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NEWS
June 14, 2000 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The owner of Russia's largest independent media operation was arrested here Tuesday evening, several days after an aide was warned that authorities were planning new moves against the tycoon's Media-Most company. The arrest of Vladimir A. Gusinsky, whose media outlets have not shied away from criticizing the Kremlin, sparked a wave of dismay and outrage among journalists and liberal politicians. The magnate's battle with the government came to a head just days after his right-hand man, Igor Y.
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NEWS
May 12, 2000 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just four days after President Vladimir V. Putin's inauguration, police commandos wearing ski masks and carrying automatic weapons raided Russia's largest independent media company Thursday in a move widely seen as an attempt to silence criticism of the Kremlin.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2000 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
In 1978 Robert Heinecken made two large portraits of Susan Sontag, the New York intellectual whose new book "On Photography" was causing a stir in literary and artistic circles. The pair of black-and-white portraits hangs near the entrance to the 35-year retrospective of Heinecken's work, now at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and they throw down an inescapable gauntlet.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2000 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
In today's dot-com world, when Mom-and-Pop stores have gone digital and adults regularly turn to teenagers to answer their most vexing computer queries, it's increasingly difficult to recall the time when the budding technology revolution felt just that way: revolutionary. Twenty-five years ago you could see it coming, off in the distance, if only in things like the sudden proliferation of Polaroid cameras and the arrival of portable video systems.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 1999 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
The Museum of Contemporary Art has run some radio ads for its newly opened exhibition, "Barbara Kruger," during Howard Stern's show, L.A's morning drive-time ratings powerhouse. It's an excellent fit. The shock jock is loud, graphic and in-your-face. So is Kruger's art. Stern is obsessed with subjects like sex, power, race and religion. So is Kruger. The self-proclaimed King of All Media has spread his domain from radio into publishing, movies and television.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1998 | ROBERT SCHEER, Robert Scheer is a Times contributing editor. E-mail: rscheer@aol.com
It's sick. There was no blue dress and no semen stain, but America's mass media fell for the lurid tales of two political hustlers out to humiliate the president of the United States. "The dress story?" Lucianne S. Goldberg exulted to a New York Daily News reporter. "I think I leaked that--I had to do something to get their [the media's] attention--I've done it. And I'm not unproud of it." But the media, mainstream and tabloid--in this post-O.J.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 1997 | Al Martinez
Some years ago while gathering information about the roving hookers of Sepulveda Boulevard, I got a cigar shoved in my face by a woman who hated newspapers. It was my own cigar. It happened on a side street in Van Nuys. She had complained to the police that prostitutes often conducted their business in her frontyard, smashing her prize periwinkles, and she was sick and tired of it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 1997 | ROBERT SCHEER, Robert Scheer is a Times contributing editor. E-mail: rscheer@aol.com
Have the news executives who run America's mass media gone mad? Is there any possible journalistic justification for the seemingly endless coverage of the death of Princess Diana? Nothing that this woman represented can warrant the astounding excess of attention accorded by the most respectable centers of electronic and print journalism. No pioneer of science, genius inventor, brilliant poet or head of state--short of John Kennedy--has ever received, in my recollection, such adulation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 1997 | JAMES LULL, James Lull is a professor of communication studies at San Jose State University and co-editor of "Media Scandals," to be published in October by Columbia University Press. E-mail: JasLull@email.sjsu.edu
The death of Diana, Princess of Wales, and the other passengers was an accident caused by bad decisions and bad driving, not by the celebrity photographers following her and not by her fans who eagerly consume the images they produce. Reports Monday that the limousine driver was under the influence of alcohol only make it more clear that it was persons inside the car who ultimately were responsible for what happened.
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