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NEWS
March 8, 1994 | Associated Press
William E. Brock III, a former senator and congressman from Tennessee, announced his candidacy Monday to become the first senator in 115 years to win election from two states. Brock, 63, has been running an unannounced campaign for months for Maryland's Republican nomination to challenge three-term Democratic Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 29, 1998 | ALAN C. MILLER and LISA GETTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As a get-out-the-vote event, President Clinton's nationally televised appearance at a Baltimore church on the eve of the November elections was deemed a great success: It helped Democrats in Maryland and across the country fare better than expected at the ballot box. But the gathering, which included Clinton urging the more than 2,000 African American parishioners to vote, has left considerable controversy in its wake.
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NEWS
November 9, 1988
Maryland's gun-control law aimed at "Saturday night specials" easily won approval from voters, George Bush narrowly beat Michael S. Dukakis in the presidential race and Democratic Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes overwhelmingly won a third term. In the race for Maryland's 10 electoral votes, Bush had 798,541 votes, or 51%, and Dukakis had 776,547, or 49% with 98% of the precincts reporting.
NEWS
April 17, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
State legislator Elijah Cummings handily won a special congressional election to fill the vacated seat of former Democratic Rep. Kweisi Mfume, who resigned to become president of the NAACP. Cummings, a Democrat, rolled over his Republican opponent, Kenneth Kondner, with 81% of the vote in Maryland's 7th Congressional District, which encompasses parts of Baltimore and vicinity and is overwhelmingly Democratic.
NEWS
October 25, 1987 | United Press International
Vice President George Bush captured 60% of the vote Saturday in a straw poll of Maryland Republicans, winning by a 4-1 margin over the second-place finisher, Kansas Sen. Bob Dole. At their annual convention, Maryland Republicans cast 643 votes for Bush, 164 for Dole and 68 for New York Rep. Jack Kemp. Former television evangelist Pat Robertson received 42 votes, former Secretary of State Alexander M. Haig Jr. had three and former Delaware Gov. Pierre S. (Pete) du Pont IV had one vote. Former U.
NEWS
September 14, 1994 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a startling political comeback that could have national repercussions, Marion Barry on Tuesday overcame a highly publicized conviction and imprisonment for smoking crack cocaine to win the Democratic nomination for mayor. Barry, who mobilized younger and poorer black voters around his theme of redemption, defeated City Councilman John Ray and the incumbent mayor, Sharon Pratt Kelly, in a hard-fought race.
NEWS
November 23, 1994 | The Washington Post
Democrat Parris N. Glendening emerged as the winner of the Maryland governor's race Tuesday after an official review of the ballots put him ahead by 6,007 votes. But his GOP opponent, Ellen R. Sauerbrey, is claiming fraud.
NEWS
March 9, 1988 | From Associated Press
Mississippi Democrats picked a young congressman as their candidate to replace John C. Stennis in the U.S. Senate, while Democratic Sens. Paul S. Sarbanes of Maryland and Lloyd Bentsen of Texas easily overcame little-known primary opponents Tuesday. As the first state primaries coincided with Super Tuesday, Rep. Wayne Dowdy defeated Secretary of State Dick Molpus for the Democratic nomination in Mississippi. He is expected to face a tough fight from Rep.
NEWS
March 5, 1992 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The defeat of a conservative Democratic incumbent in Tuesday's Maryland primary may bring the same message to Capitol Hill that George Bush has been receiving: Many voters are unhappy and intend to vent their displeasure when casting their ballots. The primary loss by Rep. Beverly B.
NEWS
December 28, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Seven weeks after losing the state's closest gubernatorial race in 75 years, Republican Ellen Sauerbrey asked a judge either to declare her the winner or order a new election because of what she claimed was voter fraud. In her Circuit Court suit, the former 16-year state lawmaker who lost to Democrat Parris Glendening by 5,993 votes, said volunteers had identified more than 11,000 suspected cases of fraud or illegal voting.
NEWS
August 19, 1995 | Associated Press
An FBI investigation into allegations of voter fraud in Gov. Parris Glendening's razor-thin victory over a Republican rival has turned up no evidence of widespread criminal wrongdoing, a published report said. The Baltimore Sun, quoting unidentified FBI sources, said the investigation uncovered some irregularities but no evidence of serious vote tampering or other criminal conduct alleged by Ellen R. Sauerbrey. Sauerbrey lost to Glendening by fewer than 6,000 votes.
NEWS
January 16, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Despite vowing she would never give up, Republican Ellen Sauerbrey said she is abandoning her state court challenge of the gubernatorial election she lost by about 6,000 votes. A spokeswoman refused to say why Sauerbrey was withdrawing her lawsuit from the Maryland Court of Appeals. A news conference was scheduled for today. Sauerbrey, a legislator, had claimed the election was stolen through fraud or illegal voting, mainly in Baltimore. She lost by 5,993 of 1.4 million votes cast.
NEWS
January 14, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Republican loser in Maryland's closest gubernatorial race in 75 years was denied a new election despite claims of widespread voter fraud. Circuit Judge Raymond G. Thieme in Annapolis said there was "simply no evidence of any systematic omissions or a pattern of misconduct throughout the state." Ellen Sauerbrey, a legislator who lost by 5,993 votes, had claimed the election was stolen through fraud or illegal voting. Democrat Parris Glendening was certified the winner in December.
NEWS
December 28, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Seven weeks after losing the state's closest gubernatorial race in 75 years, Republican Ellen Sauerbrey asked a judge either to declare her the winner or order a new election because of what she claimed was voter fraud. In her Circuit Court suit, the former 16-year state lawmaker who lost to Democrat Parris Glendening by 5,993 votes, said volunteers had identified more than 11,000 suspected cases of fraud or illegal voting.
NEWS
November 23, 1994 | The Washington Post
Democrat Parris N. Glendening emerged as the winner of the Maryland governor's race Tuesday after an official review of the ballots put him ahead by 6,007 votes. But his GOP opponent, Ellen R. Sauerbrey, is claiming fraud.
NEWS
November 5, 1994 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Perhaps the best evidence of New Jersey Gov. Christine Todd Whitman's emergence as a national political force came this week when she became the target of an orchestrated campaign attack by a Democratic gubernatorial candidate-- in Maryland.
NEWS
April 17, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
State legislator Elijah Cummings handily won a special congressional election to fill the vacated seat of former Democratic Rep. Kweisi Mfume, who resigned to become president of the NAACP. Cummings, a Democrat, rolled over his Republican opponent, Kenneth Kondner, with 81% of the vote in Maryland's 7th Congressional District, which encompasses parts of Baltimore and vicinity and is overwhelmingly Democratic.
NEWS
November 5, 1994 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Perhaps the best evidence of New Jersey Gov. Christine Todd Whitman's emergence as a national political force came this week when she became the target of an orchestrated campaign attack by a Democratic gubernatorial candidate-- in Maryland.
NEWS
September 14, 1994 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a startling political comeback that could have national repercussions, Marion Barry on Tuesday overcame a highly publicized conviction and imprisonment for smoking crack cocaine to win the Democratic nomination for mayor. Barry, who mobilized younger and poorer black voters around his theme of redemption, defeated City Councilman John Ray and the incumbent mayor, Sharon Pratt Kelly, in a hard-fought race.
NEWS
March 8, 1994 | Associated Press
William E. Brock III, a former senator and congressman from Tennessee, announced his candidacy Monday to become the first senator in 115 years to win election from two states. Brock, 63, has been running an unannounced campaign for months for Maryland's Republican nomination to challenge three-term Democratic Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes.
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