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ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2013 | By Susan King
Academy Award-winning actor Martin Landau will receive the 2013 Israel Film Festival's Career Achievement Award at the 27th opening night gala April 18 at the Writers Guild Theater in Beverly Hills. Past recipients of the honor include Richard Dreyfuss and Bob Balaban. "The Israel Film Festival is delighted to honor Academy Award winner Martin Landau," festival founder and executive director Meir Fenigstein said in a statement issued Tuesday. "He is one of the longest working, most highly regarded actors in the industry.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2013 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
There was the spectacle, the runaway budget, the fights with the studio. But almost everyone thinks about the 1963 movie "Cleopatra" for one thing: Liz and Dick. Martin Landau remembers the day when he realized "Cleopatra" stars Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton were having an adulterous affair during the troubled production in Rome of Joseph L. Mankiewicz's 243-minute epic. "There were days when we literally had 10,000 extras," recalled Landau, who played Rufio, the loyal right-hand man to Julius Caesar (Rex Harrison)
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 1998 | Steve Hochman
In "Rounders," Martin Landau plays poker hustler Matt Damon's professor-mentor, mirroring his real-life role with young film talent. Landau's turn as Bela Lugosi in 1994's "Ed Wood" earned him a supporting actor Oscar and friendships with Johnny Depp and Tim Burton. Landau, 64, also teaches at the Actors' Studio West; his students have included Jack Nicholson and Oliver Stone. CAREERIST: "I'm certainly not going to play any of Matt Damon's roles in the future.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2013 | By Susan King
Academy Award-winning actor Martin Landau will receive the 2013 Israel Film Festival's Career Achievement Award at the 27th opening night gala April 18 at the Writers Guild Theater in Beverly Hills. Past recipients of the honor include Richard Dreyfuss and Bob Balaban. "The Israel Film Festival is delighted to honor Academy Award winner Martin Landau," festival founder and executive director Meir Fenigstein said in a statement issued Tuesday. "He is one of the longest working, most highly regarded actors in the industry.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 1989 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
For the actor, a successful television series can become a golden trap. The more successful the series, the more golden and the more inescapable the trap is apt to be. One of the rewarding surprises of Francis Coppola's "Tucker" was the presence of Martin Landau--for all those seasons a super-spy on "Mission: Impossible"--playing an emigre financier named Abe Karatz. Landau's hair had been grayed, he wore a slightly sinister mustache, his height and his whole aspect seemed diminished.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 1990 | TIMOTHY MANGAN
Mediocre orchestras are among the more harmless things in life, it would seem, unless one finds oneself in the presence of such a phenomenon for more than a few minutes. The Glendale Symphony is such an orchestra, and Sunday night at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion its music director, Lalo Schifrin, compounded its middling qualities by choosing a program that would challenge far more accomplished ensembles.
NEWS
March 29, 1992 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gone are the days when Martin Landau's estimable talent was being wasted in such movies as "The Harlem Globetrotters on Gilligan's Island." Landau, who made his film debut as a cool baddie in Alfred Hitchcock's "North by Northwest," said he has been "getting better choices" since receiving back-to-back best supporting Oscar nominations in 1988 and '89 for "Tucker: The Man and His Dream" and Woody Allen's "Crimes & Misdemeanors."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 1995 | Peter Green, Peter Green is a free-lance writer based in Prague. and
"Watch the nose, watch the nose!" Delicately balanced by three personal assistants, the star of director Steve Barron's new fantasy film enters Stage 2 at Barrandov Studio. Or, at least, the star's head does. At the end of an eight-foot-long, wood-grained, carbon-fiber nose is a latex head the size of a slo-pitch softball, with two blue eyes as big as silver-dollar pancakes.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 1994 | David Kronke, David Kronke is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Forget the buzz and speculation heralding Martin Landau's amazing portrayal of Bela Lugosi in Tim Burton's eccentric biopic, "Ed Wood." Here's the inside skinny--Landau will win the best support ing actor Oscar. No, the guys at accounting-firm-to-the-stars Price-Waterhouse haven't opened their eternally buttoned lips and, no, this isn't some prophecy from Criswell Predicts, the cheesehead soothsayer and Wood's buddy and sometime actor.
NEWS
February 23, 1997 | Kenneth Turan
Edward D. Wood Jr. was a 1950s filmmaker of such ineptitude that people who ponder extremes consider him the worst director ever. Tim Burton's black-and-white 1994 film turned out to be an entertaining and eccentric piece of business. Anchored by a full-throttle Oscar-winning performance by Martin Landau (left) as Bela Lugosi, "Ed Wood" is a fantasy for the terminally disaffected. Johnny Depp (right) is an almost holy innocent (Showtime early Thursday at 1:05 a.m.).
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 2012 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Once upon a time, before she was the ultimate screen sex symbol, before she became an icon and source material for generations of writers and artists, Marilyn Monroe was a working actress. She died 50 years ago this Sunday at the age of 36 from an overdose and in the intervening years the actual person has disappeared behind the myth of "Marilyn Monroe. " A visit to her place of rest at the Westwood Village Memorial Park offers testimony to the power of her memory. The wall of her crypt had to be replaced multiple times because of fans who made a pilgrimage there to caress, embrace and kiss it. But she was real, and to those who knew her Monroe was a devoted, if troubled, actress who took her craft seriously.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2010 | By Glenn Whipp, Special to the Los Angeles Times
There's a push-pull dynamic coursing through the late-in-life romance "Lovely, Still" that keeps the film intriguing even when it looks like it's going to sink into sentimentality. It's probably the first movie to premiere at the AARP's national convention to sport original music from indie-rock favorite Conor Oberst and a score from members of his band, Bright Eyes. And what does Oberst sing? Mostly Christmas songs, natch. Oberst's unlikely involvement comes through his friendship with fellow Omaha native Nik Fackler, who wrote and directed "Lovely Still" and shot it in his hometown.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 2010 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Martin Landau has worked with some of cinema's most accomplished filmmakers, including Alfred Hitchcock ("North by Northwest"), Francis Ford Coppola ("Tucker: The Man and His Dream"), Woody Allen ("Crimes and Misdemeanors") and Tim Burton ("Ed Wood"). But the 82-year-old Landau, who won the supporting actor Oscar for his uncanny performance as Bela Lugosi in 1994's "Ed Wood," doesn't hesitate to declare that, "I haven't been directed by anybody in 20 or 30 years. I come in with stuff about my character and I figure if they don't like it, they will tell me. If they don't tell me, I hit my marks, say my words and get the heck out. I know what my role is and how to fill that space and if they don't like what I have been doing they will say something.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2009 | Susan King
Who can forget those images -- Cary Grant on a deserted highway being chased by a crop dusting plane? Grant and Eva Marie Saint scampering over the president's noses on Mt. Rushmore as they are pursued by a group of nefarious spies? Then there's the pulsating score by Bernard Herrmann, one of the great screen composer's most evocative works. In fact, Alfred Hitchcock's romantic thriller "North by Northwest" is so viscerally entertaining, it's hard to believe the classic is celebrating its 50th anniversary.
NEWS
October 28, 2004 | Susan King
Dawn of the Dead Sarah Polley, Ving Rhames Universal, $30 You can't keep the undead down in this fast-paced, thrilling remake of the George Romero classic. It marks a more than promising feature debut for its young director, Zack Snyder, who imbues the old zombie formula with style, zest and gore aplenty. This time around, a disastrous worldwide viral outbreak causes the undead to rise and attack the living. The digital edition is as much fun as the movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 1998 | Steve Hochman
In "Rounders," Martin Landau plays poker hustler Matt Damon's professor-mentor, mirroring his real-life role with young film talent. Landau's turn as Bela Lugosi in 1994's "Ed Wood" earned him a supporting actor Oscar and friendships with Johnny Depp and Tim Burton. Landau, 64, also teaches at the Actors' Studio West; his students have included Jack Nicholson and Oliver Stone. CAREERIST: "I'm certainly not going to play any of Matt Damon's roles in the future.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 1991 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The Bleat Goes On: "Join Us!," the second in a series of benefits to raise monies for financially strapped Los Angeles Theatre Center, comes along Monday at 8 p.m. at the theater, 514 S. Spring St. The evening of comedy and music has a star-laden cast, including Jonelle Allen, Georgia Brown, Roscoe Lee Brown, Danny Glover, Ronnie Graham, Lainie Kazan, Sally Kirkland, Martin Landau, Rita Moreno, Edward James Olmos and Karen Morrow. The theater is seeking to raise $100,000 by Sept. 1.
NEWS
February 23, 1997 | Kenneth Turan
Edward D. Wood Jr. was a 1950s filmmaker of such ineptitude that people who ponder extremes consider him the worst director ever. Tim Burton's black-and-white 1994 film turned out to be an entertaining and eccentric piece of business. Anchored by a full-throttle Oscar-winning performance by Martin Landau (left) as Bela Lugosi, "Ed Wood" is a fantasy for the terminally disaffected. Johnny Depp (right) is an almost holy innocent (Showtime early Thursday at 1:05 a.m.).
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