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Mary Flagler Bingham

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NEWS
July 21, 1987 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, Times Staff Writer
Macmillan Publishing Co. will announce today that it is canceling publication of "The Binghams of Louisville," the biography of the Kentucky newspaper dynasty that contains startling theories about the mysterious death of heiress Mary Flagler Bingham that provided the family with its fortune.
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NEWS
July 21, 1987 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, Times Staff Writer
Macmillan Publishing Co. will announce today that it is canceling publication of "The Binghams of Louisville," the biography of the Kentucky newspaper dynasty that contains startling theories about the mysterious death of heiress Mary Flagler Bingham that provided the family with its fortune.
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NEWS
July 3, 1987 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, Times Staff Writer
The news accounts, now 70 years old, offer only fragments of the "ghastly drama" that surrounded the marriage of Mary Kenan Flagler Bingham, "the richest woman in America." She was the widow of Standard Oil co-founder Henry Flagler and her estate was worth between $60 million and $100 million. Her bridegroom was Judge Robert Worth Bingham, a Kentucky lawyer without independent means. Their wedding in 1916 made headlines, even in New York. And so did her mysterious death eight months later.
NEWS
December 4, 1987 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, Times Staff Writer
Crown Publishers next week will publish a book that contains startling theories about the powerful Bingham family of Louisville, Ky. Earlier this year Macmillan Publishing Co. dropped the book project after challenges by the family. The book, "The Binghams of Louisville: The Dark History Behind One of America's Great Fortunes," theorizes that family patriarch Robert Worth Bingham founded the family fortune in 1917 when he "murdered his second wife for money," according to a statement by Crown.
NEWS
February 1, 1989 | GARRY ABRAMS, Times Staff Writer
When she was growing up on a secluded estate in Louisville, Sallie Bingham felt the presence of "this lurking something" in the Big House, the family name for the grim mansion on the Ohio River that housed her aristocratic tribe. When she went back last year for the funeral of her father, newspaper publisher Barry Bingham Sr., she felt it again, she said. "It's still there . . . the hovering presence of something unexplained that has malevolence."
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