoyment of the "masses," i.e., many folks like us. If he really cares about opera and its appreciation, he should applaud the interface of mediums and audiences offered...
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 1989
Patrick J. Mack's April 8 letter criticizing Martin Bernheimer's "recent forays in New York" prompts a reply. While I find many of Mr. Bernheimer's reviews rankling, I relish his integrity as a critic and his championing of grand opera. Opera here is not limited to Los Angeles. We receive it via radio and TV from New York City and elsewhere. International coverage of opera by The Times keeps me well informed and justifies my expectation of meaningful news. CHARLES A. KING Tulare
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 1994
I would like to applaud Martin Bernheimer for helping to bring to public attention a problem that the community of Los Angeles cannot seem to reconcile ("Balletic Blight Still Plagues L.A.," Oct. 16). The lack of a major ballet company in a city of this size is a travesty. With no disrespect to Omaha, how can they support a company and we cannot? Young dancers such as myself are forced to leave and find employment elsewhere. Bernheimer only touched briefly on the possible reasons for this gap in our arts triumvirate.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 1994
Martin Bernheimer seems to find Leonard Bernstein's close-to-40-year romance with communism sort of, well . . . cute ("Lenny the Red Menace," Aug. 21). He writes, of Bernstein: "A possible Commie. Yikes." Communism a laugh ? Who knew? But let's get serious here. Forget 73 years of murdering, enslaving, ignoring human rights, even threatening to "bury" us, and cut to what Bernheimer believes is the real horror: that under the direction of four decades of attorneys general, the FBI was ordered to keep track of Bernstein's activities.
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