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Massage Parlors

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1998 | JOHN CANALIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Massage practitioners are outraged over a proposal that would require them to pass screenings for four sexually transmitted diseases if they want to work in Fountain Valley. Hoping to weed out prostitutes who pose as legitimate massage technicians, the City Council will consider next month whether to require therapists to be tested for chlamydia, gonorrhea, syphilis, hepatitis A, B and C as well as tuberculosis.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1998 | LESLEY WRIGHT
There's good and bad news for massage therapists in Orange. They have been proclaimed legitimate professional enterprises and will no longer be considered "adult businesses" by city officials. But they will have to prove their professional standards and submit to regulations drafted by those same officials. Council members initially approved the changes in February. But they had to wait weeks as city attorneys worked with masseurs and masseuses over the terms of the standards.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1998 | JOHN CANALIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Long troubled by illicit massage parlors, this Orange County city is turning to a novel weapon to drive prostitutes out of town: A multiple-choice quiz. Costa Mesa officials unveiled a plan last week to begin testing massage license applicants on their knowledge of the human body, massage techniques, laws, first aid and ethical conduct. Ideally, trained technicians will pass, and anyone else will fail.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 1998 | JOHN CANALIS
A written test designed to separate legitimate massage therapists from sex workers won final approval this week. A city-issued exam on local requirements, technique, anatomy, physiology and ethics would stop prostitutes who forged their credentials from operating under the guise of legality, supporters said. A split City Council passed the new regulations Monday and will base the test on Newport Beach's. Under the guidelines, practitioners licensed in Newport can practice in Costa Mesa.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1998 | JOHN CANALIS
In the hope of weeding out those who use massage therapy as a front for prostitution, practitioners who apply for a license may need to pass a written test. Police were granted preliminary approval Monday from the City Council to develop an exam evaluating applicants' knowledge of health issues and techniques that are covered in certified massage schools that require 500 hours of study and practice. Formal approval may come this month.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1998 | JOHN CANALIS
To help ensure that massage parlors are not fronts for prostitution, police will ask the City Council on Monday to more closely scrutinize applicants seeking business licenses. Vice detail officers are asking that all applicants be tested on their knowledge of massage, safety procedures and other elements of the profession, a practice already underway in Newport Beach. Costa Mesa already does background checks of applicants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1998 | LESLEY WRIGHT
Massage therapy soon will cease to be treated as an "adult business" here, but practitioners will have to prove they know their stuff under a new ordinance tentatively approved this week. The City Council, following a regional trend, unanimously endorsed a local law requiring masseurs and masseuses to show they are adequately trained and have passed a national exam.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 1998 | CATHY WERBLIN
Massage practitioners hoping to ply their trade in the city will have to abide by new rules adopted this week by the City Council. Under amendments to the city's existing requirements, masseurs and masseuses will need 600 hours of basic education if they lack experience in the field. The requirement increases by 100 the number of hours needed by new practitioners and falls in line with guidelines issued by the American Massage Therapy Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 1997 | JOHN CANALIS
Council members have denied a massage parlor applicant a license because she was cited in Newport Beach for wearing a neckline that was too revealing. Ellen Sue Tiedt was cited March 5 in Newport Beach for wearing clothing the city deemed inappropriate in its guidelines for masseurs and masseuses. Newport Beach requires necklines 3 inches or less from the collarbone. Tiedt, 43, said she was wearing an open lab coat over a 4-inch neckline; she paid a $100 fine.
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