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Mary Roach

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 2003 | Roy Rivenburg, Times Staff Writer
It's a rare talent that can make people want to throw up and laugh at the same time. Mary Roach is sprawled out on an embalming table, chattering about the unusual career opportunities available to dead people: human crash-test dummy, bulletproof vest guinea pig, plastic-injected art exhibit and Swedish tree compost. "Death. It doesn't have to be boring," she writes in "Stiff: The Curious Lives of Human Cadavers," her first book.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2010 | Alie Ward
When Mary Roach describes her writing process, she is nothing if not self-deprecating. "I always know that there will be three or four months of utter confusion and no sense of what the book will be," she admits. "Usually there's a period of low-grade panic, of sad flailing. " The 51-year old author started her writing career as a copy editor and publicist before penning her first freelance column for the San Francisco Examiner. With her 2003 debut book "Stiff: The Curious Lives of Human Cadavers," she unwittingly launched a bestselling series of hybrid humor/science books that includes "Spook: Science Tackles the Afterlife" and "Bonk: The Curious Coupling of Science and Sex. " Speaking via phone from her home in Oakland, she recounts her expectations for "Stiff": "I thought it was a one-off for sure.
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BOOKS
April 20, 2008 | Tara Ison, Tara Ison is the author, most recently, of "The List."
What Mary Roach won't do for a book! In her delicious "Stiff: The Curious Lives of Human Cadavers," Roach hung out with severed heads in a dissection lab, sniffed around a body farm (more politely known as a forensic anthropology facility) and studied smashed corpses donated for automobile-crash research -- all to aid her investigation of an aspect of existence most of us prefer to ignore.
BOOKS
April 20, 2008 | Tara Ison, Tara Ison is the author, most recently, of "The List."
What Mary Roach won't do for a book! In her delicious "Stiff: The Curious Lives of Human Cadavers," Roach hung out with severed heads in a dissection lab, sniffed around a body farm (more politely known as a forensic anthropology facility) and studied smashed corpses donated for automobile-crash research -- all to aid her investigation of an aspect of existence most of us prefer to ignore.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2010 | Alie Ward
When Mary Roach describes her writing process, she is nothing if not self-deprecating. "I always know that there will be three or four months of utter confusion and no sense of what the book will be," she admits. "Usually there's a period of low-grade panic, of sad flailing. " The 51-year old author started her writing career as a copy editor and publicist before penning her first freelance column for the San Francisco Examiner. With her 2003 debut book "Stiff: The Curious Lives of Human Cadavers," she unwittingly launched a bestselling series of hybrid humor/science books that includes "Spook: Science Tackles the Afterlife" and "Bonk: The Curious Coupling of Science and Sex. " Speaking via phone from her home in Oakland, she recounts her expectations for "Stiff": "I thought it was a one-off for sure.
OPINION
June 18, 2004
Re "Putting a Good Face on the Final Adieu," Commentary, June 13: Mary Roach presents an interesting perspective on embalming and closed-casket viewing. Is the corpse really there or not, and is it the right corpse? When viewing the open casket of Lenin in Red Square 10 years ago, she found that his embalmed body looked great. Alas, when I took the same tour at about the same time, the general opinion was that Lenin, who died in 1924, could never be so perfectly preserved and that his corpse is wax. Iris McKinley Redondo Beach
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2010
POP MUSIC Lady Gaga In the humble beginnings of her music career, Lady Gaga penned tunes for artists such as the Pussycat Dolls. Now her electro- pop songs have made her into one of the biggest, most infamous pop stars of late. Her show is sure to deliver plenty of theatrics, disco balladry, and avant-garde costumes. Staples Center, 1111 S Figueroa St., L.A. $51.25. http://www.staplescenter.com . Vans Warped Tour Now in its 16th year, this traveling punk-rock show is catching up in age to its young-leaning audience.
NEWS
June 19, 2012 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times / For Booster Shots
Conflicting reports surfaced Tuesday on the state of Hosni Mubarak after the former Egyptian president was said to have suffered a stroke in prison. The state-run news agency MENA said that the 84-year-old Mubarak had suffered clinical death, but other reports say Mubarak was still on a respirator and not clinically dead,  according to state and independent news media . To add to the confusion, clinical death doesn't necessarily mean total death. "Clinical death" is a medical term meaning that breathing has ceased and the heart has stopped pumping blood around the body, but, for at least a short while, the brain is still alive.
BOOKS
June 6, 2004
*--* SO. CAL. RATING Fiction *--* *--* 1 Angels & Demons by Dan Brown (Pocket Books: $7.99) A Harvard scholar uncovers a vendetta against the Catholic Church. 2 Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark Haddon (Vintage: $12) An autistic teen seeks a killer. 3 The Devil Wears Prada by Lauren Weisberger (Broadway: $13.95) A college grad enters fashion publishing. 4 The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold (Back Bay: $13.95) A murdered girl tells the story of those left behind.
BOOKS
April 27, 2008
Rankings are based on a Times poll of Southland bookstores. *--* -- Fiction weeks on list 1. Unaccustomed Earth by Jhumpa Lahiri (Knopf: $25) 3 Stories of American-born children and their Bengali parents straddling cultures. 2. Hollywood Crows by Joseph Wambaugh (Little, 3 Brown: $26.99) Two cops become ensnared in a femme fatale's nasty divorce. 3.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 2003 | Roy Rivenburg, Times Staff Writer
It's a rare talent that can make people want to throw up and laugh at the same time. Mary Roach is sprawled out on an embalming table, chattering about the unusual career opportunities available to dead people: human crash-test dummy, bulletproof vest guinea pig, plastic-injected art exhibit and Swedish tree compost. "Death. It doesn't have to be boring," she writes in "Stiff: The Curious Lives of Human Cadavers," her first book.
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