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Mass Murders California

NEWS
August 7, 1989
The lawyer for Ramon Salcido, charged with killing three members of his family and three others in an April 14 rampage in Northern California wine country, says he wants to prove his client has a brain disorder by giving him cocaine. "I want to get him intoxicated with some cocaine and see what the connection is," said Deputy Public Defender Marteen Miller, who believes Salcido used cocaine and alcohol on the day of the killing rampage.
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NEWS
January 19, 1989 | CARL INGRAM and ROBERT A. JONES, Times Staff Writers
Patrick Edward Purdy did not come to the grounds of Cleveland Elementary School as a complete stranger. The gunman who raked the school's crowded playground with 110 rounds of rifle fire, killing five children and wounding 29 others and a teacher before taking his own life, had himself completed kindergarten through second grade at Cleveland, officials said Wednesday. The significance of the discovery was not immediately clear.
NEWS
November 24, 1988 | United Press International
City officials have asked a state panel to investigate the Sacramento Police Department's operation and policies, including those related to the handling of mass-murder suspect Dorothea Montalvo Puente. "We know some things went wrong last week that shouldn't have gone wrong," Mayor Anne Rudin said Tuesday. "We want to assure the public that whatever it is will not be repeated."
NEWS
January 18, 1989 | JOHN HURST and STEPHEN BRAUN, Times Staff Writers
Within hours of the carnage in the Stockton schoolyard, law enforcement officials knew a lot about the semiautomatic assault rifle that Patrick Edward Purdy wielded Tuesday with such deadly accuracy. They knew who manufactured it. They knew the name of its New York importer and the location of the Oregon store that sold it to Purdy. They knew that he had fixed a bayonet to the barrel and carved "Freedom" and "Victory" on the gun's wooden grip.
NEWS
July 18, 1989
After a lengthy investigation, Sacramento County Coroner Charles Simmons has concluded that he cannot say whether seven people whose bodies were unearthed at a Victorian boardinghouse near the Capitol were murdered. While various drugs were found in the bodies, Simmons said he was unable, because of decomposition, to determine whether the drugs caused the deaths.
NEWS
January 11, 1989 | Associated Press
Traces of a drug used as sleeping pills and tranquilizers have been detected in all seven bodies unearthed from the yard of a downtown boardinghouse, a newspaper reported Tuesday. The Sacramento Union, citing an unidentified source, identified the drug as benzodiazepine. Valium and Dalmane are types of the drug, which can be lethal, especially when taken in combination with alcohol or a sedative.
NEWS
June 24, 1987
Juan Corona, who has served 14 years in prison for the 1971 killings of 25 migrant farm workers near Yuba City, was denied parole for the second time. State Board of Pardons spokesman Edmund Tong said Corona was an "unreasonable risk to the public." The three-member board, meeting at Soledad Prison, cited Corona's "horrendous homicides, the evidence of extensive premeditation and inexplicable motive" as reasons for keeping him behind bars.
NEWS
July 26, 1990 | From the Associated Press
Juan Corona, convicted of hacking to death 25 migrant farm workers nearly two decades ago, plans to admit the grisly crimes for the first time next week before the state parole board, his lawyer said Wednesday. "He indicated that he is going to be willing to talk about it," said Don Condren, who will represent Corona at his parole hearing next Wednesday. "At least he was when I spoke with him three weeks ago.
NEWS
December 13, 1988 | From United Press International
Coroner's investigators identified a fifth body Monday in the case of a grandmotherly boardinghouse manager suspected of killing elderly tenants to collect their government assistance checks. Officers said X-rays helped determine that remains unearthed from the yard of the two-story Victorian house were those of James Albert Gallop, 63. His was one of seven bodies that authorities found buried in shallow graves six blocks from the state Capitol grounds last month.
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