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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 1998 | STEVE BERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just two days before the first anniversary of the North Hollywood bank holdup, a Los Angeles police officer who was permanently injured in the dramatic gun battle with the two robbers, sued the bandits' estates Thursday and the manufacturers of the assault weapons they used.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 1998 | STEVE BERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just two days before the first anniversary of the North Hollywood bank holdup, a Los Angeles police officer who was permanently injured in the dramatic gun battle with the two robbers, sued the bandits' estates Thursday and the manufacturers of the assault weapons they used.
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NEWS
March 1, 1997
Most of the 10 officers wounded in the gunfight with heavily armed bank robbers in North Hollywood escaped serious injury. Eight were treated and released and two were still hospitalized Friday night, police said. The most seriously injured was Officer Martin Whitfield, 29, of the Van Nuys station, who underwent surgery for a broken right leg, glass in his chest and shrapnel in his left side, arm and chest. Whitfield has been an officer for six years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2000 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A former police officer who was seriously wounded in the North Hollywood bank robbery shootout testified Friday that rescuers were unable to reach him for at least half an hour because of persistent gunfire. "I was thinking about dying," said Martin Whitfield, who walks with a limp as a result of his injuries. "I was shot four times, and nobody was coming to rescue me. All I could hear was the automatic gunfire."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2000 | From The Associated Press
The state Supreme Court has agreed to review a lawsuit filed against a gun maker by a police officer wounded in the 1997 North Hollywood shootout. The lawsuit by former officer Martin Whitfield claims negligence by Heckler & Koch Inc., which made the gun used by assailant Emil Matasareanu, attorney John P. McNicholas said Monday. Matasareanu and Larry Eugene Phillips Jr. robbed a Bank of America and then died in one of the most dramatic shootouts in city history.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1995 | ERROL A. COCKFIELD JR., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Patrol officers from four Los Angeles police divisions began their first three-day, 12-hour workweek Sunday as part of an experiment that officials hope will boost morale and decrease burnout. The new schedule--unlike the usual five-day, eight-hour-a-day week--will cut department costs, decrease commuting hours, allow officers more time with their families and, they hope, curb burnout. "It's a morale booster. . . . It makes for happier employees, which makes for better service," said LAPD Capt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1998 | CLAIRE VITUCCI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than a year after the North Hollywood shootout in February 1997 left two robbers dead and 11 police officers hurt, the most seriously wounded officers--Martin Whitfield and Stuart Guy--are too injured to work but are without pensions or other police in comes. Since their Injured On Duty pay, which lasts a year, ran out last month, the officers have been living on $465 a week in state workers' compensation payments.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1995 | ERROL A. COCKFIELD Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Patrol officers from four Los Angeles Police Department divisions, including one in the San Fernando Valley, began their first three-day, 36-hour workweek on Sunday as part of an experiment that officials hope will boost morale and decrease attrition rates. Under the yearlong program, officers at the Van Nuys, Rampart, Wilshire and Harbor divisions will take the new 12-hour shifts while detectives work four 10-hour days.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1998
Re "Suit Tarnishes Anniversary of Bank Shootout," Feb. 28. I object to [Stephen] Yagman's verbal assault on the LAPD. Anyone can sue anybody for anything. Have at it, Mr. Yagman. But the final court of appeals will be the people. On that infamous day, the people witnessed the truth. That truth is that every LAPD employee who wears a badge or is connected with a badge deserves to be called a hero. Civilians who put their lives on the line should be called heroes, too. You, Mr. Yagman, seeking notoriety and money, are playing to the few who take advantage of a wounded legal system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1997 | SCOTT HARRIS
Nothing, we are told, is new under the sun. But if there is a correlation between sunshine and not-newness, then this must be especially true in sunny, cliche-hardened Southern California. Here in the city that made Jack Webb say, "This is the city," the televising of true crime long ago eclipsed make- believe as a source of . . . well, not entertainment exactly, but certainly dreadful fascination. The helicopter video you have just seen is true.
NEWS
August 28, 1997 | BETH SHUSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles Police Officer Martin Whitfield knows what he will do today to mark the six-month anniversary of the North Hollywood bank shootout. It happens on the 28th day of every month--ever since four bullets tore into his body during the 40-minute gunfight. He will keep a close eye on the clock, reliving his movements of that morning, recalling the pain and, at times, rejoicing in his survival. "My heart will jump and I will remember all the feelings," Whitfield said.
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