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NEWS
February 16, 1995 | Associated Press
Doctors may soon tell patients with tension headaches: "Take two massages and call me in the morning." A study suggests tension headaches start with previously undiscovered tissues that link the brain with upper neck muscles. If that's right, ways to relax neck muscles could challenge the $2.2-billion headache remedy market.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 1993
The irony of a paper that prints each morning its lineage of publishers (with the name Chandler appearing with considerable frequency) publishing a report revealing that people hire their relatives is too delicious. The wonderful photograph elsewhere in the issue of Melvin Van Peebles in his son Mario's film eloquently gave the lie to the undiluted scorn of your article. For what it's worth, I think the article misses the point: It is money, not blood, that makes the media massage mediocre films--how else to explain the puff pieces in your paper about "Home Alone 2" and the rest?
MAGAZINE
May 9, 1999 | DEANNE STILLMAN
I don't know about you, but I'm damn happy that Hawaii is a state. You don't need a passport to have a vacation there, and the tropical wonderland has provided us with a treasure trove of riches. There's surfing, for one. There's the macadamia nut, for another, satisfying in its own right, but even better when transmuted into a coffee flavor. Then there's the pineapple, without which we would not have those many "surprise" desserts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 2001 | ALLISON COHEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Massage therapist Linda Husar uses her strong hands to ease the pain suffered by women who have been physically and emotionally abused. Some have bruises all over their bodies and others have survived attempted strangulation. Clients are referred to Husar, of Valencia, by the Assn. to Aid Victims of Domestic Violence, a nonprofit agency in Newhall that provides short-term shelter and support for abused women.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2003 | Chris Erskine
So here we are comparing love stories. About Valentine's Day. Christmas with hormones. "When did Valentine's become like Christmas?" my friend Paul asks. "Used to be a box of chocolates." I tell him how I had to race home Friday night, stop at the department store, buy a bunch of things in the wrong size and color, in an effort to impress her with my good taste and thoughtfulness. "You're a generous guy," he notes. "I have," I remind him, "a marriage of inconvenience." "Flowers?" he asks.
IMAGE
May 9, 2010 | By Kelsey Ramos, Los Angeles Times
This spa in the heart of Koreatown is as much about experiencing the community of Korean spa culture as it is about getting a massage or facial. While making an appointment even two days in advance was simple, the online menu had few treatment details (though prices were up to date) and the telephone receptionist couldn't answer my questions about the treatments. On a Monday morning, parking was easy to find and free with spa validation. The building's Korean retail stores and window-paneled facade give it the look of a corporate office, with only the driving range's big nets on Western Avenue alluding to the fitness center inside.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2013 | By Sheri Linden
Lynn Shelton specializes in the small-scale high concept. She has an eye for delicately observed moments and casual absurdities that spin around an obvious plot engine. Like her features "Humpday" and "Your Sister's Sister," her latest Seattle-set comic drama, "Touchy Feely," is a work that gestures toward depths without truly plumbing them. In its gentle way, it's also her broadest, most schematic film. As the story of friends, family and identity crisis meanders toward its low-key feel-good conclusion, exceptionally lovely, nuanced performances by Rosemarie DeWitt and Allison Janney are the chief draw.
NEWS
March 15, 2009 | Min Lee, Lee writes for the Associated Press.
All four women were prostitutes. And all four were killed in rented apartments where they were working alone. The back-to-back killings have drawn attention to a peculiarity of Hong Kong law: Prostitution is legal, but brothels are not. As a result, many prostitutes work alone in apartments, leaving them vulnerable to attack. The law also bans others from making money off prostitution -- a rule meant to keep out pimps, but which also prevents sex workers from hiring security guards.
WORLD
October 20, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wires
A deputy in Mexico's Congress stirred up a fuss by offering fellow lawmakers a 10% discount on chocolate massages at a posh salon, even as proposed legislation went unfinished. Angelica de la Pena's letter on official paper to the lower chamber's 500 members backfired when newspapers published it. "I think there are more interesting issues that we should be communicating to each other about," Deputy Luis Antonio Gonzalez said.
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