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Martin Luther King Jr Harbor Hospital

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 2007 | Tiffany Hsu, Times Staff Writer
On the same day that the state took a step to pull the license of the troubled Martin Luther King Jr.-Harbor Hospital, the leader of the neighboring university was distancing the school from the controversial facility. In a "state of the university" address Thursday morning at the Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science, President Susan Kelly stressed the need to distinguish between the campus and the public hospital with which it was long associated.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 2007 | Charles Ornstein and Rich Connell, Times Staff Writers
California regulators moved Thursday to revoke the license of Martin Luther King Jr.-Harbor Hospital, an action that, if not reversed, would force its closure. The move, the boldest thus far by the state, follows recent findings by the federal government that patients at the public hospital are in immediate jeopardy of harm or death despite years of reform efforts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 2007 | Robert J. Lopez and Susannah Rosenblatt, Times Staff Writers
Los Angeles County supervisors expressed serious doubts Tuesday that Martin Luther King Jr.-Harbor Hospital would pass a federal inspection next month that could determine its survival as a public hospital. Board members also accused county health officials of providing misleading information about recent reform efforts at the long-troubled Willowbrook facility. "I believe the guillotine's going to fall in 11 days," Supervisor Mike Antonovich said, echoing the dismay of other board members.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 2007 | Rich Connell, Robert J. Lopez and Susannah Rosenblatt, Times Staff Writers
The reform effort at Martin Luther King Jr.-Harbor Hospital appears to be faltering, as the county backs off key promises to purge most of the staff and effectively hand control of the hospital to highly respected Harbor-UCLA Medical Center. The two pledges were cornerstones of a plan last year that persuaded regulators to hold off on pulling all federal funding, which would have effectively shut down the troubled Willowbrook hospital.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 2007 | Charles Ornstein, Times Staff Writer
Martin Luther King Jr.-Harbor Hospital's recent woes, far from being isolated examples of poor care at a reformed institution, represent a continuing pattern of entrenched failings that risk patients' lives, according to a federal report released Monday. According to a June 7 report from the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, 17 patients, among 60 whose cases were reviewed, received substandard care at the hospital. Some were as recent as last month.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 2007 | Anna Gorman, Times Staff Writer
In the 43 years before she died, Edith Isabel Rodriguez raised three children, volunteered in their classrooms, made their Halloween costumes and watched them grow up and have babies of their own. She worked odd jobs as a housecleaner and a tamale vendor, struggled with drug addiction, had several run-ins with the law and lived at various relatives' and friends' homes. But Rodriguez has received much more attention in death than in life.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 2007 | Charles Ornstein and Susannah Rosenblatt, Times Staff Writers
Six staff members at Martin Luther King Jr.-Harbor Hospital -- including a nurse and two nursing assistants -- saw or walked past a dying woman writhing on the floor of the emergency room lobby last month but did not help her, according to a report made public Friday. Their discipline: a letter outlining how they should behave in the future.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2007 | Charles Ornstein, Times Staff Writer
It might have gone down as the death of a "quasi-transient" woman with a history of abusing drugs. That's how the May 9 death of Edith Isabel Rodriguez was initially reported to the Los Angeles County coroner's office. But five weeks later, her demise has become a cause celebre, a symbol of bureaucratic indifference. It is fraught with significance not just for one struggling inner-city hospital but for political and health leaders in the Los Angeles area and perhaps beyond.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 2007 | Susannah Rosenblatt, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles County supervisors acknowledged Tuesday that they had discussed plans for the embattled Martin Luther King Jr.-Harbor Hospital in closed-door sessions, in what a good-government expert called a violation of the state's open-meeting law. The discussion, which the county's top lawyer defended, is the latest example of questions arising over the supervisors' handling of meetings about the Willowbrook hospital.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 2007 | Susannah Rosenblatt and Rich Connell, Times Staff Writers
In new signs of turmoil at Martin Luther King Jr.-Harbor Hospital, officials said Tuesday the chief medical officer had been replaced and more than 40% of licensed vocational nurses and nursing assistants recently failed initial skills tests. The disclosures came as the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors, grappling with federal findings that the hospital continues to endanger patients, bluntly discussed preparations for possible closure of the public facility.
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