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Martyn Hopper

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1987
Before passing Rep. Pat Schroeder's (D-Colo.) Family and Medical Leave Act, Congress should take a close look at the European experience with this high-cost mandated benefit. There, mandated family-leave laws have forced business owners to hire women of child-bearing age in part-time rather than full-time positions to avoid paying this costly benefit. In the five industrialized European countries that require paid or partially paid leave for mothers, between 1973 and 1983, growth in full-time employment of women was flat or negative while part-time employment for women increased dramatically (more than 104% in France alone)
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1988
In response to your editorial on the minimum wage ("A Decent Wage," April 27): Raising the minimum wage will do little, if anything, to help the average working man support his family with dignity. The majority of people earning the minimum wage are not heads of households. Most are secondary workers and one-third are teen-agers, according to Census Bureau figures. Many others are in the restaurant business where a substantial portion of their income is gained from tips, not hourly wages.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1988
In response to your editorial on the minimum wage ("A Decent Wage," April 27): Raising the minimum wage will do little, if anything, to help the average working man support his family with dignity. The majority of people earning the minimum wage are not heads of households. Most are secondary workers and one-third are teen-agers, according to Census Bureau figures. Many others are in the restaurant business where a substantial portion of their income is gained from tips, not hourly wages.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1987
Before passing Rep. Pat Schroeder's (D-Colo.) Family and Medical Leave Act, Congress should take a close look at the European experience with this high-cost mandated benefit. There, mandated family-leave laws have forced business owners to hire women of child-bearing age in part-time rather than full-time positions to avoid paying this costly benefit. In the five industrialized European countries that require paid or partially paid leave for mothers, between 1973 and 1983, growth in full-time employment of women was flat or negative while part-time employment for women increased dramatically (more than 104% in France alone)
BUSINESS
May 27, 2004 | Marc Lifsher, Times Staff Writer
Woodland Hills-based Zenith National Insurance Corp. said Wednesday that it would cut premiums on its workers' compensation policies by 10% this year, reflecting expected savings from the recent overhaul of the state's system for treating injured workers. The rate cuts, just submitted to the state Department of Insurance, are "a measured and gradualistic response" to the overhaul bill signed by Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger on April 19, Zenith President Stanley Zax said in a statement.
BUSINESS
September 29, 2006 | Marc Lifsher, Times Staff Writer
Insurance Commissioner John Garamendi said Thursday that he expected to recommend that insurance companies cut workers' compensation premiums by an additional 6.3% in January. The proposed cut would be the latest in a series of premium reductions after a 2004 legislative overhaul that stripped billions of dollars from the cost of the state's program for helping injured workers.
BUSINESS
August 28, 2005
Before anyone gets carried away over "Stronger Rules Sought on Association Health Plans" (Aug. 17), let me advise them to consult with the people at the epicenter of the healthcare crisis and not some self-appointed consumer group in Santa Monica. The healthcare crisis in America begins with Main Street small businesses. Only 41% of firms with between one and nine employees offer health benefits, compared with 99% of large firms that do, according to studies by the NFIB Research Foundation and the Kaiser Family Foundation.
BUSINESS
December 17, 2002 | Marla Dickerson, Times Staff Writer
For the first time in seven years, most businesses in California will pay more in unemployment insurance premiums in 2003 as the state's weak economy has put a strain on the employer-funded program that offers benefits to jobless workers.
BUSINESS
August 20, 2004 | Marc Lifsher, Times Staff Writer
The state Senate on Thursday approved a two-step hike in the hourly minimum wage that would boost it to $7.75, the highest in the nation. The bill, which passed on a party-line vote in the Democratic-controlled Senate, is expected to win an easy final tally in the Assembly before going to Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger next week. A Schwarzenegger spokeswoman said he hadn't taken a position on the measure. Business lobbyists said they were counting on the governor to kill the increase.
NEWS
October 24, 1991 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The president of a Los Angeles-based health care foundation has taken the first step toward placing an initiative on the 1992 state ballot that would direct the Legislature and the governor to adopt a program providing health insurance for all Californians.
NEWS
July 13, 1989 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, Times Staff Writer
Despite warnings that small businesses would be hurt, a Senate committee passed legislation Wednesday to require most California companies to provide health insurance for their employees. The measure by Assembly Speaker Willie Brown (D-San Francisco), which has already cleared the Assembly, would make insurance available for 2.7 million California workers who now pay for their own health care or rely on taxpayers to pick up the bill.
NEWS
January 26, 1989 | VIRGINIA ELLIS, Times Staff Writer
Assembly Speaker Willie Brown, hoping for a dramatic reduction in the number of Californians without medical insurance, introduced legislation Wednesday that would require employers with five or more employees to provide basic health-care coverage. Brown, a San Francisco Democrat who has been seeking to blunt criticism that he is more interested in politics than in policy, predicted that his proposal would provide health-care coverage for about 2.5 million workers and half a million dependents.
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