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NEWS
March 6, 2012 | By David Meeks
Mitt Romney coasted to victory in his home state of Massachusetts, easily winning the primary Tuesday over three opponents who did not bother to campaign there. Massachusetts awards its 38 delegates proportionally to candidates who receive 15% or more of the vote, and it appeared Romney was in position to get almost all of them. Romney served as governor of Massachusetts for one term, from 2003-07, and has long been considered a moderate on the political spectrum, though he has emphasized more conservative positions during the Republican primary.
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NATIONAL
March 29, 2014 | By Maeve Reston
Enrollments in the nation's healthcare program have nearly concluded, but for states whose insurance exchanges have been crippled by technical problems, a difficult phase is just beginning: potential legal battles and a race to overhaul their systems before federal grant money dries up. Officials in Oregon, Massachusetts and Maryland are exploring legal options as they sever contracts with those who created their sites. All three states are considering a move to the federal exchange, which had its own grievous start-up problems but is now largely stable, or licensing the technology of a more successful state such as Connecticut.
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OPINION
January 20, 2010 | Tim Rutten
You can bet that political strategists in both parties will be parsing the meaning of the Massachusetts senatorial struggle for some time to come. If there was a slam dunk left in American politics, it should've been the Democrats' ability to easily retain a Senate seat they'd held for 57 years in what has become essentially a sea-blue state. Instead, they lost. Given its importance in the issue of the moment, the Massachusetts vote is going to be analyzed as a referendum on President Obama's healthcare reforms.
NATIONAL
March 6, 2014 | By Michael Muskal
The top court of Massachusetts, founded in the 17th century by Puritans, has ruled in the 21st century that state law does not protect a woman's privacy from a man with a cellphone who wants to snap an "upskirt" photo of her as she rides on a Boston trolley. Michael Robertson was arrested in August 2010 by transit police who set up a sting after getting reports that he was using his cellphone to take photos and video up female riders' skirts and dresses, a process known as “upskirting.” On Wednesday, the Supreme Judicial Court overruled a lower court and dismissed the charges.
NEWS
October 22, 2012 | By Howard Blume
As in previous debates, Mitt Romney has referred to the education system in Massachusetts as No. 1 in the nation. On Monday, he referred, in particular, to fourth- and eighth-graders ranking at the top. Student achievement in Massachusetts is arguably first in the country based on the National Assessment of Educational Progress, a test given to a sample of students nationwide. These are the test results to which Romney was referring. Massachusetts also has been praised for its rigorous academic standards.
NEWS
November 6, 2012 | By Matt Pearce
In one of the nation's marquee U.S. Senate races this November, Democratic challenger and Harvard Law professor Elizabeth Warren hopes to unseat Sen. Scott Brown, who won a stunning victory two years ago in a state with just 11% of voters registered as Republican. Warren's campaign has drawn a lot of attention from the left for her promises to crack down on abuses by Wall Street. For his part, Brown -- whose election first broke the Democrats' filibuster-proof majority in the Senate as President Barack Obama worked to pass his signature healthcare law - has positioned himself as a moderate while drawing millions in donations from financial firms wary of Warren's rhetoric.
NEWS
February 17, 2012 | By Kim Geiger
Massachusetts Sen. Scott Brown, whose upset victory in early 2010 marked the moment when many started to take the tea party movement seriously, leads his likely 2012 Democratic challenger Elizabeth Warren by 9 percentage points, according to a new survey of voters. Brown has 49% support compared with Warren's 40%, according to a Suffolk University poll released Thursday. Warren, whose reputation as a consumer advocate has made her the darling of progressive activists, holds a commanding lead over her Democratic challengers for the party's nomination, which will be decided in the primary election Sept.
NEWS
August 8, 2011 | By Noam N. Levey
Massachusetts, whose 2006 healthcare overhaul provided a template for the landmark national law signed by President Obama last year, has already demonstrated that it is possible to achieve almost universal health coverage. Now, the trailblazing state is providing another clue about what may happen when the federal government begins guaranteeing health insurance for all citizens starting in 2014. Massachusetts community health centers and so-called safety-net hospitals - originally created to serve the poor and uninsured - have seen no let-up in demand, even after the state's reforms, according to new research published Monday in the Archives of Internal Medicine.
NATIONAL
January 20, 2010 | By James Oliphant and Mark Z. Barabak
In a stunning blow to Democrats, Republican Scott Brown on Tuesday seized the Massachusetts Senate seat once held by Edward M. Kennedy, handing the GOP the crucial vote that could thwart President Obama's far-reaching agenda, beginning with healthcare reform. More broadly, Brown's epic upset signals the start of what could be an exceedingly tough year nationwide for Democrats, who are fighting to hang on to their majorities in the House and Senate in a political climate that seems to grow more hostile by the day. "The effort to pass Obama's legislative agenda has grown more difficult, a flood of new Democratic congressional retirements may follow, and Republicans will certainly feel emboldened to expand their list of Democratic targets for the fall election," said Rhodes Cook, an independent campaign analyst.
NATIONAL
June 2, 2011 | Times Wire Services
— At least two tornadoes swept through western and central Massachusetts on Wednesday, slamming debris into buildings, toppling trees and killing four people, the governor said. The storms did extensive damage in Springfield, the state's third-largest city with 150,000 people. About 40 people were injured, Mayor Domenic J. Sarno said. One person died in Springfield, two in West Springfield and another in Brimfield, authorities said. Tornadoes were reported in several other communities, including Monson and Sturbridge.
NATIONAL
March 6, 2014 | By Michael Muskal
Massachusetts lawmakers Thursday approved legislation making it a crime to take secret photos of private body parts, a quick response to a state supreme court ruling that dismissed charges against a man who took “upskirt” photos of female trolley passengers.  Under the new law, anyone who attempts to take such photos without consent would face a maximum penalty of more than two years in jail and a $5,000 fine, the Associated Press reported....
SPORTS
January 18, 2014 | By Eric Sondheimer
 Vance Jackson scored 26 points and Daniel Hamilton had 25 points to help St. John Bosco defeat Maryland St. Frances, 63-60, in Springfield, Mass. The Braves (12-6) won without Tyler Dorsey, who stayed home in a parental decision to work on academics. In the battle of Sherman Oaks, Buckley improved to 23-0 with a 66-50 win over Notre Dame. Andrew Schianterelli had 15 points, Austin Butler 14 and Astin Beal 10. At La Salle, Aaron Holiday scored 33 points as Campbell Hall defeated Price, 71-65.
NATIONAL
January 15, 2014 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - In a case pitting free speech against abortion rights, Supreme Court justices signaled Wednesday they were inclined to strike down a Massachusetts law that sets a 35-foot buffer zone to prevent protesters from approaching clinics that offer the procedure. Opponents called the law a violation of free speech and complained it prohibits "peaceful conversation on a public sidewalk," said Mark Rienzi, the attorney representing antiabortion activist Eleanor McCullen, 77, from Boston.
NATIONAL
December 24, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
The Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court struck down a judge's power to choose to give a life sentence without parole to juveniles. The unanimous ruling by the state's highest court came after the U.S. Supreme Court in June struck down mandatory life sentences for minors. The state's top court went further in its Tuesday ruling, saying that even discretionary sentences should be banned. “Given the unique characteristics of juvenile offenders, they should be afforded, in appropriate circumstances, the opportunity to be considered for parole suitability,” the court wrote in its decision.
NATIONAL
December 10, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
A middle school student in Waltham, Mass., allegedly prepared a list of students whom he wanted to kill for making fun of him, according to local media reports. The student is currently not in the school, John F. Kennedy Middle School, Waltham Mayor Jeannette McCarthy told boston.com on Tuesday. She said she was confident that all students were safe. "I wouldn't feel hesitant to send [children] to that school," she told the website. "We had a response, it was an immediate response, and I believe the superintendent followed up with it swiftly.
OPINION
December 2, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
A Massachusetts law that says "no person" may enter or remain in the 35-foot buffer zones established outside abortion clinics in the state has set off a controversial legal battle about the proper balance between the rights of speakers and the rights of those who must listen to them. Although several federal courts have upheld the law over the last few years, the Supreme Court has now agreed to review it. The high court should uphold it as well. The petitioners, including a grandmother in her 70s who stands outside abortion clinics hoping to talk to women on their way in, claim that the law is an impermissible infringement on their right to express their opinion.
NATIONAL
November 22, 2013 | By Soumya Karlamangla
Court documents unsealed Friday say that a Massachusetts teenager charged with raping and killing his math teacher planned the attack, bringing a box cutter, a mask, gloves and multiple changes of clothing to school. Colleen Ritzer, 24, a popular math teacher at Danvers High School, was found dead in woods near the school on Oct. 23, shocking the small northeastern Massachusetts town.  The killing generated even more shock when a student became the main suspect. Philip Chism, 14, was indicted by a grand jury on charges of murder, aggravated rape and armed robbery.
NATIONAL
December 10, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
A middle school student in Waltham, Mass., allegedly prepared a list of students whom he wanted to kill for making fun of him, according to local media reports. The student is currently not in the school, John F. Kennedy Middle School, Waltham Mayor Jeannette McCarthy told boston.com on Tuesday. She said she was confident that all students were safe. "I wouldn't feel hesitant to send [children] to that school," she told the website. "We had a response, it was an immediate response, and I believe the superintendent followed up with it swiftly.
NATIONAL
November 22, 2013 | By Soumya Karlamangla
Court documents unsealed Friday say that a Massachusetts teenager charged with raping and killing his math teacher planned the attack, bringing a box cutter, a mask, gloves and multiple changes of clothing to school. Colleen Ritzer, 24, a popular math teacher at Danvers High School, was found dead in woods near the school on Oct. 23, shocking the small northeastern Massachusetts town.  The killing generated even more shock when a student became the main suspect. Philip Chism, 14, was indicted by a grand jury on charges of murder, aggravated rape and armed robbery.
NEWS
November 8, 2013 | By Anne Harnagel
If you're baffled by the almost hypnotic effect of Impressionist artwork, a new exhibit at the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, Mass., may finally solve that mystery -- and explain why Californians may feel a special connection to the French artworks. Through Feb. 17, visitors will be able to explore "Impressionists on the Water" and the interplay of light, water and sky that has been irresistible to many artists. With more than 90 prints, paintings, photographs and models, the exhibit reveals how living near the Atlantic Ocean and France's waterways influenced Edouard Manet, Claude Monet, Auguste Renoir, Gustave Caillebotte and Georges Seurat, among other artists.
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