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Martin Buser

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SPORTS
March 9, 1993 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Reigning champion Martin Buser continued to lead after the third day of the Iditarod rail Sled Dog Race, officials said.
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SPORTS
March 10, 2013 | By Dan Loumena
The 2013 Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race has a new leader in the event's 2004 champion, Mitch Seavey, who overtook Aliy Zirkle as lead musher Sunday. The 1,000-mile race through Alaska is now in its final 240-mile stretch, which will follow the Bering Sea's frozen coastline to the finish in Nome. Seavey leads Aaron Burmeister, who pulled into the latest checkpoint in Unalakleet in second place. Zirkle, who is trying to become the third woman to win the endurance contest, is third while four-time champion Martin Buser, who led much of the race since the start last Sunday, is fourth.
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SPORTS
March 9, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Martin Buser, who finished second in last year's Iditarod dogsled race, was first Sunday to reach Unalakleet, Alaska, 890 miles into the 1,159-mile race from Anchorage to Nome.
SPORTS
March 5, 2013 | By Houston Mitchell
The Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race began on Sunday in Alaska, with 65 teams making their way through punishing wilderness toward the finish line in Nome on Alaska's western coast 1,000 miles away. Among the competitors were defending champion Dallas Seavey and four-time winners Lance Mackey, Jeff King and Martin Buser. “I love running the dogs, working with the dogs,” said Cindy Gallea, of Wykoff, Minn., whose best finish  among 10 Iditarods was 33rd. “I love being in Alaska, being around the beauty.” PHOTOS: Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race The Iditarod winner gets a new truck and $50,400.
SPORTS
March 10, 2013 | By Dan Loumena
The 2013 Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race has a new leader in the event's 2004 champion, Mitch Seavey, who overtook Aliy Zirkle as lead musher Sunday. The 1,000-mile race through Alaska is now in its final 240-mile stretch, which will follow the Bering Sea's frozen coastline to the finish in Nome. Seavey leads Aaron Burmeister, who pulled into the latest checkpoint in Unalakleet in second place. Zirkle, who is trying to become the third woman to win the endurance contest, is third while four-time champion Martin Buser, who led much of the race since the start last Sunday, is fourth.
SPORTS
March 5, 2013 | By Houston Mitchell
The Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race began on Sunday in Alaska, with 65 teams making their way through punishing wilderness toward the finish line in Nome on Alaska's western coast 1,000 miles away. Among the competitors were defending champion Dallas Seavey and four-time winners Lance Mackey, Jeff King and Martin Buser. “I love running the dogs, working with the dogs,” said Cindy Gallea, of Wykoff, Minn., whose best finish  among 10 Iditarods was 33rd. “I love being in Alaska, being around the beauty.” PHOTOS: Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race The Iditarod winner gets a new truck and $50,400.
SPORTS
February 17, 1993 | RICH ROBERTS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In nine years of mushing the Iditarod trail, Martin Buser has seen it all. And then some. Once he saw a freight train parked along the trail. A friend started grabbing his dogs, tying them up and throwing them into a box car. Only thing is, there isn't a railroad within miles of the trail. And Buser's friend was nowhere near that remote area. The long, dark, cold and lonely hours take their toll. Eyes blurred by days of subfreezing wind see trees move and faces lurking in the shadows.
SPORTS
March 11, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Martin Buser, a Swiss native living in Willow, Alaska, held the lead going into the final stretch of the Iditarod Trail sled dog race from Anchorage to Nome.
SPORTS
March 13, 1993 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Six days after the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race started, seven teams have emerged as clear leaders in the 1,161-mile event. Defending champion and race record-holder Martin Buser held the slim lead at Shageluk, the 15th of 27 checkpoints in the race to Nome. Behind Buser was Jeff King. Next were Rick Swenson, Susan Butcher, DeeDee Jonrowe, Rick Mackey and Tim Osmar.
SPORTS
February 17, 1993 | RICH ROBERTS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In nine years of mushing the Iditarod trail, Martin Buser has seen it all. And then some. Once he saw a freight train parked along the trail. A friend started grabbing his dogs, tying them up and throwing them into a box car. Only thing is, there isn't a railroad within miles of the trail. And Buser's friend was nowhere near that remote area. The long, dark, cold and lonely hours take their toll. Eyes blurred by days of subfreezing wind see trees move and faces lurking in the shadows.
SPORTS
March 10, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Swiss-born Martin Buser appeared headed for a record finish in the Iditarod sled dog race from Anchorage to Nome, Alaska, arriving at the Koyuk checkpoint, 988 miles into the 1,159-mile race, hours ahead of his nearest challengers.
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