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Massimo D Alema

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January 9, 1999 | From Associated Press
Pope John Paul II, an ardent foe of communism, welcomed former Communist leader Massimo D'Alema--Italy's new prime minister and an admitted nonbeliever--during a pomp-filled visit Friday. "It was an emotional moment for me," said D'Alema, adding that John Paul put him at ease.
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NEWS
January 9, 1999 | From Associated Press
Pope John Paul II, an ardent foe of communism, welcomed former Communist leader Massimo D'Alema--Italy's new prime minister and an admitted nonbeliever--during a pomp-filled visit Friday. "It was an emotional moment for me," said D'Alema, adding that John Paul put him at ease.
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NEWS
October 20, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
President Oscar Luigi Scalfaro formally asked former Communist Massimo D'Alema to form Italy's 56th government since World War II. The request came after D'Alema said he had assembled a parliamentary majority in days of hard bargaining with centrist and leftist parties. The Vatican's newspaper was sharply critical of Scalfaro for tapping a former Communist as Italy's next premier, succeeding Romano Prodi.
NEWS
December 23, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Prime Minister Massimo D'Alema's new center-left Cabinet won a vote of confidence early today in the Senate, a key step in ending Italy's political crisis. The new government, sworn in late Wednesday, faces another vote in the Chamber of Deputies, the lower house. If the government loses that vote today, President Carlo Azeglio Ciampi could ask someone else to try to muster a new governing majority or could call early elections.
NEWS
January 12, 1999 | Associated Press
Kurdish rebel leader Abdullah Ocalan probably will not be given political asylum in Italy, the Italian prime minister said Monday. Prime Minister Massimo D'Alema also reaffirmed Italy's refusal to send Ocalan to Turkey for trial but said Italy could try Ocalan itself if the rebel leader doesn't leave Rome shortly. Ocalan came to Rome on Nov.
NEWS
December 3, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Italian Prime Minister Massimo D'Alema was welcomed into Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi's Tripoli home. It was the first visit to Libya by a Western leader since sanctions imposed in 1992 by the United Nations after the bombing of a jetliner isolated the North African country.
NEWS
October 16, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Italy's ousted premier, Romano Prodi, gave up trying to form a new government and threw his support to a former Communist, Massimo D'Alema, after calling on President Oscar Luigi Scalfaro to say he had failed in two days of talks aimed at winning back the support of a majority of lawmakers. Prodi's center-left government fell Oct. 9 when he lost a vote of confidence in Parliament. "A heavy burden has been lifted from my shoulders," Prodi said, "but it was a burden I'd have like to have kept."
NEWS
April 19, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Massimo D'Alema will resign as prime minister of Italy and his center-left coalition will start searching for a head of government able to hold back opposition pressure for a snap general election. D'Alema, wounded by the center-right's strong showing in regional elections Sunday, was due to address the Senate at 10 a.m. today.
NEWS
February 28, 1993 | From Associated Press
About 100,000 workers carrying red flags and banners marched through the center of Rome on Saturday to protest rising unemployment and demand the resignation of Prime Minister Giuliano Amato. "This demonstration is for work and against Amato," said Massimo D'Alema, from the Democratic Party of the Left, the former Communist Party. The government has not released recent unemployment figures, but the jobless rate stood at 11.3% at the end of last year.
NEWS
March 6, 1999 | From a Times Staff Writer
President Clinton said Friday that he hopes Monica S. Lewinsky "will be permitted to go on with her life, and I hope it will be a good life." Two days after the former White House intern began marketing her tale of sexual encounters with the president, Clinton said he did not resent her efforts to make money from the scandal. "I don't wish anyone ill who was caught up in this, and she paid quite a high price for a long time, and I feel badly for that.
NEWS
November 27, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
Kurdish rebels loyal to guerrilla leader Abdullah Ocalan sabotaged a government-owned oil pipeline in southeastern Turkey, setting fire to an estimated 50 tons of crude oil, a security official said Thursday. The attack by Kurdistan Workers Party guerrillas took place in Mardin province late Wednesday on a pipeline running from Iraq to the Turkish Mediterranean port of Ceyhan. Officials said the fire was extinguished and they were examining the extent of the damage.
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