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April 14, 1997 | BILL KOHLHAASE
The appearance of keyboardist's Wayne Horovitz's quartet, Zony Mash, Friday at McCabe's Guitar Shop on the same night that Medeski Martin and Wood, that other organ-based combo, played the nearby Ash Grove, invited comparisons with the better-known, longer-lived organization. The verdict?
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SPORTS
October 9, 2000 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Trainer Bobby Frankel has an equine sequel to "Same Time, Next Year," the Broadway play that became a movie in 1978. Instead of Alan Alda and Ellen Burstyn, Frankel's casting starts with Mash One, a seldom-seen but drop-dead opportunist from Chile. Mash One, ridden by David Flores, won Sunday's $300,000 Clement L. Hirsch Turf Championship at Santa Anita, a victory that came a year after his last start, which had produced a win in the same stake.
SPORTS
November 24, 1992 | MIKE HISERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jim Bittner could not be consoled at the time. But on Monday, after Moorpark College accepted an invitation for a rematch against Bakersfield in the 41st annual Potato Bowl, the Raiders' coach recalled a poignant moment from the regular-season past. Minutes after Moorpark and Bakersfield completed a 10-10 tie on Oct. 17, Bittner was approached by the father of a Raider player.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 2009 | Dennis McLellan
Larry Gelbart, the award-winning comedy writer best known for developing the landmark TV series "MASH," co-writing the book for the hit Broadway musical "A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum" and co-writing the classic movie comedy "Tootsie," died this morning. He was 81. Gelbart, who was diagnosed with cancer in June, died at his home in Beverly Hills, said his wife, Pat. Jack Lemmon once described the genial, quick-witted Gelbart as "one of the greatest writers of comedy to have graced the arts in this century."
FOOD
February 3, 1994 | BETTY ROSBOTTOM
Walking past stands laden with produce at the Union Square green market in New York City recently, I came upon a crowd huddled around a chef. It was a cooking demonstration. A fellow onlooker handed me a bright-orange paper with the cook's recipes printed on it, but since I was in a hurry, I didn't look at the sheet until later that day, on the train home. Immediately an intriguing recipe for mashed potatoes, created by Lloyd Feit of Cafe Loup on West 13th Street, caught my eye.
FOOD
December 14, 1989
"My grandmother from the northern part of France used to make these Pommes Dauphine," Claudie Ces writes. "I used to watch her make them. Now, each time my husband or either of my two sons has a birthday, I make the pommes to go with a roast. Bon appetit." POMMES DAUPHINE 1 1/2 cups water 1 1/3 cups flour Salt 4 eggs Thick mashed potatoes using recipe for 3 cups instant mashed potato flakes Oil for deep frying Prepare pate a choux dough, bring water to boil in medium saucepan.
FOOD
April 24, 1986
The next time mashed potatoes are on the menu, you can prepare potato skins at the same time. Scrub the potatoes, then pierce in several places to allow the steam to escape. Bake directly on the rack (or on a baking sheet) at 400 degrees 40 to 45 minutes, or until soft when pinched with mitted hands or tested with a slim skewer or fork. Halve the potatoes lengthwise and scoop out the pulp, leaving a quarter-inch skin.
FOOD
May 17, 1990 | MAX JACOBSON
The early bird, as we know, is the wise bird. For seniors, the Early Bird dinner is a wise buy, served well before the dinner hour crush and at prices that fit a retiree's budget. Here are some restaurants that serve those Early Birds. Alouette, 7929 Santa Monica Boulevard, West Hollywood . (213) 650-6722. "Sunset Dinners" served on request only on Sundays from 5 to 6 p.m., Tuesdays through Thursdays from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m., and Fridays and Saturdays from 5:30 to 6 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 1990 | DAVID NELSON
George and Piret Munger's new eatery is called Canes, which gives a quick idea of the sort of item that George Munger, who does limp on occasion (but stoutly denies that he suffers from gout), has spent some time collecting. Canes may constitute a curious and novel motif for a restaurant, or for a "California bistro," as this place bills itself, but groupings of them hang at regular intervals on the walls, rather like coats of arms in an Old English pub.
FOOD
November 19, 1995
It's a question of consistency. Is it better to go smooth and sophisticated or lumpy and homey? Then there is the question of the proper utensil. Masher, ricer, blender or fork? It's all a matter of personal style. But we do advise using baking potatoes (also known as non-waxy, mealy or floury) rather than boiling potatoes for mashing.
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