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ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 2010
Have no fear, Los Angeles-area "Masterpiece" fans. You'll still be able to see your favorite mystery. PBS announced Tuesday that KOCE-TV, the network's Orange County affiliate, will pick up Sunday airings of "Masterpiece" starting with this week's premiere of "Sherlock. " The move comes in the wake of KCET-TV announcing its departure from PBS effective Jan. 1 after battling network officials over dues and other issues. Even before it left the network, KCET had shuffled "Masterpiece" to Thursdays to make way for a Sunday movie night.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 2014 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
Dr. Sherwin B. Nuland was a respected surgeon and bioethicist at Yale University and author of two modestly successful books when he was approached in the early 1990s by a young literary editor. The agent was looking for someone to write a book about what happens to the body and mind during the process of dying, and Nuland had been recommended to him. "I thought surely there were hundreds of books already" on the topic, Nuland later said, but the agent said there were not and encouraged him to check his libraries.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2010
'Masterpiece Classic: The Diary of Anne Frank' Where: KCET When: 9 p.m. Sunday Rating: TV-PG (may be unsuitable for young children)
OPINION
March 2, 2014 | By Edward Frenkel
Imagine you had to take an art class in which you were taught how to paint a fence or a wall, but you were never shown the paintings of the great masters, and you weren't even told that such paintings existed. Pretty soon you'd be asking, why study art? That's absurd, of course, but it's surprisingly close to the way we teach children mathematics. In elementary and middle school and even into high school, we hide math's great masterpieces from students' view. The arithmetic, algebraic equations and geometric proofs we do teach are important, but they are to mathematics what whitewashing a fence is to Picasso - so reductive it's almost a lie. Most of us never get to see the real mathematics because our current math curriculum is more than 1,000 years old. For example, the formula for solutions of quadratic equations was in al-Khwarizmi's book published in 830, and Euclid laid the foundations of Euclidean geometry around 300 BC. If the same time warp were true in physics or biology, we wouldn't know about the solar system, the atom and DNA. This creates an extraordinary educational gap for our kids, schools and society.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2008 | Lynn Smith
Scottish-born actor Alan Cumming ("Tin Man," "X-Men 2") has been tapped to host the coming season of PBS' "Masterpiece Mystery!," it was announced Thursday. The new season will start June 22, with "Inspector Lewis, Series I," a spinoff of the "Inspector Morse" series, followed by other British television mysteries. Cumming came to the attention of "Masterpiece" executive producer Rebecca Eaton during his Tony Award-winning performance in the 1998 Broadway revival of "Cabaret." Recently he starred with Dianne Wiest in an off-Broadway production of "The Seagull."
SPORTS
July 11, 1992
I enjoy watching the best players play--not because they are winning by such big margins but because I get a chance to see how truly great these guys are. If you don't like to see Custer at Little Big Horn, turn it off. There are other channels--a lot of them if you got cable. EDWARD WHITE Los Angeles
SPORTS
December 7, 1985
I hope Terry Donahue read Jim Murray's column. It's one of his masterpieces and fit him to a "T." What is he going to do next year when he won't have Mr. Three Points to rely on? He'll have to go for it! JACK BRYAN Long Beach
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 1985 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, Times Music Critic
The Metropolitan Opera--big, rich, glamorous, smug and just a tad tired--opened the season last week with Puccini's presumably indestructible "Tosca." Ho hum. Montserrat Caballe sang the title role and Luciano Pavarotti impersonated Cavaradossi in the spectacular overproduction concocted last year by Franco Zeffirelli. The local press found the whole thing something of a travesty. Donal Henahan in the New York Times just laughed it off. Peter G.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2009 | Associated Press
David Tennant is the new host of PBS' "Masterpiece Contemporary." Tennant will make his debut on the long-running public TV anthology this fall, its producing station, WGBH, said Wednesday. The 38-year-old Scottish actor, who follows past "Masterpiece" hosts such as Alan Cumming and Laura Linney, played the title role in the long-running BBC sci-fi series "Doctor Who." His screen credits include "Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire." "Masterpiece Contemporary" returns in October with "Endgame," a drama about the final days of apartheid in South Africa starring William Hurt and Jonny Lee Miller.
OPINION
June 16, 2010 | Tim Rutten
"History is a nightmare from which I am trying to awake." Wednesday, people around the world will gather in libraries and theaters, pubs and restaurants, streets and squares to commemorate a precise set of events that included the preceding snatch of conversation and that occurred between daybreak and midnight in a provincial European city on June 16, 1904 — events they know full well never happened. This, of course, is Bloomsday, the annual celebration of the 20th century's greatest novel, "Ulysses," and of the genius of its author, the Irishman James Joyce.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2014 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Earnest and well-intentioned but ultimately inert, "The Monuments Men" talks a better game than it can deliver. Inspired by true tales of World War II derring-do, it can't decide what kind of a film it wants to be and so ends up failing across a fairly wide spectrum. This is something of a surprise, and not just because the film is directed and co-written by George Clooney, who is also top dog in a high-powered cast that includes Matt Damon, Bill Murray, John Goodman, Jean Dujardin and Cate Blanchett.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2014 | By John Horn
George Clooney and Grant Heslov describe themselves as two of the least cynical people in Hollywood. But when the longtime collaborators looked back at their recent work, they realized the movies had an unshakable gloom: "The Ides of March," "Good Night, and Good Luck," "The American" and "August: Osage County" were hardly films that made you feel better about the world. So Clooney and Heslov decided to change course and put together a crowd-pleasing tale. The resulting work, Friday's "The Monuments Men," is a curious departure for the filmmakers - a sometimes lighthearted account of a largely untold chapter of World War II history that recalls some of the less serious movies about the conflict.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
In a remarkable turn of events, a Nazi-looted Baroque masterpiece that turned up on the art market five years ago was returned Friday to its owner, who plans to donate it to the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. The life-size figure of St. Catherine of Alexandria, painted in Genoa around 1615 by Bernardo Strozzi, was installed Monday in the third floor galleries for European art. The painting, valued at between $2.5 million and $3 million, is...
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
One of the great cultural jewels of the West is back, with a wonderful new polish. When the Huntington Library in San Marino reopened its main exhibition hall on Friday for a special press preview after a 17-month renovation, you could almost feel the presence of its namesake at the front door. Henry Edwards Huntington was a railroad baron who assembled one of the most magnificent collections of books, manuscripts and letters in private hands. On Friday it gleamed again, inside new displays (illuminated with heat-free fiber optic lighting)
WORLD
November 5, 2013 | By Henry Chu
LONDON -- A massive cache of art discovered in the Munich apartment of an elderly recluse contains hitherto-unknown works by famous artists as well as pieces believed confiscated by the Nazis in their persecution of Jews or their campaign against “degenerate art,” German prosecutors said Tuesday. Some of the 1,400 items are known masterpieces believed destroyed during World War II; others are new to art historians, such as a self-portrait by painter Otto Dix. The hoard boasts works by giants of the 20th century -- Pablo Picasso, Henri Matisse, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Marc Chagall, Max Liebermann -- but also some older pieces, including a painting from the 16th century.
WORLD
November 5, 2013 | By Henry Chu
LONDON - Unknown masterpieces by artists such as Marc Chagall and Henri Matisse, works thought lost to the ravages of war and others deemed "degenerate" or looted by the Nazis form part of the spectacular trove of art discovered by German authorities in the apartment of an elderly recluse in Munich. Two days after news of the find broke, officials in southern Germany revealed Tuesday that the hoard contains 1,406 pieces by masters whose names read like a who's who of Western art of the last 150 years: Pablo Picasso, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Henri Toulouse-Lautrec, Gustave Courbet, Oskar Kokoschka, Emil Nolde.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 2009 | Stanley Meisler
Marcel Duchamp served for many years as both a prince and court jester to modern art in the 20th century. While creating some well-known works, he also punctured pretensions with jokes, pranks, aphorisms and a perpetual hunt for new byways of art. Then he announced he was abandoning art, giving it all up to play chess. But he was not telling the truth. He worked in secret for 20 years, assembling a huge, fanciful and puzzling diorama. When he died in 1968, only a few people knew about his secret.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2009 | MARY MCNAMARA, TELEVISION CRITIC
Too often, films about great moments in history get bogged down in their own logistics. The roots of the conflict must be explained, the forces that contributed to it examined, the various players introduced; by the time the action begins, the viewer can be overwhelmed. So the first remarkable thing about "Endgame," which premieres on "Masterpiece" Sunday night, is how deftly writer Paula Milne sets up the action. We are in South Africa in the final days of apartheid and Michael Young (Jonny Lee Miller)
WORLD
November 4, 2013 | By Henry Chu
LONDON -- The elderly gentleman appeared nervous when police questioned him during a customs check aboard a train from Switzerland to Germany. He was carrying about $12,000 in cash, just within the legal limit. But a feeling that something was not quite right eventually led authorities to raid the man's apartment in Munich several months later, resulting in the astonishing discovery of what could amount to more than $1.3 billion worth of artistic masterpieces, some -- or all -- of them looted by the Nazis more than 70 years ago. That would make it one of the largest such troves recovered since World War II. The stunning find is being reported by the German news magazine Focus, which said the hoard included paintings by Picasso, Chagall, Matisse and Klee that were believed to be lost or destroyed in the war. Though priceless, the 1,500 pieces were crammed next to piles of canned food in the messy Munich apartment of Cornelius Gurlitt, the 80-year-old son of a well-known Nazi-era art dealer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 2013 | Steve Lopez
On May 22, a diligent public servant at Los Angeles City Hall wrote a letter to a Venice homeowner about the treehouse that's been in her yard for 10 years. And you just know, don't you, that a story with this beginning will not have a happy ending? Back then, Antonio Villaraigosa was in his final weeks as mayor, having presided over a precipitous decline in city services during his eight years. He has since gone on to greater glory, signing on last week as an advisor with Herbalife, a company that has been accused of operating an illegal pyramid scheme and is under attack from Latino civil rights groups.
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