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Mass Murders

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NEWS
August 25, 1986 | United Press International
Stricter gun control laws would not have stopped Patrick Henry Sherrill from killing 14 co-workers in the Edmond, Okla., post office in one of the worst mass murders in U.S. history, Oklahoma County prosecutor Robert Macy said Sunday.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2014 | By Paloma Esquivel
Orange County prosecutors have ended their quest to use recorded conversations between the alleged Seal Beach mass killer and a jailhouse informant, which they had hoped could put the man on death row. Senior Deputy Dist. Atty. Howard Gundy told the court Tuesday he would concede a defense motion which argued that tapes of alleged gunman Scott Dekraai and informant Fernando Perez were obtained in violation of Dekraai's 6th amendment rights. The recordings spurred a wide-ranging defense investigation into the use of jailhouse informants in Orange County.
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NEWS
July 1, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
Excavation under the foothills bunker of survivalist Leonard Lake produced no new evidence in the mass murders apparently committed at Lake's remote Sierra Nevada home, investigators said. "There is absolutely nothing down to four feet under the floor of the bunker," Calaveras County sheriff's spokesman Jim Stenquist said Friday, after officers completed a day of digging and sifting dirt under the suspected sex and murder dungeon.
NATIONAL
March 14, 2014 | By Joseph Serna
A man who robbed and shot to death nine people, including Buddhist monks and family members, in an Arizona temple was sentenced to 239 years in prison Friday, Maricopa County court officials said. Johnathan Doody, 39, had been convicted of carrying out what remains the deadliest mass murder in Arizona history. A temple abbot, five monks, an apprentice monk, a nun and her nephew were gunned down in the Phoenix-area Wat Promkunaram temple in 1991. Doody and a friend, Alex Garcia, walked into the temple in October 1991 armed with a shotgun and rifle and robbed the templegoers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
A man accused of killing nine of his children wrote a book about his life -- a life prosecutors have argued included polygamy, incest and abuse of his children. In a letter he sent to the Fresno Bee this week, Marcus Wesson talked about the book, titled "In the Night, of the Light, for the Dark," and gave the paper permission to look into it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
FRESNO Marcus Wesson's children were shot in the face and died almost immediately, according to death certificates from the worst mass murder in Fresno history. The certificates of seven of the nine deaths were released Monday, offering more clues into what happened March 12. Wesson has been charged with nine counts of murder.
NEWS
June 18, 1985 | LOUIS SAHAGUN and MARK A. STEIN, Times Staff Writers
Acting on a tip from a 15-year-old boy who once worked on the property, authorities Monday said they will excavate several new sites in the search for bodies at the remote mountain home of suspected mass murderer Leonard Lake. Among the sites to be dug up are a six-foot pit believed to be hidden under a cinder-block bunker and two smaller areas near a dog pen and some water tanks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 2001 | MONTE MORIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mass murderer Edward Charles Allaway says he has recovered completely from schizophrenia and is ready to live a normal life. If so, mental health experts say, he is a rare exception. The vast majority of schizophrenics endure the condition throughout their lives. Schizophrenia is a mental illness marked by a withdrawal from reality, illogical patterns of thinking and delusions. It has no known cause and no known cure--and in extreme cases has provoked sufferers to sudden deadly violence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 2005 | Mark Arax, Times Staff Writer
A jury decided Wednesday that Marcus Wesson should be put to death for killing nine of his children in a cult-like murder-suicide pact in this city's worst mass murder. Jurors deliberated nine hours before deciding on the death penalty for the 58-year-old Wesson, who had been convicted June 17 on nine counts of homicide in the March 2004 shooting deaths, even though he probably did not fire the murder weapon.
NATIONAL
December 18, 2012 | By Matt Pearce
As Howard B. Unruh barricaded himself in his home against the police -- after finally running out of ammunition -- he got a call from an assistant city editor at a local newspaper who had looked up his phone number. “Why are you killing people?” asked the editor, Philip W. Buxton. “I don't know,” Unruh replied. “I can't answer that yet. I'll have to talk to you later. I'm too busy now.” It was 1949 in Camden, N.J., and Unruh had just killed 12 people and injured four others with a Luger pistol, including women and children.
WORLD
February 24, 2014 | By Sergei L. Loiko and Carol J. Williams
KIEV, Ukraine - Ukraine's acting government issued an arrest warrant for President Viktor Yanukovich on Monday and warned the international community that the country needs $35 billion in aid to avert default. Yanukovich slipped out of Kiev on Friday after signing a European Union-brokered agreement that ended bloody confrontation between police and opposition demonstrators by calling for an interim, multiparty government and early elections to replace the effectively deposed head of state.
NATIONAL
November 25, 2013 | By Tina Susman
NEW YORK - The gunman who massacred 26 people at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., was obsessed with mass murders and so mentally twisted that his mother planned to move him out of state so he could attend a special school, yet she had him living in a home with firearms and ammunition and gave him money to buy a gun for Christmas. The information was released Monday in the most detailed account yet of the Dec. 14, 2012, shooting that left 20 first-graders and six school employees dead and galvanized calls nationwide for stricter gun control.
OPINION
December 25, 2012
Re "Pressure mounts on U.S. to curtail aid to Rwanda," Dec. 21 This article casually mentions the killing of about 5 million people in Congo, many of them by rebels assisted by Rwanda, which receives U.S. aid. I was under the impression that the civilized world (which includes the U.S., although after recent events one wonders) had agreed with the Jews after World War II to adopt the motto "never again. " Now it appears to have changed to, "Well, it's OK as long as they are not white.
NATIONAL
December 18, 2012 | By Matt Pearce
As Howard B. Unruh barricaded himself in his home against the police -- after finally running out of ammunition -- he got a call from an assistant city editor at a local newspaper who had looked up his phone number. “Why are you killing people?” asked the editor, Philip W. Buxton. “I don't know,” Unruh replied. “I can't answer that yet. I'll have to talk to you later. I'm too busy now.” It was 1949 in Camden, N.J., and Unruh had just killed 12 people and injured four others with a Luger pistol, including women and children.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 2012 | By Steven Zeitchik
TORONTO--From “Hearts and Minds” to “Shoah,” documentary film has a long history of tackling difficult subjects like death and violence.  But they've never looked at it in quite the way that Joshua Oppenheimer and Christine Cynn do in “The Act Of Killing,” one of the breakout documentaries of the Toronto International Film Festival and a movie that could well change how you view the form. “Act of Killing's” subject is the purge of an estimated 500,000 suspected Communists in 1965-66 in Indonesia, a politically significant event that preceded the long reign of the controversial Suharto.
NATIONAL
September 9, 2012 | By Jenny Deam
AURORA, Colo. - It was only a few hours into a day that already felt like it would never end. On July 20, Mayor Steve Hogan suddenly was presiding over a city that had become the home of one of the country's worst mass shootings. Looking out his office window at Aurora City Hall, he could see the cheerful pink neon sign of the Century 16 movie theater sparkling in the sun. That morning there were still so many unanswered questions, so many people still unaccounted for after a gunman burst into a midnight showing of "The Dark Knight Rises" and began shooting.
WORLD
October 29, 2004 | Monte Morin, Times Staff Writer
Iraqi insurgents Thursday released grisly video showing the beheading and execution-style shooting of 11 Iraqi soldiers, who the group said were abducted south of Baghdad this week as revenge for "guarding crusader American troops." Another video released by a different group showed the latest foreigner to be kidnapped: a Polish woman threatened by masked insurgents holding a pistol to her head. The group demanded that Poland withdraw its troops from Iraq in exchange for the hostage's life.
OPINION
April 17, 2007 | James Alan Fox, JAMES ALAN FOX is a professor of criminal justice at Northeastern University and the author of many books, including "The Will to Kill" (2006) and "Extreme Killing" (2005).
MASS MURDER certainly wasn't invented with the 1966 Texas Tower shootings. For as long as there has been history, there has been murder -- including horrific mass murder. Certainly in the first half of the 20th century there were examples, such as the case of Howard Unruh, a mentally ill war veteran who killed 13 people in 13 minutes with a Luger pistol on the streets of Camden, N.J., in 1949. But 1966 was a dramatic turning point. On Aug.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 2012 | By Bob Pool, Los Angeles Times
Manuel Vasquez defends the unusual product he's selling. But not everyone's buying it. Vasquez is the 26-year-old co-owner of a boutique who produces records in his spare time. His latest release features music written and performed by convicted mass murderer Charles Manson. "I've gotten some hate mail from it. There are people not appreciating the release of music by him," he said. "People say they don't understand why I'd want to associate myself with this or why I would be interested in releasing it. " Even his parents tried to talk him out of pressing and selling the 40-minute vinyl album.
NATIONAL
July 21, 2012 | Joe Mozingo and Matt Stevens
The suspect in the Colorado shooting Friday was described as a shy but polite, highly intelligent young man with a gift for science. He grew up in an affluent suburb of San Diego, played soccer and ran cross-country in high school, and graduated with honors at UC Riverside with a degree in neuroscience. Few details in the emerging sketch of James E. Holmes -- the 24-year-old alleged to have killed at least 12 people and injured 58 others at a movie theater -- offer any answer to the question Americans find themselves once again asking after a gun rampage: Why?
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