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Mass Murders El Salvador

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NEWS
April 25, 1998 | JUANITA DARLING and DIEGO ALEMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Friends and colleagues have taken steps this week to reopen the investigation into the 1989 murders here of six Jesuit priests--a highly publicized, brutal act that caused the United States to reexamine its long, costly involvement in Central American civil wars.
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NEWS
April 25, 1998 | JUANITA DARLING and DIEGO ALEMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Friends and colleagues have taken steps this week to reopen the investigation into the 1989 murders here of six Jesuit priests--a highly publicized, brutal act that caused the United States to reexamine its long, costly involvement in Central American civil wars.
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NEWS
October 21, 1992 | From Reuters
Forensic experts have unearthed the skeletons of children and babies in this remote hamlet, bolstering charges that soldiers killed hundreds of civilians in the largest massacre in El Salvador's civil war. Twenty-two battered skulls and skeletons were exhumed Monday from the ruins of a church where U.S.-trained soldiers of the elite Atlacatl Battalion allegedly began a three-day slaughter of more than 800 people in December, 1981. "They are all children and several were babies.
NEWS
October 21, 1992 | From Reuters
Forensic experts have unearthed the skeletons of children and babies in this remote hamlet, bolstering charges that soldiers killed hundreds of civilians in the largest massacre in El Salvador's civil war. Twenty-two battered skulls and skeletons were exhumed Monday from the ruins of a church where U.S.-trained soldiers of the elite Atlacatl Battalion allegedly began a three-day slaughter of more than 800 people in December, 1981. "They are all children and several were babies.
NEWS
February 2, 1990 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Alfredo Cristiani of El Salvador held intensive talks with key lawmakers Thursday in an effort to persuade Congress not to suspend military aid to his embattled government because of the recent slayings of six Jesuit priests and other human rights abuses.
NEWS
January 9, 1990 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration praised El Salvador on Monday for admitting military involvement in the recent slayings of six Jesuit priests, but members of Congress suggested that continued U.S. military support for the tiny Central American nation might be in jeopardy unless the killers are punished.
NEWS
August 19, 1991 | Associated Press
An army colonel angry because his girlfriend refused to dance with him lobbed a grenade onto a dance floor Sunday, killing six people and injuring 90, the Red Cross said. Witnesses identified the alleged attacker as Col. Jorge Alberto Cuellar. His girlfriend and a 5-year-old girl died at the scene, and four others died at hospitals.
NEWS
September 27, 1991 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of the most defining chapters in El Salvador's blood-soaked history--the trial of a senior Salvadoran military officer accused in the killing of six Roman Catholic priests and two of their employees--opened Thursday, mired in bureaucratic disorganization, mind-numbing procedure and doubts that the real criminals are in the dock. This is the first time in El Salvador's history that any soldier has been summoned before a civilian court for human rights abuses.
NEWS
November 18, 1989 | MARJORIE MILLER and RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Roman Catholic Church officials said Friday that the U.S.-backed Salvadoran government and leftist rebels have agreed to church mediation for a cease-fire. But there was no official declaration of agreement from either side in the conflict. The cease-fire appeal came from Pope John Paul II a day after the rector of the Jesuit-run Central American University and five other priests were brutally executed by unidentified gunmen allegedly wearing military uniforms.
NEWS
January 25, 1992 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A civilian judge on Friday sentenced two army officers to a maximum of 30 years in prison for the 1989 massacre of six Jesuit priests, their maid and her daughter. The murders, which occurred during a massive rebel offensive in San Salvador, sparked international outrage and a suspension of U.S. military aid. The assassinations became one of the most notorious human rights crimes committed during the 12-year civil war that claimed 75,000 lives.
NEWS
September 27, 1991 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of the most defining chapters in El Salvador's blood-soaked history--the trial of a senior Salvadoran military officer accused in the killing of six Roman Catholic priests and two of their employees--opened Thursday, mired in bureaucratic disorganization, mind-numbing procedure and doubts that the real criminals are in the dock. This is the first time in El Salvador's history that any soldier has been summoned before a civilian court for human rights abuses.
NEWS
August 19, 1991 | Associated Press
An army colonel angry because his girlfriend refused to dance with him lobbed a grenade onto a dance floor Sunday, killing six people and injuring 90, the Red Cross said. Witnesses identified the alleged attacker as Col. Jorge Alberto Cuellar. His girlfriend and a 5-year-old girl died at the scene, and four others died at hospitals.
NEWS
May 5, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A Salvadoran military court sentenced three alleged leftist rebels to prison terms ranging from four to 25 years for the 1985 killings of 13 people, including six Americans. Gunmen sprayed two outdoor cafes in the Zona Rosa neighborhood of the capital with automatic gunfire. Four U.S. Marines, two American businessmen, a Chilean, a Guatemalan and five Salvadorans were killed. Farabundo Marti National Liberation Front rebels denied responsibility for the attack.
NEWS
December 9, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
A Salvadoran judge on Saturday ordered nine soldiers to stand trial for the murder of six Jesuit priests, their housekeeper and her daughter. Court spokesman Mario Gonzalez said Judge Ricardo Zamora ruled that Col. Guillermo Benavides, three lieutenants and four soldiers will be tried on eight counts of murder as well as charges of terrorism. A ninth soldier who deserted will be tried in absentia.
BUSINESS
October 9, 1990 | SOON NEO LIM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
James Gamble, a great-great grandson and namesake of one of the founders of Procter & Gamble Co., today will ask shareholders to help him try to stop P&G from buying Salvadoran coffee beans. Gamble and others believe that tax revenues from coffee--El Salvador's leading export--support the government in its civil war with leftist guerrillas. His resolution, to be voted on at the company's annual meeting in Cincinnati, calls for suspension of coffee bean purchases until the war is settled.
NEWS
December 10, 1989 | MARJORIE MILLER and TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Alfredo Cristiani said Saturday that the official investigation into last month's assassinations of six Jesuit priests is focusing on the Salvadoran armed forces, but he refused to blame the murders on the military. Cristiani said FBI and Salvadoran investigators have the names of all soldiers posted in the area of Central American University on Nov. 16, the night the priests, their cook and her daughter were shot to death at the Jesuit residence there.
NEWS
January 11, 1990 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After meeting with El Salvador's top military leaders, a key U.S. senator lauded progress in the investigation into the slaying of six Jesuit priests but warned that the Salvadoran government must push forward to prosecute the killers. Sen. Christopher J. Dodd (D-Conn.), head of the House Foreign Affairs subcommittee on the Western Hemisphere, also indicated at a news conference that Congress is seeking prosecution of the so-called intellectual authors of the Nov.
NEWS
August 26, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
A ninth soldier was arrested in connection with the slaying of six Jesuit priests and two others after he fled from a courtroom last Friday during questioning, military sources said. The order to arrest Sgt. Oscar Armando Solorzano came after he "was caught giving false testimony and contradicted himself several times" while testifying as a witness in the controversial case, a court spokesman said. Solorzano is a member of the commando unit of the elite U.S.
NEWS
August 25, 1990 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Watching the Salvadoran and American governments grapple with last year's murder of six Jesuit priests is like looking at a series of French Impressionist paintings of a cathedral. The shifting light of the passing day appears to change the view, but the reality, the cathedral, remains the same.
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