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Mary Melton

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MAGAZINE
October 20, 1996
Regarding "If It Doesn't Move, Grill It!" (by Mary Melton, Sept. 15): Peas porridge hot Peas porridge cold Peas porridge on the grill Leaves me cold! Harron Kelner Chatsworth
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2011 | James Rainey
One editor from Los Angeles Magazine's salad days, in the 1980s, recalls a publication full of "a lot of fluff and nonsense and fun," with some serious journalism squeezed in between. That formula had been turned slightly on its head in the first years of the new millennium, as L.A.'s namesake magazine leaned toward earnest storytelling, with service features occasionally feeling tacked on. Los Angeles celebrated its 50th anniversary this month, with a smaller staff and fewer pages than the fat, happy days when the likes of Farrah Fawcett and Orson Welles graced its cover and revenue was so abundant that some advertisers could be turned away.
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MAGAZINE
April 16, 2000
As an aerospace executive during the heyday of big pictures and defense projects, I had occasional contact with the major movie studios. One of the highlights at MGM was a stop at the studio barbershop for a visit with Beatrice Kaye and Ila Hirsch ("A True Movie Buff," by Mary Melton, So SoCal, March 26). They are both class people whose contributions deserve recognition. Thanks for an update on these two lovely ladies. H. Smith Jackson Culver City
MAGAZINE
April 16, 2000
As an aerospace executive during the heyday of big pictures and defense projects, I had occasional contact with the major movie studios. One of the highlights at MGM was a stop at the studio barbershop for a visit with Beatrice Kaye and Ila Hirsch ("A True Movie Buff," by Mary Melton, So SoCal, March 26). They are both class people whose contributions deserve recognition. Thanks for an update on these two lovely ladies. H. Smith Jackson Culver City
MAGAZINE
February 16, 1997
In the Los Feliz of the 1950s, one of our family's favorite outings was a ride to the entrance of Griffith Park, where we'd watch our "mountain fountain" erupt into a rainbow of colors ("The Fountainhead," by Mary Melton, So SoCal, Dec. 22). We'd try to guess which color would be at the top when the fountain reached its peak. Thanks for the item about this landmark. H. W. Gesas Encino
MAGAZINE
November 24, 1996
While I appreciate human interest features highlighting the behind the scenes lives of city employees ("The Reluctant Gourmet," by Mary Melton, So SoCal, Oct. 13), I was taken aback by your use of the hoary and glaring term firemen throughout the article. Melton may not have observed any female firefighters at Station No. 60 in North Hollywood, but there are plenty of them, not only here but all around the country. Isn't it time that the media embraced both the 21st century and the notion of inclusive language?
MAGAZINE
May 17, 1998
In "Surviving the Rites of Passover" (SoCal Style, Entertaining, by Mary Melton, April 5), Melton refers to herself as a shiksa--a pejorative on the level of the "n" word. Ann Bien Anaheim Editor's note: Rabbi Laura Geller of Temple Emanuel in Beverly Hills says "shiksa" has a strongly negative connotation, coming from the Hebrew for "abomination," but that it has entered the popular lexicon: "You're saying you're from a different background and putting yourself down in a certain way."
MAGAZINE
August 25, 1996
I read with interest the piece on the painting of the Hollywood sign ("Give Him an 'H,' " by Mary Melton, So SoCal, July 14). I am 75 years old, and I remember a story that appeared in several movie magazines about an actress, Peg Entwistle, who jumped from the crossbar of the letter H in 1932. I'd appreciate reading or hearing more about it. Marjorie Cox Whittier Editor's note: We'll see what we can do.
MAGAZINE
November 30, 1997
I heard an amazing story about the origin of the phrase "left coast" at a BBQ in Orlando with a group of Disney executives ("Hard to Port," by Mary Melton, So SoCal, Oct. 5). Disney executives transplanted to culturally harsh Florida to start up Walt Disney World befriended similarly exiled New York real estate executives. At cocktail parties, Disney folks talked about their trips home to the West Coast while the developers talked about their projects on the west coast of Florida. The resulting confusion was ended when the Disney people started referring to home as the "left coast."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2011 | James Rainey
One editor from Los Angeles Magazine's salad days, in the 1980s, recalls a publication full of "a lot of fluff and nonsense and fun," with some serious journalism squeezed in between. That formula had been turned slightly on its head in the first years of the new millennium, as L.A.'s namesake magazine leaned toward earnest storytelling, with service features occasionally feeling tacked on. Los Angeles celebrated its 50th anniversary this month, with a smaller staff and fewer pages than the fat, happy days when the likes of Farrah Fawcett and Orson Welles graced its cover and revenue was so abundant that some advertisers could be turned away.
MAGAZINE
May 17, 1998
In "Surviving the Rites of Passover" (SoCal Style, Entertaining, by Mary Melton, April 5), Melton refers to herself as a shiksa--a pejorative on the level of the "n" word. Ann Bien Anaheim Editor's note: Rabbi Laura Geller of Temple Emanuel in Beverly Hills says "shiksa" has a strongly negative connotation, coming from the Hebrew for "abomination," but that it has entered the popular lexicon: "You're saying you're from a different background and putting yourself down in a certain way."
MAGAZINE
November 30, 1997
I heard an amazing story about the origin of the phrase "left coast" at a BBQ in Orlando with a group of Disney executives ("Hard to Port," by Mary Melton, So SoCal, Oct. 5). Disney executives transplanted to culturally harsh Florida to start up Walt Disney World befriended similarly exiled New York real estate executives. At cocktail parties, Disney folks talked about their trips home to the West Coast while the developers talked about their projects on the west coast of Florida. The resulting confusion was ended when the Disney people started referring to home as the "left coast."
MAGAZINE
February 16, 1997
In the Los Feliz of the 1950s, one of our family's favorite outings was a ride to the entrance of Griffith Park, where we'd watch our "mountain fountain" erupt into a rainbow of colors ("The Fountainhead," by Mary Melton, So SoCal, Dec. 22). We'd try to guess which color would be at the top when the fountain reached its peak. Thanks for the item about this landmark. H. W. Gesas Encino
MAGAZINE
November 24, 1996
While I appreciate human interest features highlighting the behind the scenes lives of city employees ("The Reluctant Gourmet," by Mary Melton, So SoCal, Oct. 13), I was taken aback by your use of the hoary and glaring term firemen throughout the article. Melton may not have observed any female firefighters at Station No. 60 in North Hollywood, but there are plenty of them, not only here but all around the country. Isn't it time that the media embraced both the 21st century and the notion of inclusive language?
MAGAZINE
October 20, 1996
Regarding "If It Doesn't Move, Grill It!" (by Mary Melton, Sept. 15): Peas porridge hot Peas porridge cold Peas porridge on the grill Leaves me cold! Harron Kelner Chatsworth
MAGAZINE
August 25, 1996
I read with interest the piece on the painting of the Hollywood sign ("Give Him an 'H,' " by Mary Melton, So SoCal, July 14). I am 75 years old, and I remember a story that appeared in several movie magazines about an actress, Peg Entwistle, who jumped from the crossbar of the letter H in 1932. I'd appreciate reading or hearing more about it. Marjorie Cox Whittier Editor's note: We'll see what we can do.
MAGAZINE
July 18, 1999
In a sidebar to the article "Behold the Obi-Wan Undies" (by Mary Melton, June 13), you depict a number of endangered items that might become future collectibles. In the case of one, it appears that the name has become extinct before the machine. The gadget you call the "foot measure" (and shouldn't it have been "foot measurer"?) is, in fact, a Brannock Device. It was invented and patented by Charles Brannock in the late 1920s. Now if you'll excuse me, I have to go resurface an ice rink on my ice-smoothing riding thing.
MAGAZINE
February 9, 1997
Let the Marlboro Man head down Route 66 to a sane place, like the Mojave Desert, where he can light up and take a long, unrestricted drag--and I hope Joe Camel goes with him ("Endangered Man," by Mary Melton, So SoCal, Dec. 15). At least there, in open country, they won't have us inhaling their smoke or listening to their hacking coughs. There they can suffer and die in peace. Then, perhaps, the rest of us, including our children, will have a chance to live our lives more safely. Patricia Batatian San Marino I don't smoke, but the Marlboro Man stays.
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