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Massage Parlors

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1998 | LESLEY WRIGHT
Massage therapists will be able to set up shop in any of the city's commercial districts if final passage of an ordinance goes through Nov. 10. After public hearings, meetings and legal wrangling, the City Council voted last week to cease treating massage shops as "adult businesses" and allow them to operate like any other enterprise.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 1998 | MICHAEL BAKER
Owners of a Canoga Park business, which city authorities say poses as a health club but is really a massage parlor, missed a public hearing Friday to determine whether they will have to stop operating at their current location. In fact, other than the presiding zoning administrator, only one other person attended the hearing at the Sherman Oaks Woman's Club--an angry adjacent neighbor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 1998
The City Council has denied an appeal from the owner of the Claremont Therapeutic Shiatsu Massage Parlor to renew its city operating license, shutting down the city's single massage parlor. City officials on Wednesday denied the owner's request based on municipal code violations at the business, which is in the 900 block of Foothill Boulevard, said Bridget Healy, assistant city manager.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1998 | CHRIS CEBALLOS
The Planning Commission on Monday approved plans to build a day spa and massage center at the Kaleidoscope entertainment center on Crown Valley Parkway. The Burke Williams Day Spa would employ as many as 60 masseuses. The 12,000-square-foot facility will have 12 to 15 massage rooms, six to eight skin-care rooms as well as other health and beauty facilities. Clint Sherrod, the city's director of community development, initially recommended that the commission deny the company's proposal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1998 | JOHN CANALIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Massage practitioners are outraged over a proposal that would require them to pass screenings for four sexually transmitted diseases if they want to work in Fountain Valley. Hoping to weed out prostitutes who pose as legitimate massage technicians, the City Council will consider next month whether to require therapists to be tested for chlamydia, gonorrhea, syphilis, hepatitis A, B and C as well as tuberculosis.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1998 | JOHN CANALIS
Fees for massage licenses were approved this week to cover the costs of new regulations aimed at driving away prostitutes who pose as legitimate technicians. The City Council this year directed vice officers to work with massage educators and write an exam testing professional conduct of practitioners. Everyone who wishes to practice would have to pass the test, and police said prostitutes who use massage parlors would likely fail.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1998 | LESLEY WRIGHT
There's good and bad news for massage therapists in Orange. They have been proclaimed legitimate professional enterprises and will no longer be considered "adult businesses" by city officials. But they will have to prove their professional standards and submit to regulations drafted by those same officials. Council members initially approved the changes in February. But they had to wait weeks as city attorneys worked with masseurs and masseuses over the terms of the standards.
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